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Bread Thread - Page 13

post #181 of 230
that does lend a certain credibility to his statement, yes.
post #182 of 230
Quote:
Originally Posted by iammatt View Post
Yes.

Lawlz.

This butcher has pretty good products, but his pathes are too young/new, need some time for the different products used to take on each others flavors (excuse my English).

This liver wurst (a different kind of pathe) has the same problem, but makes for enjoyable eating.

Perhaps I'll post different wursts here to amuse myself. (of course only on freshly made bread, as to not stray off topic)
post #183 of 230
Yes, because that's what we all want to see, your wursts.
post #184 of 230
Bringing this back to life again. Tried my first no knead bread today. First time I've ever made homemade bread as well, and while the result wasn't perfect, I have to admit that I'm pretty proud of myself. I used too much water when I made the dough yesterday, and I didn't realize that until I had it on top of a kitchen towel, probably due to me being half asleep. Anyways, it got really sticky and it was too late to add more flour as a last-minute rescue operation, so I decided to go with it. Bread turned out pretty good - not as tall as I had hoped, but taste-wise I'm not complaining at all.
post #185 of 230
Quote:
Originally Posted by henrikc View Post
Bringing this back to life again.

Tried my first no knead bread today. First time I've ever made homemade bread as well, and while the result wasn't perfect, I have to admit that I'm pretty proud of myself.
I used too much water when I made the dough yesterday, and I didn't realize that until I had it on top of a kitchen towel, probably due to me being half asleep. Anyways, it got really sticky and it was too late to add more flour as a last-minute rescue operation, so I decided to go with it. Bread turned out pretty good - not as tall as I had hoped, but taste-wise I'm not complaining at all.

Most no-knead recipes are very high-hydration. There's just no way that an 85% hydration dough is not going to be sticky. You can certainly add more flour to reduce the stickiness, but that kind of defeats the purpose of the no-knead process.
post #186 of 230
Yep, the main problem was that I dumped it directly onto a kitchen towel () instead of placing it on the kitchen counter, folding over and then placing on the towel. Made another one yesterday, and it turned out pretty good, so I guess it's just my complete lack of experience.
post #187 of 230
Since this thread is alive again, I thought I should share some pictures of a wholemeal bread I baked last weekend.





Personally I thought it wasn't too bad for a third attempt at breadmaking. Crust was nice and firm, although I managed to char it a little. I also omitted a crumb shot because it was nothing too great. I suspect the dough was under-hydrated. A slacker dough would have formed nice large pockets. Tasted good nonetheless -- very hearty.
post #188 of 230
Third attempt?! Wow. I got this on my second attempt, so I guess I need to step up my game.
post #189 of 230
Pleased with the outcome of this. Should've watched it more closely as some of the crust got a little overdone, but overall I'm not complaining at all!
post #190 of 230
Made banana bread this weekend. I gave it to my neighbors.
post #191 of 230
Beautiful bread in here the last several posts.
post #192 of 230
I think I need to start making my own french baguettes because I can't get a decent one in Toronto.

Can anyone recommend a book? I want to stress that I'm looking to replicate an authentic baguette, and not something that's just shaped like one. The latter are easy to find in TO, but they don't have the taste and texture of the real thing. That's what I'm missing.

Suggestions?
post #193 of 230
You could try this recipe first, that's what I use. http://www.styleforum.net/showpost.p...&postcount=112 It is unlikely you will be able to achieve better results than the best French bakery in Toronto (wherever that may be) as they may have access to specialized flour, forms, and a steam oven, but it doesn't hurt to try.
post #194 of 230
Quote:
Originally Posted by Redwoood View Post
You could try this recipe first, that's what I use. http://www.styleforum.net/showpost.p...&postcount=112 It is unlikely you will be able to achieve better results than the best French bakery in Toronto (wherever that may be) as they may have access to specialized flour, forms, and a steam oven, but it doesn't hurt to try.
i don't think i've been to the best french bakery in toronto, but everything remotely close to me sucks ass and i'm convinced i can do better. I've read about a couple places that apparently do a good baguette, but they don't replenish stocks throughout the day so unless you get there early, you're SOL. I'm not really an early riser on weekends... I think I'd prefer to do my own at this point. Apparently you need to use type 55 flour. Hopefully it's available at the st.lawrence market... If not, KA apparently has this that's a fair imitation: http://www.kingarthurflour.com/shop/...yle-flour-3-lb As for the steam oven thing, i've only been researching for a short while, but it seems pouring some in a pan in the bottom of your oven may do the trick... Matt.. since you're well-traveled and eat well, i'm curious about that book you bought. Bread this side of the atlantic is generally horrible compared to what's overseas imo. I like bread but I don't want to get one that caters too much to north america's preference for mushy bread... edit: just found the real thing in sane quantities (as opposed to 50kg bags): http://www.lepicerie.com/customer/pr...3&cat=0&page=5
post #195 of 230
Quote:
Originally Posted by GQgeek View Post
As for the steam oven thing, i've only been researching for a short while, but it seems pouring some in a pan in the bottom of your oven may do the trick...

That and spraying it lightly as soon as it's in the oven.
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