or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Culture › Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel › Guide to Buying Canned Sardines
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Guide to Buying Canned Sardines - Page 7

post #91 of 159
Quote:
Originally Posted by forex View Post
Those are great,I happened to pick them up at a local store couple of weeks ago,love'em.
Do you like?
They were great. Better than the other Riga Sprats, another brand, I had last week. Texture was better.
post #92 of 159
picked up some of the standard riga sprats online. although I paid almost $3/can, which is considerably more than some of you guys, I really like them. Much better than what's available at my local supermarket for that price.
post #93 of 159
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by robertorex View Post
picked up some of the standard riga sprats online. although I paid almost $3/can, which is considerably more than some of you guys, I really like them. Much better than what's available at my local supermarket for that price.

Canned goods are one of the few foods I'd ever consider buying over the Internet.
post #94 of 159
Bump.
Quote:
Originally Posted by why View Post
4. Poland
Polish varieties tend to be fished from the Baltic Sea and are usually sprats or brisling. I've seen only a few Polish varieties and the fish are as good quality as the Baltic States', but Poland tends to be cheap when they process their fish. I've only ever seen them in vegetable oil (likely soybean or canola) and I've only seen them unsmoked. The biggest importer of Polish sardines in the United States is Seasons' Brand, which for some reason prices their sardines above the value of their quality of processing

The local grocery chain happens to sell this for a song. I finally got around to try it today, on RyKrisp rye crackers w/ mustard.


Prettay good.
post #95 of 159
I finally found Riga sprats, and they are AMAZING. In the past few weeks, I've gone on a sardine-eating adventure. They're actually the core of what I eat now. Thank you, why!
post #96 of 159
post #97 of 159
As a kid growing up my dad used to always eat these. But as I have gotten older I just can't stand the smell. Not sure how I feel about them as I like the taste but the only way I can stand to eat them is with a clothes pin stuck to my nose, one whiff and I am done for.
post #98 of 159
Had some 'Cole's Sardines' today. Best I've had in my journey thus far.
post #99 of 159
I picked up some Riga Sprats the other day (after being reminded of them by this thread). They're as delicious as always, but at this point I'm just eating them on bread or crackers. Are there any suggestions on more 'fancier' ways of eating them? Any cheeses that complement them well?
post #100 of 159
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by arced View Post
I picked up some Riga Sprats the other day (after being reminded of them by this thread). They're as delicious as always, but at this point I'm just eating them on bread or crackers. Are there any suggestions on more 'fancier' ways of eating them? Any cheeses that complement them well?
Definitely not cheese, but a good lager complements them very well. They're among the few foods that I think beer naturally pairs with (bratwurst and some other Nordic and Germanic foods do as well).
post #101 of 159
Quote:
Originally Posted by why View Post
Definitely not cheese, but a good lager complements them very well. They're among one of the few foods that I think beer naturally pairs with (bratwurst and some other Nordic and Germanic foods do as well).

Ok... maybe cheese isn't the best, but there's got to be something more than "serve on a cracker." I do agree with the beer suggestion.
post #102 of 159
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by arced View Post
Ok... maybe cheese isn't the best, but there's got to be something more than "serve on a cracker." I do agree with the beer suggestion.
Sauteed onions work decently well with them, but they drastically alter the flavor. I'd still have them on bread or crackers if I add onions, but personally I think the onions are just a distraction for people that don't enjoy their pure seafood taste. Ditto for lemon. They are good alongside pierogies, different preparations of potatoes (including latkes), and (of course) salads. I like them with sauteed peas and onions, soups, dumplings, etc. Basically, they work with starches, some vegetables, and spices. That's pretty much how it goes for all fish, especially smoked oily fish. Oddly, they don't work as well with eggs as other smoked fish but they can still work. Hard-boiled eggs seem to work better than fried or poached in terms of flavor and fussiness. All said, I prefer them on rye with lager. Secondarily, I like them alongside sauteed pierogies, peas, and onions (though in this case, I often prefer vodka as a drink -- one of the few times I actually enjoy vodka neat).
post #103 of 159
I've made a tart with them, on top of sauteed onions, on top of phyllo. It was good, and looked great. I prefer them on black bread with beer.
post #104 of 159
Is there any documented long term health effects from eating canned foodstuff? urban myth?
post #105 of 159
wow, thanks for writing this up! I have never had sardines but I am gonna have to try some
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
Styleforum › Forums › Culture › Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel › Guide to Buying Canned Sardines