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Politeness - Page 5

post #61 of 66
In Germany in the last few years there has been a change in the way shop attendants greet you when you enter a shop or step up to the cash register.
They used to say something like "good morning" or "good day", now it is just "hello". In German "hello" is actually reserved for someone you know well and although this might be called a formality it does bother me - it implies a degree of intimacy that I don't feel is called for.
Call me arrogant, but I just don't like it.
post #62 of 66


"I didn't go to six years of evil medical school to be called 'Mr.,' thank you very much!"
post #63 of 66
I know that this is politically incorrect, but when I was ages 3-6, I sometimes went with our beloved maid, Ruby, to her home in one of Birmingham, Alabama's projects. We had to ride in the back of the bus, but I loved it; the back seat was so roomy and comfortable. When we got to her place, I played with her son and my best friend, William-Henry, who was one year older than me. At Ruby's insistance, he had to call me "Mr. Kenny" and I called him "William-Henry." A few doors down in the project lived a guy who was about 9-10 years older than us, who was already a terrific athlete. His name: Willie Mays. Mays starred in baseball, basketball, and football at Birmingham's Fairfax Industrial High School before joining the Birmingham Black Barons at age 16.
post #64 of 66
Mr.Pollock, your anecdote reminds me of something. In Asia--as with their unconscious racism--they call black women "Mamies" because of what they saw in "Gone With The Wind".
post #65 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by muelleran
In Germany in the last few years there has been a change in the way shop attendants greet you when you enter a shop or step up to the cash register.
They used to say something like "good morning" or "good day", now it is just "hello". In German "hello" is actually reserved for someone you know well and although this might be called a formality it does bother me - it implies a degree of intimacy that I don't feel is called for.
Call me arrogant, but I just don't like it.

Oh, I don't think that's arrogance; at any rate I agree, even though I was not aware of the custom.

To popularize what should be intimate is not a symbol of egalitarianism as is commonly thought, for it lowers the relations between people at all levels by further eradicating any sense of magic and sacredness in human interaction.

Regards,
Huntsman
post #66 of 66
I'm in the process of flogging and flailing through Spanish lessons, and an argentinian told me that the usted form in his country is rarely used, and said that they're fairly informal.
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