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Wolverine 1000 Mile Boot Review - Page 290

post #4336 of 6248
Quote:
Originally Posted by Granschos View Post

I bought a pair of 1000 mile boots in rust color 6 months ago and I really like them. However I got a scratch to one of the boots and I tried to fix by applying some layers of shoe polish to the scratch. I later realized the color of the polish I applied was to dark. Don't ask me why but I later applied the same polish to the whole front part of the boot ending up with two boots of different colors. Yes, I'm with stupid.

Tried to fix it using leather soap and thus perhaps get rid of some of the dark polish. However I was not that succesful. Any suggestions on what to do?


Thanks!


 





keep using leather cleaner I think saphire makes one.. But I will also mention to not use polish on cxl. just brush and use cream.
post #4337 of 6248
Quote:
Originally Posted by Granschos View Post

I bought a pair of 1000 mile boots in rust color 6 months ago and I really like them. However I got a scratch to one of the boots and I tried to fix by applying some layers of shoe polish to the scratch. I later realized the color of the polish I applied was to dark. Don't ask me why but I later applied the same polish to the whole front part of the boot ending up with two boots of different colors. Yes, I'm with stupid.

Tried to fix it using leather soap and thus perhaps get rid of some of the dark polish. However I was not that succesful. Any suggestions on what to do?


Thanks!
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
 





Looks like a job for Saphir Renomat. That's saphir's super awesome leather cleaner, it's specifically designed to get rid of extra polishes and waxes. Saphir Renovateur will do it to a small extent, but it's more of a conditioner/cleaner, maybe not strong enough to remove an entire bad layer of polish. As above said, colored wax/polishes/pastes are a no-go for CXL.
post #4338 of 6248
Quote:
Originally Posted by fathergll View Post

Some pics after treatment. I applied two light coats of Obenauf's Leather Oil over a few days and then applied the Obenauf Heavy Duty LP via the Crane method.


Honestly from what i've seen you need to be very careful with applying both the Leather Oil and LP at least on the tan. You should go very light on the application at first to see how it behaves also to avoid inconsistent darker spots. This is the styleforum after-all and I doubt people are spending this much money on boots strictly for utility so you probably want them looking good from the get go. Another poster warned me about this and I can confirm what he wrote below though I managed to avoid them thanks to him.

Yeah it's styleforum and people are spending a good chunk of change on these boots. There's also a group think mentality that will shorten the lifespan of these boots too. Just because they are expensive does not mean that you can forgo proper maintenance. I have explained the properties of this leather and what you can expect over time for years now. You can deny it until hell freezes over but it is what it is. I've spent a good chunk of my life in an urban environment. The crap that you step into in the city can be far more damaging than what you'll find in a working pasture. If you wipe a light coat of oil on leather and certain spots get darker that tells me that those spots are dry. Why? It's penetrated into the leather instead of standing on the surface. It's no different than getting them wet with water. The darker spots are where the water soaked deep into the leather. Again, that's a sure sign you're dealing with dry leather that needs some kind of conditioning. Tan colored leathers is the choice of color for some of us because over time it dramatically darkens up and develops a gorgeous patina. Oh and looking good from the get go means jack. That's simple. Having them look good 10 years from now is where it's at. Good luck with that if you spend all your time worrying about nonsense and things that are unavoidable.
post #4339 of 6248
^Amen brother!^
post #4340 of 6248
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crane's View Post

If you wipe a light coat of oil on leather and certain spots get darker that tells me that those spots are dry. Why? It's penetrated into the leather instead of standing on the surface. It's no different than getting them wet with water. The darker spots are where the water soaked deep into the leather. Again, that's a sure sign you're dealing with dry leather that needs some kind of conditioning. Tan colored leathers is the choice of color for some of us because over time it dramatically darkens up and develops a gorgeous patina. Oh and looking good from the get go means jack. That's simple. Having them look good 10 years from now is where it's at. Good luck with that if you spend all your time worrying about nonsense and things that are unavoidable.


You're missreading what I said. I didn't apply a light coat and had darker spots show up. The dark spots showed up only when more product was applied to a specfic spot more than another(by accident). In my opinion and by rockcrawler's opinion it is much easier to get uneven spots when going heavy on the application.

I'm just offering my opinion from my experience with the boots. I'm not advocating applying one light coat and go compete in tough mudder.
post #4341 of 6248
Quote:
Originally Posted by fathergll View Post

You're missreading what I said. I didn't apply a light coat and had darker spots show up. The dark spots showed up only when more product was applied to a specfic spot more than another(by accident). In my opinion and by rockcrawler's opinion it is much easier to get uneven spots when going heavy on the application.

I'm just offering my opinion from my experience with the boots. I'm not advocating applying one light coat and go compete in tough mudder.

