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Wolverine 1000 Mile Boot Review - Page 17

post #241 of 6617
Quote:
Originally Posted by bobm View Post
The answer is a definite NO! These are not made for heavy rain and/or snow. They are excellent well made boots, but there are waaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaay better alternatives for rain and snow.


See my thread here.
http://www.styleforum.net/showthread.php?t=212036

Bob

You are mistaken. You either have a) a defective pair or b) did not waterproof them properly.

I'm wearing my 1000 Miles right now through a nice cold and snowy Canadian winter with no problems. Apply sno-seal liberally and throw a topy on them and you're good.
post #242 of 6617
Quote:
Originally Posted by johnH123 View Post
You are mistaken. You either have a) a defective pair or b) did not waterproof them properly.

I'm wearing my 1000 Miles right now through a nice cold and snowy Canadian winter with no problems. Apply sno-seal liberally and throw a topy on them and you're good.

My guess is they are defective. I own 3 pair and have yet to experience a water problem.

The soles on my original 1Ks are getting pretty thin. I'm going to to have them resoled commando style. I'm going to use a lugged heel plate and a raptor half sole made by Vibram. If it's possible I'm going to have my leather guy storm welt them as well.
post #243 of 6617
Ignore him. Bob was the same poster who cautioned users that using obenauf's would ruin leather shoes, because he used it on non-smooth leather and it darkened
post #244 of 6617
I have a question, and I'm not trying to stir up shit but I'd seriously like to know this from someone seasoned like Crane's, and to all those of you recommending that these shoes are suited for rain/snow, or at least perform well...

Obviously you can snow-seal them and water protect them as well, but no amount of sealant is going to protect a leather sole from becoming saturated with moisture - and that is going to happen, and pretty quickly, in the snow. The result of this is cold feet, no matter how well the upper leather is protected. Call me naive, but I just spent a day in Chicago wearing my snow-sealed Wolverine 1K mile boots with decent smart wool socks, and I wouldn't recommend these over a pair of properly soled winter boots. Anything with a Vibram sole would greatly outperform these any day.

In short, I'd say that while you definitely can wear these in the snow or rain, I wouldn't recommend them as winter shoes for prolonged use unless you plan on getting them properly soled by a cobbler. It believe it will also significantly reduce the life of the sole.

Someone weigh in on this, of course I am open to gaining some knowledge and I wouldn't call myself an expert by any means, but my experience in some serious urban snow in Chicago, and rain in the bay area tells me that these are not a great choice for wet conditions.

Another point - for anyone wondering sizing issues, it is all about the socks with these. It can make a difference of a half to a full size as these are not insulated. If you are going to be wearing them with any kind of significant sock more than a standard thin dress sock (and you should) I wouldn't size down from your Brannock measurements more than a half size. Maybe even stick to your normal size as Crane's said. Most retailors won't suggest that you try them on with wool socks, but I would.
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post #245 of 6617
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crane's View Post
My guess is they are defective. I own 3 pair and have yet to experience a water problem.

The soles on my original 1Ks are getting pretty thin. I'm going to to have them resoled commando style. I'm going to use a lugged heel plate and a raptor half sole made by Vibram. If it's possible I'm going to have my leather guy storm welt them as well.

Sounds like a great idea.
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post #246 of 6617
Quote:
Originally Posted by meso View Post
Ignore him. Bob was the same poster who cautioned users that using obenauf's would ruin leather shoes, because he used it on non-smooth leather and it darkened


Hang on to that violin you're playin', bro. Obenauf absolutely made of mess of my Katahdins - unless you happen to prefer a very muddy black color to them - some people do and that's cool; I sure didn't and was ticked that the package I received from Obenauf made no mention of that fact. They did have it on the web though. I don't think I ever said they would ruin anyone's shoes - just change the color quite a bit on those particular boots though. Actually, if I can, I will try to post a picture of the boots. Again, my complaint was not having that info/warning available for those particualr boots. I bough them brown, I WISHED THEM TO REMAIN BROWN, yes a darker brown, but brown.
I am not knocking Obenauf's or Montana Blend, but as they state on their website their product is not to be used on every type of leather. I tried some Obenauf on a small area of my Colenel Littleton leather bag and turned it muddy browm. Speaking with the Obenauf dealer, he even said that itis not for fine leather bags.

