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Stephen King - Page 5

post #61 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by RobGQ View Post
Anyone read Under the Dome?

I'm thinking of downloading it on iTunes but I'm not sure if it would be worth it. Some of his fans says they don't like his contemporary works.

It's pretty good. Cons - It's kind of adolescent in a way -the characters are pretty cartoonish, the bad guys are transparent caricatures of Bush & Cheney, and the hero's an old liberal guy. There's a side character who's straight out of a sixties movie - the tough redneck southerner who finds redemption by saving a child, complete with an awful transcription of what King thinks a Southern accent sounds like.

All that said, it is entertaining and I enjoyed it.
post #62 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by FLMountainMan View Post
It's pretty good. Cons - It's kind of adolescent in a way -the characters are pretty cartoonish, the bad guys are transparent caricatures of Bush & Cheney, and the hero's an old liberal guy. There's a side character who's straight out of a sixties movie - the tough redneck southerner who finds redemption by saving a child, complete with an awful transcription of what King thinks a Southern accent sounds like.

All that said, it is entertaining and I enjoyed it.

Thanks!
post #63 of 73
For quicker reads, I suggest either The Shining or Salem's Lot. If you don't mind an epic read than it's got to be "IT".
post #64 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mute View Post
For quicker reads, I suggest either The Shining or Salem's Lot. If you don't mind an epic read than it's got to be "IT".

The enduring adoration of that book amazes me. The ending was ridiculous - a pubescent gangbang saves the town from the evil clown? Are you kidding me?
post #65 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by FLMountainMan View Post
The enduring adoration of that book amazes me. The ending was ridiculous - a pubescent gangbang saves the town from the evil clown? Are you kidding me?

I think I've been able to overlook certain... eh... parts of the book because he wrote those kids so beautifully. So I'm not defending the scene you're referring to, I'm just ignoring it. Maybe I'm biased because I remember running around with neighborhood kids, getting in fights with rival bullies down the street, playing in the woods, nearly getting killed in a cave... It is a flashback to a lot of our childhoods (minus the supernatural and other what-not) and I think King deserves credit for nailing the voices of the kids. I felt like he was writing about the fellas in my neighborhood. Maybe I'm alone, but I'm guessing there are others out there who love the book for similar reasons.

And that was one scary clown thing.
post #66 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by Verno Inferno View Post
I think I've been able to overlook certain... eh... parts of the book because he wrote those kids so beautifully. So I'm not defending the scene you're referring to, I'm just ignoring it. Maybe I'm biased because I remember running around with neighborhood kids, getting in fights with rival bullies down the street, playing in the woods, nearly getting killed in a cave... It is a flashback to a lot of our childhoods (minus the supernatural and other what-not) and I think King deserves credit for nailing the voices of the kids. I felt like he was writing about the fellas in my neighborhood. Maybe I'm alone, but I'm guessing there are others out there who love the book for similar reasons.

And that was one scary clown thing.


No, I understand what you're getting at.

Of the Stephen King I've read, there is often a sense of nostalgia that is very appealing (and universal it would appear, judging by his global success), particularly when he writes about children and childhood.

Also, as an Englishman, I enjoy both his folksy, pop culture references and the period Americana he writes about. As an 'outsider' I find the little details he includes very interesting.
post #67 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by Verno Inferno View Post
I think I've been able to overlook certain... eh... parts of the book because he wrote those kids so beautifully. So I'm not defending the scene you're referring to, I'm just ignoring it. Maybe I'm biased because I remember running around with neighborhood kids, getting in fights with rival bullies down the street, playing in the woods, nearly getting killed in a cave... It is a flashback to a lot of our childhoods (minus the supernatural and other what-not) and I think King deserves credit for nailing the voices of the kids. I felt like he was writing about the fellas in my neighborhood. Maybe I'm alone, but I'm guessing there are others out there who love the book for similar reasons.

And that was one scary clown thing.

Fair enough and I see your point. Bag of Bones has that same effect for me. It is a decent horror novel, but King's portrayal of the protaganist's grief was amazing and really touched me, so I love the book.

Perhaps part of my lack of appreciation is the fact that It is actually one of the last King books I read (and I've read them all, literally), and I was in my late twenties when I did so.And I had no friends to run around with as a child.
post #68 of 73
I think some people's problems is that they didn't naturalize themselves by reading some classic R.L. Stine works before reading King, then you'll like it more.
post #69 of 73
The Dark Tower was pretty good. Some weak points in the later books, but overall an excellent series.
post #70 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by FLMountainMan View Post
The enduring adoration of that book amazes me. The ending was ridiculous - a pubescent gangbang saves the town from the evil clown? Are you kidding me?

That's a matter of opinion. However, you're mistaking that the metaphorical virgin sacrifice saved the town. That silly scene supposedly helped the kids make their final bond so that they could continue on to the final showdown. It was this last act that first injured "IT" and eventually led to it's death.

That aside, I've not read too many books that does such a great job at portraying the traumas of childhood for outsiders. King also does an incredible job joining the past and the present to bring the parallel story lines together for a nice exciting climax.
post #71 of 73
Anyone else absolutely love Full Dark, No Stars and absolutely hate 11/22/63? The latter is the first King book I ever though about giving up on. And at the end of it, I wish I had.
post #72 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mute View Post


Quote:


Originally Posted by FLMountainMan View Post

The enduring adoration of that book amazes me. The ending was ridiculous - a pubescent gangbang saves the town from the evil clown? Are you kidding me?




That's a matter of opinion. However, you're mistaking that the metaphorical virgin sacrifice saved the town. That silly scene supposedly helped the kids make their final bond so that they could continue on to the final showdown. It was this last act that first injured "IT" and eventually led to it's death.

Both of you have it wrong. The kids defeat IT for the first time before the sexual encounter. After Bill's telepathic confrontation with IT, they leave IT's layer, not completely convinced that they managed to kill IT. As they make their way through the sewers, they come to the realization that they're lost. Bill then begins to sense that whatever bond they forged that summer is starting to disappear. They all managed to become something more than what they were, but once they drove IT back into hibernation, they reverted back into being regular, scared kids. So Beverly has sex with them as a way of rebuilding that bond, and as a way of getting back to how they had been. After it is all done, they are able to get back their bearings, and manage to get out of the sewers and back to the surface. When they go back down 27 years later, they try to achieve the opposite, this time trying to get back the spark that had existed when they were kids.
post #73 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr Huh? View Post

Both of you have it wrong. The kids defeat IT for the first time before the sexual encounter. After Bill's telepathic confrontation with IT, they leave IT's layer, not completely convinced that they managed to kill IT. As they make their way through the sewers, they come to the realization that they're lost. Bill then begins to sense that whatever bond they forged that summer is starting to disappear. They all managed to become something more than what they were, but once they drove IT back into hibernation, they reverted back into being regular, scared kids. So Beverly has sex with them as a way of rebuilding that bond, and as a way of getting back to how they had been. After it is all done, they are able to get back their bearings, and manage to get out of the sewers and back to the surface. When they go back down 27 years later, they try to achieve the opposite, this time trying to get back the spark that had existed when they were kids.

I appreciate your literalism and devotion to the source material. Allow me to correct my original post:
Quote:
Originally Posted by FLMountainMan

The enduring adoration of that book amazes me. The ending was ridiculous - a pubescent gangbang restores the kids' orienteering abilities and sense of direction? Are you kidding me?
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