You didn't say you went over a spot twice inadvertently in what you originally said. Uneven spots are to be expected and there's nothing you're going to do about it. Do you have any idea how I apply oil to any of my leather? I take a rag and soak it with oil and then wipe whatever it is down. After a minute or two I take a clean dry rag and wipe the excess off and I'm done.

Tough mudder? LOL! The shit you walk through in Chicago a few days after a wet snow is far worse than plain old mud.
post #4342 of 6248
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crane's View Post

Life proofing your boots. I like that. It's got a nice ring to it but it really does describe the madness behind the method. What I really need to do is get some of these products talked about into the store and stocked. Then I can put together the Crane's Ultimate Life Proof Boot Care Kit. LOL! Hell I could even put together rural and urban variants! ROFLMAO!

I was toying with putting together a package on amazon with all this and selling it via affiliate links and driving traffic to my post... Physical storefronts are so 2002
post #4343 of 6248
Quote:
Originally Posted by BostonHedonist View Post

I was toying with putting together a package on amazon with all this and selling it via affiliate links and driving traffic to my post... Physical storefronts are so 2002

Well considering we've been around since 1899 or there abouts I'll keep that in mind. LOL! We haven't found the receipts yet but we're fairly certain we sold these boots back in 1914 when they first came out. Affiliate links and traffic driving? I might know a thing or two about that as well. Good luck with your venture if you decide to give it a go.
post #4344 of 6248
Wolverine messenger/thin briefcase. Regularly 400 bucks now 300. Call the store to order 573254-3311. I have 3 tan and 3 otter.


Wolverine 1000 Mile Messenger Bag and Boot Care Kit by DYSong Photography, on Flickr


Wolverine 1000 Mile Messenger Bag and Boot Care Kit by DYSong Photography, on Flickr


Wolverine 1000 Mile Messenger Bag and Boot Care Kit by DYSong Photography, on Flickr
post #4345 of 6248
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crane's View Post

Well considering we've been around since 1899 or there abouts I'll keep that in mind. LOL! We haven't found the receipts yet but we're fairly certain we sold these boots back in 1914 when they first came out. Affiliate links and traffic driving? I might know a thing or two about that as well. Good luck with your venture if you decide to give it a go.

"Venture" he calls it. ^.^
post #4346 of 6248
Quote:
Originally Posted by BostonHedonist View Post

"Venture" he calls it. ^.^

What else would I call it?
post #4347 of 6248
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crane's View Post

What else would I call it?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crane's View Post

What else would I call it?

Hobby? Side project? Gravy? Everybody likes gravy.
post #4348 of 6248
Here's my Rust pair - bought in March 2010 and worn regularly since then. Sno-sealed every so often and first coat of polish was applied a few days ago (right before pic was taken). No re-sole so far except for having a second topy applied a month or so ago. I love these boots.

post #4349 of 6248

Anyone know of a place I could purchase some Obenauf's or Snoseal in Europe, preferably Germany or, better yet, in store in Berlin [or a place that will ship to Germany from the US and still manage to keep the cost of a tub under $30 usd]? I'm a displaced American and I'd like to hit my 1K's with some really good rain/salt/snow protection before the winter picks up. I've found some places in the UK, but at 18 quid for an 8oz tub + ~20 quid shipping that is a bit rich for my blood.

 

Or alternatively, is there a good Euro replacement for proper treating/conditioning/waterproofing of CXL? I was thinking maybe Saphir dubbin (since Saphir stuff is pretty ubiquitous at local Berliner Cobblers): http://www.avel.com/products,1,41 [specifically the Dubbin HP, Sport HP or Ouraline?], or would any of my fellow Euro SF'er be able to point me in the right direction?

 

 

Vielen dank!

post #4350 of 6248
Quote:
Originally Posted by VirtruviusR View Post

Anyone know of a place I could purchase some Obenauf's or Snoseal in Europe, preferably Germany or, better yet, in store in Berlin [or a place that will ship to Germany from the US and still manage to keep the cost of a tub under $30 usd]? I'm a displaced American and I'd like to hit my 1K's with some really good rain/salt/snow protection before the winter picks up. I've found some places in the UK, but at 18 quid for an 8oz tub + ~20 quid shipping that is a bit rich for my blood.

Or alternatively, is there a good Euro replacement for proper treating/conditioning/waterproofing of CXL? I was thinking maybe Saphir dubbin (since Saphir stuff is pretty ubiquitous at local Berliner Cobblers): http://www.avel.com/products,1,41 [specifically the Dubbin HP, Sport HP or Ouraline?], or would any of my fellow Euro SF'er be able to point me in the right direction?


Vielen dank!
I've found sno-seal to be pretty readily available in mountaineering and outdoor shops, at least in the UK.
I use Doc Martens wonder balm
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