Anyhow, back to the 1000 K boots. Montana pitch blend and Obenauf's were used by me on these boots and I thought I'd be ready for the rain, not standing in streams mind you, but a decent rain storm on concrete and grass, not ankle deep mud. I sure was surprised as well as disappointed that me feet were getting damp almost immediately and soaked within the hour.
The response from CS at Wolverine, was just as I mentioned "they are not intended to be worn in the rain". SAY WHAT! I was as very surprised at this response and told her to get back to me Monday on a resolution. Obviously, others have had a similar experience and other like Karl from Crane's - who is very familiar withe shoes and brand has had great luck using Snoseal to keep them dry.

Hopefully, I will hear from them Monday.

Bob
post #247 of 6617
Quote:
Originally Posted by bobm View Post
Hang on to that violin you're playin', bro. Obenauf absolutely made of mess of my Katahdins - unless you happen to prefer a very muddy black color to them - some people do and that's cool; I sure didn't and was ticked that the package I received from Obenauf made no mention of that fact. They did have it on the web though. I don't think I ever said they would ruin anyone's shoes - just change the color quite a bit on those particular boots though. Actually, if I can, I will try to post a picture of the boots. Again, my complaint was not having that info/warning available for those particualr boots. I bough them brown, I WISHED THEM TO REMAIN BROWN, yes a darker brown, but brown.
I am not knocking Obenauf's or Montana Blend, but as they state on their website their product is not to be used on every type of leather. I tried some Obenauf on a small area of my Colenel Littleton leather bag and turned it muddy browm. Speaking with the Obenauf dealer, he even said that itis not for fine leather bags.

Anyhow, back to the 1000 K boots. Montana pitch blend and Obenauf's were used by me on these boots and I thought I'd be ready for the rain, not standing in streams mind you, but a decent rain storm on concrete and grass, not ankle deep mud. I sure was surprised as well as disappointed that me feet were getting damp almost immediately and soaked within the hour.
The response from CS at Wolverine, was just as I mentioned "they are not intended to be worn in the rain". SAY WHAT! I was as very surprised at this response and told her to get back to me Monday on a resolution. Obviously, others have had a similar experience and other like Karl from Crane's - who is very familiar withe shoes and brand has had great luck using Snoseal to keep them dry.

Hopefully, I will hear from them Monday.

Bob

And that's just rain. Try wearing them in the snow. The leather sole soaks up moisture and leads to cold toes pretty quickly. And you can't seal the sole. Not to mention ice slip.

- I just want to say, I love these boots. they are just not meant for the wet weather - not that you can't make them work pretty well in it, but they are not ideal.
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post #248 of 6617
Quote:
Originally Posted by bobm View Post
Hang on to that violin you're playin', bro. Obenauf absolutely made of mess of my Katahdins - unless you happen to prefer a very muddy black color to them - some people do and that's cool; I sure didn't and was ticked that the package I received from Obenauf made no mention of that fact. They did have it on the web though. I don't think I ever said they would ruin anyone's shoes - just change the color quite a bit on those particular boots though. Actually, if I can, I will try to post a picture of the boots. Again, my complaint was not having that info/warning available for those particualr boots. I bough them brown, I WISHED THEM TO REMAIN BROWN, yes a darker brown, but brown.
I am not knocking Obenauf's or Montana Blend, but as they state on their website their product is not to be used on every type of leather. I tried some Obenauf on a small area of my Colenel Littleton leather bag and turned it muddy browm. Speaking with the Obenauf dealer, he even said that itis not for fine leather bags.

Anyhow, back to the 1000 K boots. Montana pitch blend and Obenauf's were used by me on these boots and I thought I'd be ready for the rain, not standing in streams mind you, but a decent rain storm on concrete and grass, not ankle deep mud. I sure was surprised as well as disappointed that me feet were getting damp almost immediately and soaked within the hour.
The response from CS at Wolverine, was just as I mentioned "they are not intended to be worn in the rain". SAY WHAT! I was as very surprised at this response and told her to get back to me Monday on a resolution. Obviously, others have had a similar experience and other like Karl from Crane's - who is very familiar withe shoes and brand has had great luck using Snoseal to keep them dry.

