or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › Books on style
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Books on style

post #1 of 32
Thread Starter 
Here is my current (small) collection:



Any recommendations on future purchases?
post #2 of 32
'Morning, John...a couple of additions:

Clothes and the Man by Alan Flusser
Gentleman's Guide To Grooming and Style by Bernhard Roetzel
Men's Wardrobe by Kim Johnson Gross & Jeff Stone
Dress Smart Men by Kim Johnson Gross & Jeff Stone
Grant by Taschen (all about Cary Grant's clothes collection and suits in the movies. Did you know.....)

T
post #3 of 32
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tshaw View Post
'Morning, John...a couple of additions:

Clothes and the Man by Alan Flusser
Gentleman's Guide To Grooming and Style by Bernhard Roetzel
Men's Wardrobe by Kim Johnson Gross & Jeff Stone
Dress Smart Men by Kim Johnson Gross & Jeff Stone
Grant by Taschen (all about Cary Grant's clothes collection and suits in the movies. Did you know.....)

T

Thanks tshaw. Isn't Clothes and the man out of print though?

Grant by Taschen... nice
post #4 of 32
After a certain point, there really isn't much point.
post #5 of 32
The New English Dandy with Andreas Kronthaler on zee front, I really enjoyed this one. It breaks down the different styles of dandy and provides some nice history about where the movement came from.
post #6 of 32
Save for the Nordstrom book, you've got a good, solid collection there. You'll find the most value at the margin from the following tomes in descending order of utility: Francois Chaille, The Book of Ties (Flammarian, 1994). There isn't a lot to know about suits when it comes right down to it. There are only a few choices to make and it's pretty easy to navigate those choices with the books you have. But how to best match a shirt and tie - particularly the tie! - with the same is the real art of dressing. This book goes into great depth on this subject; more than anything else out there that I am aware of. While this is more history and survey than a "how to dress" guide, it offers valuable thoughts on that subject. Riccardo Villarosa & Giuliano Angeli, The Elegant Man: How to Construct the Ideal Wardrobe (Random House, 1990) - One of the very best books on the subject and also covering ground - particularly regarding fabrics - only lightly covered by your other books. Alan Flusser, Clothes and the Man: The Principles of Fine Men's Dress (Villard, 1985). Many argue this is a better book than Dressing the Man, but I'm not so sure. There are a some issues addressed here - like what an ideal businessman's wardrobe might look like as far as suits, shirts, and ties are concerned - that are not addressed by Flusser in his most recent tome, and some other areas that get a bit more attention here than there. But there are other issues - like personal color considerations and pattern matching - that got more attention in Dressing the Man. Hence, it's worthwhile I think to get both despite the large degree of overlap. Eric Musgrave, Sharp Suits (Pavilion, 2009). Light on text but heavy on inspirational photographs. Much can be learned here regarding style by just thumbing through this beautiful and reasonably thick coffee table book. G. Bruce Boyer, Elegance: A Guide to Quality in Menswear (W.W. Norton, 1985). A collection of Boyers' essays on menswear from Town & Country. He goes into a some depth on issues that get only cursory attention elsewhere. For instance, there are thoughtful and intelligent essays here on double-breasted suits, seersucker suits, Italian style, etc. You will find some areas of disagreement between Boyer and some of the other style icons out there like Alan Flusser (for instance, regarding shirt collar guidelines), but not too many. Hardy Amies, ABC of Men's Fashion (Abrams, 2007). An interesting albeit idiosyncratic take on men's fashion and classical style originally published in 1964. Lots of useful advice on oft-overlooked matters and arguments regarding color and wardrobe construction that you won't find anywhere else. Of course, that might have something to do with the fact that Amies' views are ... idiosyncratic. But they are interesting and informed. Paul Keers, A Gentleman's Wardrobe: Classic Clothes and the Modern Man (Weidenfeld & Nicolson, 1987). Another book that covers the soup-to-nuts Flusser and Roetzel ground but whereas Flusser comes at this with an American take and Roetzel from a continental angle, Keers brings a distinct English sensibility to these issues. The result is a somewhat different set of opinions about many matters but nothing too terribly at odds with the rest. There are some interesting opinions offered here and there, however, that you won't find too often elsewhere (but not quite as many idiosyncratic bon mots as might be found in Amies). G. Bruce Boyer, Eminently Suitable (W.W. Norton, 1990). Covering the same issues covered by Manton's The Suit but with somewhat different angles at times. No fundamental disagreements between the two, however. Until The Suit, this was the book on the subject. Now, it's mostly overlap. Had The Suit not been published, this would have been at the top of my list. It's less useful to you now, however, but if you are obsessive on the topic, then you will want this for footnotes to Manton. There are a couple of other books on two rather inspirational style icons that will be quite useful depending upon your personal style: Richard Torregrossa, Cary Grant: A Celebration of Style (Bulfinch Press, 2006). The book has been criticized by some for being a bit frothy and inaccurate, and while there is some truth to that, it is still a useful tome on how to make Grant's elegant simplicity work for you. If you like his style - or James Bond's or Douglas Fairbanks' or Gianni Agnelli's - then this book will help show you how to do it. And it will also tell you about Grant's life and personality and that's always a delightful matter to chew over. G. Bruce Boyer, Fred Astaire Style (Assouline, 2004). As above but without the criticism for occasional inaccuracies. Short but sweet. Astaire has an entirely different look than the icons mentioned above but he is their equal in every way. Very heavy on inspirational photos but light on text. Still worth getting IMO. There are a few others out there worth reading if you're an obsessive, but these will give you the most to chew over.
post #7 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by tshaw View Post
Gentleman's Guide To Grooming and Style by Bernhard Roetzel

This one is the same as "Gentleman" in the OP's pic, only pre-revision. It's been published with a couple different covers/titles. Great book.
post #8 of 32
It is somewhat outdated now, but Dress for Success is a worthwhile read. If nothing else, it is unintentionally funny.
post #9 of 32
I like the picture in the OP I also recommend Eric Musgrave's Sharp Suits, there are some great photos. J. your otherwise great list neglected Manton's book, The Suit, which is a really great read.
post #10 of 32
The OP already has The Suit. It's right there on the stack.

Yes, it's a fine book, drape fetish and all.
post #11 of 32
Quote:
It is somewhat outdated now, but Dress for Success is a worthwhile read. If nothing else, it is unintentionally funny
No need to buy the book. If you want to dress in a way that gives the least amount of offense while capturing the greatest amount of respect, turn on CNN, see what the politicians are wearing, and dress like them. They are wearing what countless focus groups and psychologists report as the most successful ensembles at accomplishing just that. I'll save you some time. Wear a charcoal grey suit. Single breasted only. Wear a moderately bright red tie. Wear a white shirt. Unfortunately, you can't get away with wearing this every day. So buy a red tie with some white stripes. Buy a royal blue tie. Then buy a few different shades of red if you feel like spreading your wings a little. And to give your charcoal grey suit a rest every other day, buy a navy blue single breasted while you're at it. Oh, and if you stray from a plain worsted weave, I will hunt you down ....
post #12 of 32
I second the recommendation for Hardy Amies ABC...
post #13 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by J. Cogburn View Post
The OP already has The Suit. It's right there on the stack.

Yes, it's a fine book, drape fetish and all.

Whoops, I thought you were making your own list of books and wondered why you neglected the aforementioned one. You were apparently just making his fine collection more comprehensive
post #14 of 32
I liked Men's Style by Russell Smith.
post #15 of 32
How is the nordstrom's book?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Classic Menswear
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › Books on style