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Wolverine 1000 Mile Boot Review - Page 505

post #7561 of 7742
Quote:
Originally Posted by Newberry View Post



On their main site you can actually look it up Cordovan No. 8 but in the pic you posted, I'm thinking it looks more like Rust. Still great looking boots and a steal for 140
Quote:
Originally Posted by Newberry View Post



On their main site you can actually look it up Cordovan No. 8 but in the pic you posted, I'm thinking it looks more like Rust. Still great looking boots and a steal for 140

I hope they're as light as they look, I already have a pair of Rust that look like black cherry/cordovan 8 because they're so dark. I got these to put half soles on and have a switch up for my daily footwear so hopefully it works out. If not I'll be listing them for sale on here.
post #7562 of 7742
Quote:
Originally Posted by tps3443 View Post

These boots are not real cordovan. But, that's OK! They are great boots, either way, they are Horween chromexcel leather. And they are 1000 mile boots. Good year welted, and built in USA.

They made a limited 721 model of the Wolverine 1000 mile boots they were $721 new,and IN THE MUCH DESIRED REAL SHELL CORDOVAN! They only made 1,000 pairs.

Either way $140 is a good buy. They may be factory seconds, or defective. But this happens alot with Wolverine 1000 mile boots. In order to get a perfect first quality pair of Wolverine 1000 mile boots, you gotta pay full MSRP.

I just paid $326 buying direct from Wolverine , and they were defective! Waiting on the exchanges to come back..

Shell Cordovan is expensive. Your gonna pay the price for the qualities. But I'm still really fond of the chromexcel leather.

It's look to me that you got a good pair, with only a little loose grain creasing on the left boot " thick wrinkles" but, it's not very bad. This is the reason I exchanged mine. But, it was much much more severe. And considering I paid full retail, it was not acceptable.


Enjoy!

$140 was a steal! Enjoy one of the best boots made! I love mine. Can't wait to get them back.

I'm pretty happy with them. I have two other pairs of 1k's but none this color, I think, but I'm not sure what color this is because I was told "cordovan."
They were a display model in a shop, so they've been tried on and such but for $140 I'll gladly buy another pair. Thanks for the reply. I would totally get a pair of Shell Cordovan's if they didn't have the wingtip toe caps - and if I could find a pair.
post #7563 of 7742

anyone had steel shanks added to their special edtion boots (cordovan 744 and 721)?

post #7564 of 7742
One year of wear on my Wolverine 1ks. I've had these just over a year now, so decided to take a few pictures. I don't wear them every day, but they probably have 80+ wears. They are my lightest, most comfortable boot, so I often wear them traveling. I've also worn them on some light hikes, but mostly I wear them at work and around town.

They were 2nds quality from Sierra Trading Post, but only had a few scuffs near the welt which are now invisible. My care routine is to brush off with a horsehair brush at the end of the day, condition occasionally with Lexol, and occasionally use a little Meltonian black cream polish to put a shine on them. This hides the CXLs tendency to have lighter-colored scuffs, which some people like, but I'm happy keeping these all black. You have to be careful and conservative when applying to keep the white stitching white.

I had a Vibram mini-lug half-sole glued on at a local cobbler for $35, which has been nice. I don't worry so much about the leather sole anymore, and since they did a clean glue-up and trim it looks completely stock.

Sizing was a bit tricky. I'm a 6.5C on the Brannock, and these are size 6.5. Ideally a 6.0 would fit me better, but these were close, and the 6.0s are quite rare (and always full price). I used some 3mm merino wool felt from Etsy to cut a thin insole, and glue in a thin heel pad, which pushes my foot up and forward slightly. This has worked out great, and they are now among my better fitting boots. Would have been nice to get the right size from the beginning, but this solution works better than the extra $150 I would have had to pay to get a 6.0.

Laces are waxed brown laces from TZ Laces.




post #7565 of 7742
Quote:
Originally Posted by sleepyinsanfran View Post

anyone had steel shanks added to their special edtion boots (cordovan 744 and 721)?

Why do you want a steel shank? I've heard from a few bootmakers that a good fiberglass shank works just as well, but that they are forced to keep using steel simply because people think it is better. If you did want one put in, it would have to be associated with a complete rebuild, which would be pretty costly. I'm sure some of the more adventurous cobblers like Brian the Bootmaker could do it.
post #7566 of 7742
Quote:
Originally Posted by phidauex View Post

One year of wear on my Wolverine 1ks. I've had these just over a year now, so decided to take a few pictures. I don't wear them every day, but they probably have 80+ wears. They are my lightest, most comfortable boot, so I often wear them traveling. I've also worn them on some light hikes, but mostly I wear them at work and around town.

