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Wolverine 1000 Mile Boot Review - Page 152

post #2266 of 6759
Quote:
Originally Posted by gardenbuffet View Post

Is Bick 4 Leather Conditioner a good substitute for obenauf?

No they are for different applications. Bickmore Bick 4 is equal to AE leather lotion. Not cleaner\condition but straight lotion. It is good for maintaining contrast stitching and not darkening the leather at all. I have gone to Bickmore Bick 4 for some applications. I also use Bickmore Gard-more on my AE suede chukkas, it works great and does not contain silicone. I have worn them a lot this summer and only treated them twice but put them through some pretty rough use. I do use Bick 4 on the bridle leather on my Filson bags besides my AE Wilbert shoes with contrast stitching. BTW Crane's can hook you up with a Filson sportsman bag too if you are not aware. You don't have to use it for what it was intended for but I do.

 

1000

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Crane's View Post

Relying on stretch to get a boot to fit is a huge mistake. They should not be tight. If they are the boot size or width is incorrect. To get it right you wear a medium thickness sock and try on the boots after you've been walking around a bit. Your feet can easily swell an entire size during the day, especially when it's hot outside and you're active. In the winter you'll learn very quickly that you need to wear thicker wool socks if you want warm feet. Insulation only works if it isn't overly compressed. Tight boots means choked blood circulation and if the wool is compressed it kills it's overall effectiveness. It's a balancing act and one you want to get right. My custom Limmer climbing boots were made for my feet and they feel a bit loose in the morning when wearing light socks. They're not so loose after an hour of hiking. When I wear a medium thickness wool sock the fit is as perfect as one can get. They better be because that's the weight sock I went with for the fitting. If I go with a really thick arctic weight wool sock the boots are noticeably tighter but not constrictive. I am a measured 8.5D and it just so happens that's the size 1Ks I wear. I don't believe in luck but I do believe that Wolverine takes feet swelling and sock thickness into account when they determine sizing. I'm sure with over a hundred years of work boot experience behind them they know a thing or two. With all that said I can see going a half size down but a full size down just doesn't sound good at all.

 

Great post and knowledge. I went with Russell Moccasin for my custom boots. I needed height and durability for 8-12 miles a day busting through brush and wet areas like Northern Mn. and the pot hole regions of South Dakota. But also the strength of a load bearing boot like the Limmer to pack boned elk and mulie quarters out of the mountains of Co. They were able to pull it off for me. 

 

On boot care I have a pair of work boots that are 30 years old, the second from the left. Standard government issue made by the lowest bidder....

 

 

1000

 

They spent the first 10 years of life on ships working in engine and boiler rooms plus firefighting. Pretty rough environment and they have been exposed to salt water, oil, hydraulic fluid, jet fuel, diesel fuel marine, fire fighting foam and powder, heat, etc. Kiwi wax and polished regularly has kept them in good shape all this time. For the last part of their life I have only pulled them out to run the chain saw as they have steel toes. So it was a bit hard for me to get used to the idea of a rough looking work boot when I keep most of my boots and shoes in pretty good looking condition.

 

I posted a picture back awhile ago of my Bayfield CXL after I wore them in the woods for a couple of hours. I wanted to see exactly how well they handled it and then cleaned up. I've been treating all my boots with the Russell Moccasin method for quite a few years now.

 

http://russellmoccasin.com/leather_care.html

 

It also works for CXL as I already knew. There is nothing wrong with the Crane's method, nothing at all. I do mine a bit differently and it doesn't mean either method is right or wrong. I use Fiebing’s glycerine saddle soap for cleaning and restoring the leather. It isn't regular saddle soap it is a bar of 100% glycerine. Glycerine is what museums and archaeologist use to restore leather. And that is about it.

 

So after a couple of hours in the woods my CXL looked like this:

 

1000

 

 After I got home I cleaned up several pair of boots, I find it easier to do them in batches as long as I'm doing them. Start with stripping out the laces of course. About $1,500 worth of boots here alone....