Hopefully, I will hear from them Monday.

Bob



I dunno what you did but i put a shit load of obenauf's on my ascot's and it didn't change the colour too much (as shown).

Yeah, leather treatments don't stop your leather from absorbing water. When soaked for long enough leather will behave like a sponge just like your fingers do when they get wrinkly in the bath. Even my waterproof leather watch band absorbs water and gets completely soaked. The waterproof part just means it doesn't deteriorate after heavy and lengthy contact with water.

As a waxy sort of compound, obenauf's helps to keep oils in the hide when it is wet and when it finally dries out. Basically, putting it on is a lot better than not putting it on.

Funny that wolverine says they're not designed to be worn in the rain. hmmm. Wonder what Crane's has to say about that *stirs shit* JK JK.
post #249 of 6617
i agree exactly with MSSneaker and bobm. these boots do not work in alot of rain or any snow at all. My freezing wet feet are a testament to that. I ordered some Red Wing GT/Beckmans for those situations.
post #250 of 6617
Quote:
Originally Posted by alexspecs View Post


I dunno what you did but i put a shit load of obenauf's on my ascot's and it didn't change the colour too much (as shown).

Yeah, leather treatments don't stop your leather from absorbing water. When soaked for long enough leather will behave like a sponge just like your fingers do when they get wrinkly in the bath. Even my waterproof leather watch band absorbs water and gets completely soaked. The waterproof part just means it doesn't deteriorate after heavy and lengthy contact with water.

As a waxy sort of compound, obenauf's helps to keep oils in the hide when it is wet and when it finally dries out. Basically, putting it on is a lot better than not putting it on.

Funny that wolverine says they're not designed to be worn in the rain. hmmm. Wonder what Crane's has to say about that *stirs shit* JK JK.

Sorry for sounding like a broken record, but I have said again and again, Obenauf's DRASTICALLY changes the colors of leathers such as used on the Katadhin's; some like that color; I don't. Obnenauf did not provide that warning in the package they sent me, after speaking with the rep, they may now do so.
Ok, I had the same experience as you did with my 1000 K''s using Obenauf's, turns a little darker, certainly not objectional to me at all. Agree with you about no leather treatments not stopping absorption of water - to an extent. I mean if you have constant rain, that's one thing, but Obenauf's states their product to resist "Dynamic and static water penetration".
But a fairly short walk in the rain? Thought there would have been more protection.
Anyhow, we seem to be getting mixed (yet valid) results - some such as Karl from Cranes - who probably is more familiar with the Wolverine line and general leather care than most anyone, has reported far different results and has stated, he thinks my boots have a defect. Others, as we see right here, as well as the CS rep from Wolverine (after keeping me on hold to confer with another person there) says the boots will absorb water from the get-go, don't wear when raining.
Perhaps, just perhaps, Snoseal offers more protection than Obenauf's or Montana Pitch Blend?

I am certainly not knocking the 1000 k boots (which I really like a lot) nor Obenauf's (quality product). I'm just stating my surprise at the vastly different experiences with their ability (after treatment) to abosrb or resist water penetration.

Bob
post #251 of 6617
^^ I just don't know how a boot with a leather sole could be encouraged or recommended as a winter boot. You can Sno-seal or Obenauf the hell out of them, it's still not going to stop the water from absorbing into the sole and, even if not making your feet wet, at the least making them cold. A sock can combat this to a point, but I wouldn't live through a snowy winter in them as some have suggested. It's entirely possible to do so, but not comfortable.
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post #252 of 6617
Got cold feet and hands? Then cover your head.

This old saying is very much true. Long before you realize you're actually cold and showing signs of mild hypothermia your body shifts into survival mode. First the feet go and then the hands. After that the shivering begins. Upwards of 70% of your body heat dissipates through the top of your head. Most of the time the cold feet problem is remedied by wearing a hat versus adding more insulation to the foot/boot. I'm talking more along the lines of casual contact versus all day events in the cold. Long term exposure is another matter completely.

