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Wolverine 1000 Mile Boot Review - Page 335

post #5011 of 6652
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crane's View Post

Ignore it. It goes away after a few required treatments. Don't ever keep dumping oil on them to try to even out any initial spotting. Go ahead and LP them. Oil is your primary conditioner.. LP or snoseal is used to proof them and you might do that once a year. I tend to proof my boots twice a year. Once in late Fall and then again just before the Spring Missouri muck season begins.

What do you mean with required treatments? Why are these required?

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Crane's View Post

Wolverine does not recommend neatsfoot oil by the way. The reason why i use Filson boot oil is because it was specifically designed to treat full grain vegetable tanned leather. I also have an endless supply of it. If I didn't I would be using Obenauf's products exclusively.

Horween does recommend neatsfoot oil and mentions venetian shoe cream for conditioning chromexcel. Why don't you use them?

 

Sorry, I'm just curious as to your recommendations

post #5012 of 6652
Quote:
Originally Posted by anrobit View Post
 

What do you mean with required treatments? Why are these required?

 

 

 

Because everyone that wears these boots are loggers.

 

You really trust a guy that does THIS to their color 8 shell cordovans?

 

http://www.flickr.com/photos/dysong/6964607608/in/set-72157625089358107

post #5013 of 6652
Quote:
Originally Posted by themonster View Post
 

 

Because everyone that wears these boots are loggers.

 

You really trust a guy that does THIS to their color 8 shell cordovans?

 

http://www.flickr.com/photos/dysong/6964607608/in/set-72157625089358107

I'm being a little facetious, I know all about what Crane's did to those poor shell boots. 

 

I don't think people realize that the Wolverine 1000 mile line is a fashion line, not a workboot line. I would never LP any of my fashion boots.

post #5014 of 6652
Quote:
Originally Posted by anrobit View Post

I don't think people realize that the Wolverine 1000 mile line is a fashion line, not a workboot line.

lurker[1].gif

Oh good, my favorite show is about to start.
post #5015 of 6652
Quote:
Originally Posted by wdahab View Post

Pro-method for getting some cheap W1K's right now through Nordstrom.
Basically, shoerepertoire.com is having a 40% off sale, but they have terrible inventory control and often awful customer support. But you can price match deals through Nordstrom.
Great deal! Comes out to $219.95 shipped for the original 1ks. Probably will never see a price like this again. Unfortunately, most sizes out of stock in Cordovan 8 so I can't get a Nordstrom price match. facepalm.gif
post #5016 of 6652
Quote:
Originally Posted by anrobit View Post

What do you mean with required treatments? Why are these required?


Horween does recommend neatsfoot oil and mentions venetian shoe cream for conditioning chromexcel. Why don't you use them?

Sorry, I'm just curious as to your recommendations

I'll answer your questions with a question. What do you think is going to happen to the leather when the oils and waxes that are in it oxidiize and dry out?

Why would I use a product that contains turpentine as a leather conditioner? Why would I use neatsfoot oil when that product has a tendency to rot when exposed to perspiration or water allowing bacteria and fungi to grow? I already explained why I use Filson boot oil. It was specifically made to condition full grain vegetable tanned leather.

Quote:
Originally Posted by themonster View Post

Because everyone that wears these boots are loggers.

You really trust a guy that does THIS to their color 8 shell cordovans?

http://www.flickr.com/photos/dysong/6964607608/in/set-72157625089358107

You are becoming quite the troll while showing your complete lack of knowledge on leather and it's care in general. Aren't you the same clown that said they had a pair of 1K boots that got completely destroyed by street salt in Chicago? Why is it that my boots are exposed to that on a regular basis and even nastier environmental hazards and I don't have that problem? Keep right on going with your would you trust this guy who does this shit. The fact of the matter is I have clearly demonstrated just how much these boots can take and with a little cleanup they look just fine.

Quote:
Originally Posted by anrobit View Post

I'm being a little facetious, I know all about what Crane's did to those poor shell boots. 

I don't think people realize that the Wolverine 1000 mile line is a fashion line, not a workboot line. I would never LP any of my fashion boots.

They are marketed that way and that is all. The boots are a heritage line. Those standard 1000 mile boots were introduced in 1914 as a premium workboot made out of shell cordovan. We actually sold the original 1914 boot and you can bet the farm they weren't sold as a fashion item.

Quote:
Originally Posted by wdahab View Post

lurker[1].gif

Oh good, my favorite show is about to start.