 

1000

 

Then in the deep sink use a stiff nylon brush to work up a lather of saddle soap and straight hot water. I scrub them until the lather is clean. Then use a sponge and work up a good lather and let it sit for a couple of minutes then brush it off with a clean sponge. On my AE rough collection shoes which is the same leather as the Krause (Horween Dublin) I only use a sponge and saddle soap, no brush. After cleaning them they need to dry thoroughly. After a couple of years of doing this as the leather cools and dries yellow glycerin will actually come out of the pores of the leather much like white bloom will on shell when they are new. The CXL dries quickly compared to my other leather boots and here I had already applied Saphir Reno to them.

 

 

1000

 

You can see the luster really comes out. And any scars or blemishes are gone too. Many people could stop here but like many on here I find boots that are not waterproof are pretty much like tits on a boar, not very useful. I apply HDLP same as Crane's does the SnoSeal.

 

 

1000

 

Some of the luster is gone after that but they are still pretty decent looking. And functional.

 

So after the experiment with CXL I still go back and forth on the merits of CXL. It really isn't that hard to clean and protect, they dry over night. Those rust colored 1K original boots that illicitstylz posted pictures of are fantastic looking. I have the 744 LTD in cigar shell brown. And just ordered the Krause in russet because these 1K boots are so damn comfortable. When the #8 in CXL come out thinking it will be hard to resist.

post #2267 of 6759
At one time I was considering doing a full sole on a pair but opted against it.
post #2268 of 6759
Remember how you all wanted me to post on how to really clean your boots up before you treat them? Cold Iron just explained how above. Hot water, a cleaner and a brush or sponge is how it's done. I know, some of you are literally saying water and soap on leather? Yep that's how it's done. Dirt in the pores of leather will cut the fibers and eventually destroy it. CI and I may use different products but we literally do the same thing to our boots and that's why they'll be around for decades.
post #2269 of 6759
Quick question(s).

1) Read through every page, seems like cleaning/oil is applied for worn boots, but how about brand new?
Brand new pair (just came in from Cranes), never worn, would you still suggest applying oil FIRST then the LP? (obenauf)


2) How many eyelets up do you guys tie up with your laces? Must come down to preference right?



Oh, and Crane's, I'll be calling today to order another pair of Wolv 1k's 8.5D
post #2270 of 6759
Quote:
Originally Posted by illicitstylz View Post

Quick question(s).
1) Read through every page, seems like cleaning/oil is applied for worn boots, but how about brand new?
Brand new pair (just came in from Cranes), never worn, would you still suggest applying oil FIRST then the LP? (obenauf)
2) How many eyelets up do you guys tie up with your laces? Must come down to preference right?
Oh, and Crane's, I'll be calling today to order another pair of Wolv 1k's 8.5D

Treat them straight out of the box. I always have said this.

Most of the time all the way up though I'll also go partway wrap the laces around and tie them off too. whatever works I guess.

Excellent, what color this time around?
post #2271 of 6759
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crane's View Post

Treat them straight out of the box. I always have said this.
Most of the time all the way up though I'll also go partway wrap the laces around and tie them off too. whatever works I guess.
Excellent, what color this time around?

Shoot, my obenauf LP is in the mail, but that means I'll have to shop locally to find oil (avoid MINK and Petroleum distillates) or wait even longer via online order... sigh. Already itching to wear them, been wearing them around the house a bit already haha.

8.5D in Rust (for a friend of mine, he saw mine and held them in his hands, needless to say more than impressed especially after informing him about Goodyear welts, CXL Horween leather and USA made).

Can you grab a pair and put it aside if possible? I'll be calling in roughly an hour or two to place the order. Guaranteed.
post #2272 of 6759
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cold Iron View Post

No they are for different applications. Bickmore Bick 4 is equal to AE leather lotion. Not cleaner\condition but straight lotion. It is good for maintaining contrast stitching and not darkening the leather at all. I have gone to Bickmore Bick 4 for some applications. I also use Bickmore Gard-more on my AE suede chukkas, it works great and does not contain silicone. I have worn them a lot this summer and only treated them twice but put them through some pretty rough use. I do use Bick 4 on the bridle leather on my Filson bags besides my AE Wilbert shoes with contrast stitching. BTW Crane's can hook you up with a Filson sportsman bag too if you are not aware. You don't have to use it for what it was intended for but I do.