Concerning the soles and water. Oak leather is a very water resistant leather. Unless you expose the sole to water day in and day out the chance of having a water problem directly attributable to the sole is about none. That includes wet snow BTW too. Dry snow will not effect them at all.

The weak point of these boots is the welt. Chromexcel and Shell are notoriously water resistant. In my waterproofing primer I made it clear that time spent on the welt area is the most important aspect of the waterproofing process. I also said if they are leakers from the word go they'll still leak after it's all said and done. Just not as bad. If they just seep a little then the chances are good that once you're done they won't seep anymore. On the obvious side boot oil and Sno Seal also conditions the leather.

Are these a well made boot? Yes. Do they look good? I suppose so for a work boot. Are they good for daily use by most folks no matter what it's like outside? Yes they are and with a little maintenance/care they'll serve you well and last for years. Are they perfect for all activities and conditions? Absolutely not. No boot, no shoe, no "fill in the blank" is. Can I ride a horse wearing these? Yes, but my ropers or other cowboy type boots is a much better choice for that specific activity. Same goes for serious hiking/climbing. I own a pair of custom Limmers for that.

As far as Wolverine's response to the water situation is concerned think litigation and obligations as a manufacturer. That's all it is, nothing more.
post #253 of 6617
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crane's View Post
Got cold feet and hands? Then cover your head.

This old saying is very much true. Long before you realize you're actually cold and showing signs of mild hypothermia your body shifts into survival mode. First the feet go and then the hands. After that the shivering begins. Upwards of 70% of your body heat dissipates through the top of your head. Most of the time the cold feet problem is remedied by wearing a hat versus adding more insulation to the foot/boot. I'm talking more along the lines of casual contact versus all day events in the cold. Long term exposure is another matter completely.

Concerning the soles and water. Oak leather is a very water resistant leather. Unless you expose the sole to water day in and day out the chance of having a water problem directly attributable to the sole is about none. That includes wet snow BTW too. Dry snow will not effect them at all.

The weak point of these boots is the welt. Chromexcel and Shell are notoriously water resistant. In my waterproofing primer I made it clear that time spent on the welt area is the most important aspect of the waterproofing process. I also said if they are leakers from the word go they'll still leak after it's all said and done. Just not as bad. If they just seep a little then the chances are good that once you're done they won't seep anymore. On the obvious side boot oil and Sno Seal also conditions the leather.

Are these a well made boot? Yes. Do they look good? I suppose so for a work boot. Are they good for daily use by most folks no matter what it's like outside? Yes they are and with a little maintenance/care they'll serve you well and last for years. Are they perfect for all activities and conditions? Absolutely not. No boot, no shoe, no "fill in the blank" is. Can I ride a horse wearing these? Yes, but my ropers or other cowboy type boots is a much better choice for that specific activity. Same goes for serious hiking/climbing. I own a pair of custom Limmers for that.

As far as Wolverine's response to the water situation is concerned think litigation and obligations as a manufacturer. That's all it is, nothing more.

Well said (as usual) Karl. Thanks.

Bob
post #254 of 6617
Quote:
Originally Posted by MSSneaker View Post
And that's just rain. Try wearing them in the snow. The leather sole soaks up moisture and leads to cold toes pretty quickly. And you can't seal the sole. Not to mention ice slip. - I just want to say, I love these boots. they are just not meant for the wet weather - not that you can't make them work pretty well in it, but they are not ideal.
Step aside Clarks. Wolverine 1K: the ultimate desert boot.
post #255 of 6617
Soooo is there a consensus emerging that even with sno-seal these boots are NOT suitable for winter? Can anyone else weigh in on their experience?

I'm having trouble pulling the trigger on these vs. GTs just because of the cold weather factor...I'm also in Canada and we have a lot of snow already. That said I'll be rocking a filson double mackinaw cap on my dome to retain body heat so perhaps that will take care of it...
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