or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Streetwear and Denim › Recent purchases - Part II
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Recent purchases - Part II - Page 2228

post #33406 of 44859
where should one start with ian m banks? i read one of his "culture" books, and just didnt like it, seemed so "far out". On the other hand, I loved "transition" by his other persona Ian Banks (without the M...).
post #33407 of 44859
personally I think ereaders make researching/writing an essay much harder.
post #33408 of 44859
Quote:
Originally Posted by brad-t View Post

Maybe quaint was a bad choice of words on my part. What I meant was that the same set of technologies that enables e-readers to exist is also the same set of technologies that we use to have this conversation. People have lodged similar criticisms towards internet communications.

There are some real advantages that physical books have that e-readers simply can't match but I don't think nostalgia is one of them. also I typed this with my voice

Maybe there should be an SWD reading topic?

this is not true.
post #33409 of 44859
Quote:
Originally Posted by SuperBobo View Post

Ive read a bunch of Neal Stephensons, good stuff. On a sort of related note, Im sad William Gibson abandoned cyberpunk proper...

william gibson started and ended the cyberpunk genre. everything that's been written post-neuromancer (including his own stuff) is just a pale shadow of what came before. was really a groundbreaking, incredible book. it's a shame that nothing he's written since has come close.

i'm also a fan of really old and really obscure orson scott card (planet called treason, worthing saga). he's also an underrated short story writer.
post #33410 of 44859
oh ok
post #33411 of 44859
Quote:
Originally Posted by brad-t View Post

oh ok

it's a dumb argument. there are clear advantages and disadvantages to ereaders, and readers are not an entirely new type of communication a la instant messaging/email.
post #33412 of 44859
I said that though ... oh well. This is like the last thing in the world I'm interested in arguing about.
post #33413 of 44859
also some book recs:

early stephen king is also really underrated. the long walk, the running man, thinner, his early short story collections (especially different seasons). all surprisingly good.

i used to read a ton of fantasy but I've outgrown it, although one series i always loved that nobody ever talked about was the 'monarchies of god'.

i vary between reading nonfiction and fiction, and i also read a lot of 'trashy' books. a few months ago i was more 'serious' literature, but it comes in waves. you should never be ashamed of what you're reading - the fact that you're reading at all makes you better than most. as long as you're not reading twilight or eragon.
post #33414 of 44859
^^ Too bad. (Only posting because I already wrote it, not piling on. )

It's not a nostalgia-fueled blanket condemnation of "new technology" or some shit. No one is criticizing e-readers as technological product per se, the thing can be useful and I could see myself getting one if I were to travel or something. But to me, the impact that the widespread use of this kind of product has on society, the trend it illustrates, far outweighs its very minor advantages so it's hard for me to get on board. Perfect is the enemy of good and there's no doubt in my mind that past a certain point technological advances of that kind become gimmicks more detrimental than anything, a hindrance, solutions looking for problems. As other have pointed out, I don't see the trend of turning everything into a stupid screen as a progress and the perspective of seeing physical books marginalized in favor of digitized content has worrying implications (and no, it's not comparable to music) even aside from data-collection.

I have no problems reconciling that position with my heavy internet use, probably because I see internet as an indispensable tool whereas e-readers are just redundant gadgets. Which is actually pretty sad and says a lot about how much internet fucked up my brain. I'll say this, I'm happy I got through at least part of my childhood before internet came along.
post #33415 of 44859
Quote:
Originally Posted by SuperBobo View Post

where should one start with ian m banks? i read one of his "culture" books, and just didnt like it, seemed so "far out". On the other hand, I loved "transition" by his other persona Ian Banks (without the M...).

Hmm, would like to know which one you read. The more recent Culture stuff I haven't liked personally, but Use of Weapons is the best of them in my opinion. Definitely read that or Player of Games. Only read the earlier books under his Iain Banks moniker - Wasp Factory, Walking on Glass, The Bridge, Complicity and A Song of Stone. Transition is on my "to pick up" list though.
post #33416 of 44859
Quote:
Originally Posted by Teger View Post

william gibson started and ended the cyberpunk genre. everything that's been written post-neuromancer (including his own stuff) is just a pale shadow of what came before. was really a groundbreaking, incredible book. it's a shame that nothing he's written since has come close.

i'm also a fan of really old and really obscure orson scott card (planet called treason, worthing saga). he's also an underrated short story writer.

break a butterfly?
post #33417 of 44859
Quote:
Originally Posted by Synthese View Post

break a butterfly?

? foo.gif

also vernor vince has some good stuff.
post #33418 of 44859
only read the ender's series, been meaning to check out his other stuff.
post #33419 of 44859
all of his modern stuff is shit, he's kind of a crazy neocon mormon and he wrote a ton of books basically retelling mormon mythology. he's not a very good writer, but the early stuff has a scope and inventiveness that's lacking from everything post speaker of the dead.

look at 'a planet called treason' and 'the worthing saga.' both are $4 or so shipped on half.com. seriously though, if you like darker/dystopian scifi buy stephen king's 'the long walk.'

pournelle and niven have some good stuff - footfall (a little hokey), lucifer's hammer and their best, a mote in god's eye/the gripping hand. i don't know if you can really call lucifer's hammer 'scifi' though.
post #33420 of 44859
There comes a point where you just have to put down the ancillary stuff and finish the essential. Proust, man. The whole of Proust. Now, rather than later, because one day, you will die.

(I know it's dorky, but it bears repeating).

I also don't think it's wrong or ironic or hypocritical that one prefers books, but uses the Internet, even excessively. I mean, the Internet is great for talking about things, but it is not the thing, if that makes sense. Giving up on books would change us.

This is hard to summarize on a phone. shog[1].gif
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Streetwear and Denim
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Streetwear and Denim › Recent purchases - Part II