LOL! I'm not going to waste my time this go around.
post #5017 of 6652
This seems pretty simple to me

If you intend to out your boots through rough conditions (wearing multiple times a week, exposing them to water, dirt and mud, using them as actual work boots, etc), the treatment methods advocated by Crane seem incredibly useful

If you intended to wear your boots as basically dress casual shoes and want to preserve some of the "break in" aesthetics of whatever leather the boot is (pull up, oily quality or CXL and the shiny glow of cordovan), other methods of care may be preferable. Over at the Alden thread, no one uses Snoseal or Obenauf, but obviously those guys are wearing shoes and boots differently than many on this thread

No need for contentious debate
post #5018 of 6652
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alcibiades View Post

This seems pretty simple to me

If you intend to out your boots through rough conditions (wearing multiple times a week, exposing them to water, dirt and mud, using them as actual work boots, etc), the treatment methods advocated by Crane seem incredibly useful

If you intended to wear your boots as basically dress casual shoes and want to preserve some of the "break in" aesthetics of whatever leather the boot is (pull up, oily quality or CXL and the shiny glow of cordovan), other methods of care may be preferable. Over at the Alden thread, no one uses Snoseal or Obenauf, but obviously those guys are wearing shoes and boots differently than many on this thread

No need for contentious debate

I actually recommend treating your boots in the manner I describe to anyone. The simple reason is mitigation versus having to deal with something as a reaction to a situation. Some of the nastiest garbage I have ever stepped in was in a city environment. Some bar floors resemble a cesspool. A walk in a park might mean you step in a pile of dog crap or black goo mud. Plain and simply there is no harm done by the apparent overkill that I recommend. It only takes one incident to completely screw up dry or untreated/lightly treated leather.
post #5019 of 6652
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crane's View Post

I actually recommend treating your boots in the manner I describe to anyone. The simple reason is mitigation versus having to deal with something as a reaction to a situation. Some of the nastiest garbage I have ever stepped in was in a city environment. Some bar floors resemble a cesspool. A walk in a park might mean you step in a pile of dog crap or black goo mud. Plain and simply there is no harm done by the apparent overkill that I recommend. It only takes one incident to completely screw up dry or untreated/lightly treated leather.

These are all fair points. The only concern I would have is the impact of treatment on the color and break in of the leather. For example, would a heavily treated pair of CXL boots end up with the kind of shine and color seen here (I'm asking as I don't know):

IMG_0196.JPG

I would be even more concerned with the impact of waterproofing methods on the aesthetics of cordovan and calfskin. For example I've haven't heard of people treating their Trickers or Edward Green "country boots" with heavy waterproofer. That said, I do use products like Alden's "leather protecter" and various suede sprays to protect against elements,

At that point, it is up to the wearer to determine the costs and benefits of particular treatment methods.
post #5020 of 6652
You can get one helluva shine on treated CXL. Mario is a master of that. Now the thing with CXL is it doesn't take to being shined up. It's just the nature of that particular leather. Shell cordovan is another heavily waxed and oiled vegetable tanned leather just like CXL. Shell by it's very nature is much more resistant to water because of it's structure. This structure is also why it's regarded as a low maintenance leather. You still have to replace the lost oils and waxes when needed or you end up destroying it. The disconnect is people think low maintenance equals no maintenance. This is why you keep hearing about vintage shell shoes just self destructing after a few wears. The leather has been neglected and it's most likely dry rotted. It could look brand new but what the surface looks like is a poor indicator of whether or not the leather has been seriously compromised. Leather is one of those things that tend to self destruct from within and by the time you actually see damage the item is usually good for the garbage can and that's about it.

People also spend entirely too much time worrying about color. These types of leather darken or change color from exposure to the elements and sun. It's an absolute exercise in futility to try and stop this from happening. It is the nature of the leather and that really is that. Shell looks like crap in my opinion when it's new. After a decade of use a well cared for shell item develops that awesome patina that is so sought after. Most of your full grain vegetable tanned leathers do this. Plain and simply if you cannot live with this then this type of leather is not for you. You would be better off with some corrected grain glazed shoes or boots.

If the calfskin item is full grain, full aniline and vegetable tanned then it's treated the same way as any other full grain, full aniline vegetable tanned leather. If it's chrome tanned, corrected, surface dyed and glazed the care regimen is entirely different. This is why it is important to know exactly what you have in your hand.
post #5021 of 6652
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crane's View Post


I actually recommend treating your boots in the manner I describe to anyone. The simple reason is mitigation versus having to deal with something as a reaction to a situation. Some of the nastiest garbage I have ever stepped in was in a city environment. Some bar floors resemble a cesspool. A walk in a park might mean you step in a pile of dog crap or black goo mud. Plain and simply there is no harm done by the apparent overkill that I recommend. It only takes one incident to completely screw up dry or untreated/lightly treated leather.
 
All I'm doing is asking questions.
 