They were 2nds quality from Sierra Trading Post, but only had a few scuffs near the welt which are now invisible. My care routine is to brush off with a horsehair brush at the end of the day, condition occasionally with Lexol, and occasionally use a little Meltonian black cream polish to put a shine on them. This hides the CXLs tendency to have lighter-colored scuffs, which some people like, but I'm happy keeping these all black. You have to be careful and conservative when applying to keep the white stitching white.

I had a Vibram mini-lug half-sole glued on at a local cobbler for $35, which has been nice. I don't worry so much about the leather sole anymore, and since they did a clean glue-up and trim it looks completely stock.

Sizing was a bit tricky. I'm a 6.5C on the Brannock, and these are size 6.5. Ideally a 6.0 would fit me better, but these were close, and the 6.0s are quite rare (and always full price). I used some 3mm merino wool felt from Etsy to cut a thin insole, and glue in a thin heel pad, which pushes my foot up and forward slightly. This has worked out great, and they are now among my better fitting boots. Would have been nice to get the right size from the beginning, but this solution works better than the extra $150 I would have had to pay to get a 6.0.

Laces are waxed brown laces from TZ Laces.






They look awesome for wearing at least 80 times. Actually better than new!! I'm still in search of a nice good used pair.
post #7567 of 7742
Quote:
Originally Posted by phidauex View Post

Why do you want a steel shank? I've heard from a few bootmakers that a good fiberglass shank works just as well, but that they are forced to keep using steel simply because people think it is better. If you did want one put in, it would have to be associated with a complete rebuild, which would be pretty costly. I'm sure some of the more adventurous cobblers like Brian the Bootmaker could do it.

Yea Brian has done a ton of 1Ks, including mine, and he always uses a steel shank.
post #7568 of 7742
Quote:
Originally Posted by cthip View Post

Yea Brian has done a ton of 1Ks, including mine, and he always uses a steel shank.

Nice, how did it turn out? What kind of sole did you go with?
post #7569 of 7742
In a word, KILLER. Breathed new life into some well-worn boots.

Here are some before/afters from earlier in this thread:

http://www.styleforum.net/t/163864/wolverine-1000-mile-boot-review/7230#post_7823914

There are better photos on Brian's instagram too if you scroll back about a year.

Now, I can't say how much of that improvement is specifically due to the steel shank. Perhaps the boots would be just as good with a fiberglass shank, I really don't know. I can say with certainty that I've added a ton of weight to the boots. Out-of-the-box the 1Ks are relatively lightweight boots. Adding the Vibram lugged sole and the steel shank made them significantly heavier. They're still wearable all-day (and I walk a lot) but it's a noticeable difference that you should keep in mind if you're thinking about going this route..
post #7570 of 7742
I'd love to find a good beat up pair that I could restore. I don't even can what size they are. I need the practice. Lol.
post #7571 of 7742

OK guys I have my first challenge on cleaning and conditioning a pair of beat up boots....any suggestions?

post #7572 of 7742
Cleaners - I have variously used water, Saphir Renomat, Lexol and Obenauf''s

Conditioners - I have variously used RM Williams, Lexol, Obenauf's oil and HDLP , Huberts, and Saphir Renovateur

For boots like those that I would wear as work boots and not fashion items, I'd probably just clean with water and then apply some Obenauf's HDLP (mainly because I have plenty of HDLP to hand)
post #7573 of 7742
First I brushed them good, then wiped them down with a damp cloth. Washed them using saddle soap which almost turned them white. I let them dry over night and will continue tonight. Attached 2 pic. Before I started and after the saddle soap washing. [IMG]
post #7574 of 7742
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chawk806 View Post

OK guys I have my first challenge on cleaning and conditioning a pair of beat up boots....any suggestions?

I have a nail brush that I use for cleaning boots (it used to be my wife's, until I started cleaning boots with it and she made me buy her a new one), it is good for scrubbing, but not so aggressive that it will damage anything. For soap, if it is needed I often use unscented hand soap. It is a bit more gentle than saddle soap, but still gives you an edge over water alone.
post #7575 of 7742
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chawk806 View Post

First I brushed them good, then wiped them down with a damp cloth. Washed them using saddle soap which almost turned them white. I let them dry over night and will continue tonight. Attached 2 pic. Before I started and after the saddle soap washing.

Those look really dry. Obenhaufs is a good leather treatment, but it doesn't soak in as much as some others will. I'd probably do a round or two of Lexol, which seems to penetrate very deeply into the leather, before doing a final coat of Obenhaufs.
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