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Guide to Buying Canned Sardines - Page 9

post #121 of 157
Saw this the other day: http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/320712
Some guy has tried 50 some odd cans over a period of time and ranked them (though I question his ability to rank 50 cans having only tried each once...I can't remember the differences between the 3-4 types of sardines I ate for christmas).

Today I had some more...I bought a few different ones at the grocery to test vs the king oscar I am used to. I finished the second half of a can of some trader joes brand smoked sardines on a piece of bread with butter. These are pretty good but it is fake smoke.

Then I had a piece of bread with some Brunswick in olive oil and a Becks. These weren't bad but weren't especially amazing either. Following a recommendation in one of those chowhound posts, I threw the rest of the can in with some cream cheese and mixed it into a spread...this was mediocre. Maybe teh brunswick's just don't have enough flavor (or I used too much cream cheese...) but the spread was pretty "meh" compared to just eating them with bread and butter.

Would like some other varieties (and some riga sprats) but I'll have to find a store that sells more.
post #122 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by j View Post
I have always bought canned fish pretty much randomly and probably don't know if I've been eating good or bad ones, but the Brunswick are acceptable enough that I keep buying them. I would love it if there is something better out there, especially if it is cheapish.

I can't get over the posts from people eating Brunswick sardines, which are to sardines what the American Budweiser is to beer. If you want to go for sardines that are easily available, try the Club des Millionaires sprats, which are decently smoked and have some taste to them. Here in Canada, Loblaw's used to stock some 99 cent cans of Polish sardines, which were a great bargain. Since they discontinued them, I am forced into speciality stores to find Riga sprats for over $2.50 a can. Still, lots more bang for the buck than the tasteless Brunswick sardines.
post #123 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by latkaguy View Post
I can't get over the posts from people eating Brunswick sardines, which are to sardines what the American Budweiser is to beer. If you want to go for sardines that are easily available, try the Club des Millionaires sprats, which are decently smoked and have some taste to them. Here in Canada, Loblaw's used to stock some 99 cent cans of Polish sardines, which were a great bargain. Since they discontinued them, I am forced into speciality stores to find Riga sprats for over $2.50 a can. Still, lots more bang for the buck than the tasteless Brunswick sardines.

I eat Brunswick sardines because 1) they're cheap, 2) I like them, and 3) they make for a quick breakfast when I only have a couple minutes for breakfast.
post #124 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by BDC2823 View Post
I eat Brunswick sardines because 1) they're cheap, 2) I like them, and 3) they make for a quick breakfast when I only have a couple minutes for breakfast.

Lots of people eat corn flakes for breakfast. They are cheap, quick and many people like them. It doesn't mean that they taste as good as blini with caviar. At $2.50 a can (and some people are reporting here that they can get them much cheaper), Riga sprats aren't going to break the bank, and they are much, much better than Brunswick sardines. But if you like starting the day with something bland, more power to you. I just find it a mystery why anyone would.
post #125 of 157
JFC dude.
post #126 of 157
I don't think I've ever seen the Club des Millionaires sprats anywhere, and when I search the first hit is this page, so I don't think they are as ubiquitous as you think they are. The main reason people eat the Brunswick ones is probably because that is what is available at the store where they shop. If my stores had better stuff I would buy it (within reason for price), but I am cheap and don't want to shop at expensive food stores all the time, so to get good canned fish I have to make special trips. FWIW one of the types listed on one list as almost the best, I tried, and were extremely boring. Something Portugese, can't remember the name now. Yellow box.
post #127 of 157
Well, they are pretty common in grocery stores in Ontario, although not as ubiquitous as they used to be. I am pleased to have discovered this past weekend that a branch of Loblaw's in the west end of Ottawa is now carrying Riga sprats for $1.99 a can, which is cheaper than at Eastern European delis locally. So I bought half a dozen cans. They were in a section with Polish foods, and not with the other canned fish, so maybe I've just been looking for sardines in all the wrong places -- sort of like looking for love in all the wrong places. :-)
post #128 of 157
Bamp

Picked up Riga Gold sprats today when I saw them at a local grocer. Had completely forgotten about them the past few years. Even after a three course meal at home along with dessert, I just scarfed down a couple with some wine.
post #129 of 157
Gentlemen,

I am not a consumer of canned meat; the idea is just wholly unappetizing. And, here, we're talking fish of all things ... from a can.

Yet with all the enthusiasm, I feel drawn, almost compelled to give these a try. I'll report back in a couple of weeks or months, however long it takes me to get up the courage. But I do have this on my list of things to do.

Cheers!
post #130 of 157
http://www.chow.com/food-news/47126/7-things-to-do-with-canned-sardines/
post #131 of 157

Whoa. Sardines ... and nuts.

You people are serious.
Quote:
Seanuts
1476347

Inspired by CHOW's Chile-Lime Peanuts. Try them for your next cocktail party. Makes 10 to 15 servings as a snack.

Heat the oven to 400°F and arrange a rack in the middle. Toss together two cans of drained and chopped sardines, two pounds of peanuts, 20 unpeeled garlic cloves, six tablespoons of peanut oil, and four crushed arbol chiles until evenly coated. Spread the ingredients out on a baking sheet in a single layer and roast, shaking and stirring halfway through, until the nuts are toasted and beginning to crack open, about 25 minutes. Remove from the oven and transfer to a large, heatproof bowl. Toss with three tablespoons of finely grated lime zest, four teaspoons of kosher salt, and four teaspoons of sugar and serve.
post #132 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by razl View Post

Gentlemen,
I am not a consumer of canned meat; the idea is just wholly unappetizing. And, here, we're talking fish of all things ... from a can.
Yet with all the enthusiasm, I feel drawn, almost compelled to give these a try. I'll report back in a couple of weeks or months, however long it takes me to get up the courage. But I do have this on my list of things to do.
Cheers!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W-ZusZJloHg
post #133 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trompe le Monde View Post

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W-ZusZJloHg

Bravo! My ongoing education of how little I actually know, about anything it seems, marches on. I can take a little solace in that my impression was the same a Bourdain's, but now I'm a convert. Well, maybe not a $200+ a tin convert...
post #134 of 157
This thread made me get some sardines today. So hard to find non Moroccan ones in Indiana but the local supermarket came through icon_gu_b_slayer[1].gif

Ran low on cash near the end of my semester in Barcelona, sustained a month on sardines, anchovies and tuna.
Also was there every a post made about anchovies?
post #135 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by stevent View Post

Ran low on cash near the end of my semester in Barcelona, sustained a month on sardines, anchovies and tuna.

given what i know about the high quality of canned seafood in spain, if i ever went to barcelona, i would probably do the same.
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