 

 

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

1000

 

 

 

 

Great post and knowledge. I went with Russell Moccasin for my custom boots. I needed height and durability for 8-12 miles a day busting through brush and wet areas like Northern Mn. and the pot hole regions of South Dakota. But also the strength of a load bearing boot like the Limmer to pack boned elk and mulie quarters out of the mountains of Co. They were able to pull it off for me. 

 

On boot care I have a pair of work boots that are 30 years old, the second from the left. Standard government issue made by the lowest bidder....

 

 

 

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

1000

 

 

They spent the first 10 years of life on ships working in engine and boiler rooms plus firefighting. Pretty rough environment and they have been exposed to salt water, oil, hydraulic fluid, jet fuel, diesel fuel marine, fire fighting foam and powder, heat, etc. Kiwi wax and polished regularly has kept them in good shape all this time. For the last part of their life I have only pulled them out to run the chain saw as they have steel toes. So it was a bit hard for me to get used to the idea of a rough looking work boot when I keep most of my boots and shoes in pretty good looking condition.

 

I posted a picture back awhile ago of my Bayfield CXL after I wore them in the woods for a couple of hours. I wanted to see exactly how well they handled it and then cleaned up. I've been treating all my boots with the Russell Moccasin method for quite a few years now.

 

http://russellmoccasin.com/leather_care.html

 

It also works for CXL as I already knew. There is nothing wrong with the Crane's method, nothing at all. I do mine a bit differently and it doesn't mean either method is right or wrong. I use Fiebing’s glycerine saddle soap for cleaning and restoring the leather. It isn't regular saddle soap it is a bar of 100% glycerine. Glycerine is what museums and archaeologist use to restore leather. And that is about it.

 

So after a couple of hours in the woods my CXL looked like this:

 

 

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

1000

 

 

 After I got home I cleaned up several pair of boots, I find it easier to do them in batches as long as I'm doing them. Start with stripping out the laces of course. About $1,500 worth of boots here alone....

 

 

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

1000

 

 

Then in the deep sink use a stiff nylon brush to work up a lather of saddle soap and straight hot water. I scrub them until the lather is clean. Then use a sponge and work up a good lather and let it sit for a couple of minutes then brush it off with a clean sponge. On my AE rough collection shoes which is the same leather as the Krause (Horween Dublin) I only use a sponge and saddle soap, no brush. After cleaning them they need to dry thoroughly. After a couple of years of doing this as the leather cools and dries yellow glycerin will actually come out of the pores of the leather much like white bloom will on shell when they are new. The CXL dries quickly compared to my other leather boots and here I had already applied Saphir Reno to them.

 

 

 

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

1000

 

 

You can see the luster really comes out. And any scars or blemishes are gone too. Many people could stop here but like many on here I find boots that are not waterproof are pretty much like tits on a boar, not very useful. I apply HDLP same as Crane's does the SnoSeal.

 

 

 

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

1000

 

 

Some of the luster is gone after that but they are still pretty decent looking. And functional.

 

So after the experiment with CXL I still go back and forth on the merits of CXL. It really isn't that hard to clean and protect, they dry over night. Those rust colored 1K original boots that illicitstylz posted pictures of are fantastic looking. I have the 744 LTD in cigar shell brown. And just ordered the Krause in russet because these 1K boots are so damn comfortable. When the #8 in CXL come out thinking it will be hard to resist.

Cold Iron I'm looking for some good elk/mule deer hunting boots and have been eyeing the Russell catalog. Any advice? These would be used in washington/oregon, from farmland area to the cascades.