I agree on VSC; I don't like it as a product either. However, Nick Horween himself says he uses it. Merely something that warrants consideration. If neatsfoot oil is rotting on your shoes, you are using too much. Filson boot oil may have been specifically made to condition full grain veg tan leather, but what's in it? I use none of the above as my conditioners.

 

Let's not resort to insults here. I'm not a clown, and I did not ruin a pair of 1ks with salt. I'd have to be a pretty big idiot to do that. I don't even live in Chicago. I have not even made a single recommendation that could tell you how much or little I know about leather.

 

They were indeed a premium workboot line, made out of shell cordovan. However, how many people are really using it as such? And how useful is a leather-soled workboot?

 

As for the harm done, there is some harm done. It completely changes the look of the leather, and generally flattens the depth of colour. It darkens shoes significantly. It reduces the amount that boots can patina. It reduces breathability, increasing the temperature of the inside environment and leading to more sweating, and that excess moisture can cause damage. If you're looking for perfect waterproofing, you'll never get it. GYW construction isn't perfectly waterproof. For that, I urge you to look at veldtschoen construction. For most people's situations, cxl is already quite water resistant, and you never need much more. For other things, care is very simple. Wax treatments also trap dirt and dust, which can cause damage over the long run.

 

Personally, I am not a fan of treating my boots with things that have the potential to cause negative side effects, especially when the protective benefits of that treatment aren't needed. Nor are they needed by most.

post #5022 of 6652
My clown comment was not directed at you.

Neatfoot oil rots. It doesn't matter how much is used. It's not very resistant to any kind of contamination. It used to be used a lot for horse tack until one to many 20K saddle ended up getting destroyed because of it. Filson boot oil contains the essential oils and waxes that are used in vegetable tanning. That makes it an extremely good choice for conditioning this type of leather.

I addressed why this leather changes color whether or not you do a thing to it. Attempting to discount one of it's known properties is futile is it not? I'm not sure why you keep insisting that new CXL's initial water hydrophobic qualities is enough for most people and nothing else is needed. Again those properties disappear ofter X amount of time no matter what you do to them. The entire reason why you condition and possibly LP your boots is to preserve and protect the leather. Using regular show wax or cream polishes are what block the pores of leather. Beeswax does not do that because of it's ability to stay semi fluid not to mention it's also anti fungal and microbial. Unlike most here I have bothered to look at the patents of some of the beeswax products and why it does what it does and how it works. It doesn't block the pores like you think it does.

I'm also not sure how you could say what I do stops the leather from developing a patina. My proof is my boots. Patina also doesn't develop in a year or two. It takes many years and much use for good looking patina to develop. It'll never happen if the leather doesn't live long enough right? I can tell you factually that if I didn't maintain my boots they wouldn't have lasted the first year of ownership. I learned how to properly maintain good leather by destroying it first by doing nothing or using products that really didn't do what they were supposed to do.
post #5023 of 6652
Please just shut the fuck up

Every 3 pages it's a bitch fest with the same arguments over and over

Admin should delete the first post and someone should write an EDU for strictly fashion usage. Post that up with the cranes method. Put some stupid pros and cons that will be bickered about, and have that be the end of it.
post #5024 of 6652
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crane's View Post


Why would I use a product that contains turpentine as a leather conditioner? Why would I use neatsfoot oil when that product has a tendency to rot when exposed to perspiration or water allowing bacteria and fungi to grow? I already explained why I use Filson boot oil. It was specifically made to condition full grain vegetable tanned leather.
You are becoming quite the troll while showing your complete lack of knowledge on leather and it's care in general. Aren't you the same clown that said they had a pair of 1K boots that got completely destroyed by street salt in Chicago? Why is it that my boots are exposed to that on a regular basis and even nastier environmental hazards and I don't have that problem? Keep right on going with your would you trust this guy who does this shit. The fact of the matter is I have clearly demonstrated just how much these boots can take and with a little cleanup they look just fine.
 

Trolling?

 

It wasn't my 1k boots that got destroyed if you bothered reading my past posts.  Great effort...

 

http://i.imgur.com/M4ieOR9.jpg 
 

Since when do 1k boots have single stitching near the heels?!

 

The fact that my OTHER SNO SEAL'D boots got destroyed by salt should tell you something about weatherproofing.

post #5025 of 6652
Quote:
Originally Posted by themonster View Post

Trolling?

It wasn't my 1k boots that got destroyed if you bothered reading my past posts.  Great effort...

http://i.imgur.com/M4ieOR9.jpg 

 
Since when do 1k boots have single stitching near the heels?!

The fact that my OTHER SNO SEAL'D boots got destroyed by salt should tell you something about weatherproofing.

It's not my problem that you don't know what the fuck you're doing.

As far as you're other question is concerned call Wolverine and ask them. From what I can tell from your past posts you buy seconds and if that's the case here then oh well.
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