 

Not to derail the thread too much; I'm really liking my brown 1000 miles on week 2. I got them to alternate with Alden 403s. I love the way the 403 looks but they are so damn heavy... they may get replaced with some courtlands :) The toe width is better on the 1000 mile, and the last is not as high volume as trubalanace, which works well for my feet.

post #2273 of 6759
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crane's View Post

Cross posted from my 721LTD review thread.....


Here's how you waterproof boots with snoseal or a similar wax oil product.


Get your unlaced boots, some rags, your snoseal, a brush, and a hair dryer.
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)


CIMG0929 by DYSong Photography, on Flickr


Wipe off any mud or crud with a damp rag, brush them thoroughly and start applying the snoseal with your finger liberally. The first pic shows the nice thick bead being applied to the where the welt and the upper meet. This is the area where time well spent will reward you in dry feet even if you stand ankle deep in water.



CIMG0930 by DYSong Photography, on Flickr


Keep applying it liberally in every nook, cranny, along edges...



CIMG0931 by DYSong Photography, on Flickr



CIMG0932 by DYSong Photography, on Flickr



CIMG0933 by DYSong Photography, on Flickr


Once you have the boot completely covered it's time for the hairdryer. What you basically do is heat up an area of the boot until the wax melts. Keep heating it while keeping the hairdryer moving in small circles. DO NOT just blast a spot! It is possible to cook the leather but you would know way ahead of time from the smoke that you F'ed it up but good. LOL. Anyway once the leather warms up enough the pores will open up and the shiny hot wax will just get sucked into the leather. Move over a bit and keep doing this to the entire boot. The big secret to really waterproofing leather is to get the wax deep into the leather. Heat is the only way this will happen.



CIMG0934 by DYSong Photography, on Flickr



CIMG0936 by DYSong Photography, on Flickr


Boot on the left is done. While the boot is still warm take a rag and wipe it down and polish it a bit.



CIMG0937 by DYSong Photography, on Flickr


Another shot of the snosealed boot (left). You can see the wax on the surface. Don't sweat it, this is normal and it does buff up with a little elbow grease.



CIMG0938 by DYSong Photography, on Flickr


The other boot getting it's very liberal dose of snoseal.....



CIMG0939 by DYSong Photography, on Flickr


Once you are done do it all over again. Yeah, that's right do it again. The wax will penetrate deeper into the leather and the addition of another coat of wax/heat will evenly distribute the treatment throughout the boot's leather. That additional coat along the welt area alone is worth the additional work. Once it's all said and done get ready to brush and buff your ass off. If you feel like it you can add a bit of color to the toe cap, vamp and quarters if you wish. If you do you'll get to be shoe shine guy for a bit longer.



CIMG0940 by DYSong Photography, on Flickr
Just for the fun of it here's some more food for thought.


How many times have you read on this board a horror story about water or salt stains on a brand new pair of boots or shoes? How about that great deal on vintage shell cordovan shoes and after one wear they cracked and self destructed? Same goes for leather jackets. How many times?


Here's a few facts about leather that's not well known or talked about.


You have no idea how old the new leather is that your item is made out of. You have no idea how long or in what environment your new leather item has sat around in. All you know is it's supposed to be new. New DOES NOT mean the original tanning oils or waterproofing is intact. Time and environment determine how long it takes for these critical components to dry out, deteriorate or otherwise be compromised. IF YOU DO NOT WANT NASTY SURPRISES WITH NEW LEATHER GOODS then take the time to condition them with the appropriate product BEFORE you use it. If you are going to expose leather to any type of water then waterproof it appropriately BEFORE you get it wet. This truly is a case of where an ounce of prevention is worth it. I wear leather coats in pouring rain, no issues or problems. I obviously put shoes and boots through the ringer. Again no problems.


There is one thing that should be noted. The color will darken. With light oils not as much and over time it does lighten back up a bit. Snoseal or other wax/oil compounds it's a different story. The leather will darken and tend to stay that way. It's a simple choice in my book. I want my boots, shoes, coats, saddles, wallets and whatever else to last as long as possible. That means I will maintain them properly with no regard to the color shift. The other choice in my book is neglect and well you'll pay for it in the long run and possibly much sooner.


Now the vintage stuff is a different animal. It's most likely going to be dry or worse dry rotted. If it's just dry that can be taken care of. It's a process that takes a lot of time and patience but it's doable. Again you go through the restoration process BEFORE you use it NOT AFTER!! Dry rot on the other hand is something that's not fixable. Good luck determining if a leather item is dry or dry rotted.


I digress.


Anyway there you have it. How I waterproof boots and shoes and why I do what I do.

Bumping this up for future reference
post #2274 of 6759
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crane's View Post

Interesting, it looks like the same stuff as what's in the care kit that comes in the waxed cotton banker's bag. The brush is different but other than that it's the same. I'm going to have to get some of these in too. They should be much cheaper than the 1K luggage version. Now just so everyone knows this kit will work just fine if you don't go out and do the stupid stuff that I do.


Hello, similar to Moridin i just picked up a pair and intended to wear them over the winter in toronto, i got the wolverine shoe care case too (but dont know much about taking care of shoes/boots), would you still recommended using filson oil and sno seal first? 

 

and is this the products your referring to?

 

http://www.filson.com/products/boot-oil.55101.html

 

http://www.atsko.com/shop/catalog/Sno-Seal-Beeswax-Waterproofer-orderby0-p-1-c-267.html

 

Thank you! :)

post #2275 of 6759
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crane's View Post

Interesting, it looks like the same stuff as what's in the care kit that comes in the waxed cotton banker's bag. The brush is different but other than that it's the same. I'm going to have to get some of these in too. They should be much cheaper than the 1K luggage version. Now just so everyone knows this kit will work just fine if you don't go out and do the stupid stuff that I do.


Hello, similar to Moridin i just picked up a pair and intend to wear them over the winter in toronto, i also got the wolverine shoe care case (but dont know much about taking care of shoes/boots), would you still recommended using filson oil and sno seal first? 

 

 

Thank you! :)

post #2276 of 6759
I'm not sure if I have 8.5 Rust sitting on the back shelf. If not it only takes a couple of few days to get them from Wolverine.

On you're hunting boots. Insulated or uninsulated? Goretex? How much walking and in what type of environment specifically?
post #2277 of 6759
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crane's View Post

I'm not sure if I have 8.5 Rust sitting on the back shelf. If not it only takes a couple of few days to get them from Wolverine.
On you're hunting boots. Insulated or uninsulated? Goretex? How much walking and in what type of environment specifically?

Goretex - preferred but not a deal breaker. My feet don't seem to overheat.

We are out sun up sun down during these hunts, hard to estimate mileage as sometimes you do a lot of waiting.

Mule deer area is fairly easy going farmland - flat. Going after elk is mountainous, shale with adobe clay soil (hate that stuff).

I like a taller boot as my ankles seem to need the support.

 

Appreciate any advice you have cranes. This is for next year as the freezer is already full :)

 

Wearing the 1000 mile brown today with apc ns:

 

 

 

700

 

700

post #2278 of 6759

Thanks for the advice Cold Iron! 

post #2279 of 6759
In the store we have Irish Setter's Elk Tracker boots insulated and not insulated. Both have a Goretex liner. It's a really decent boot for the money. Full grain leather, Goodyear welt, aggressive multi terrain lugs, 12 inches high so decent protection from briars and snakes with fangs and it doesn't weigh six tons. It's definitely heavier than an upland boot but as it's name suggests it's geared for Elk country. Oh and it has a scent blocker as well. Rus Moc makes an awesome boot, so does Filson and Browning.

Now just so you know there's a reason why I no longer buy insulated boots or ones with Goretex. With the exception of wool once the insulation gets wet it's useless and it traps water so not only are your feet cold they're wet and cold. Goretex is great as long as you don't sweat a lot or step in water and flood them. Unlike a plain old boot they aren't going to drain so until you take them off guess what you'll be doing? So with this said I just go out with a simple leather uninsulated boot with a good lugged sole and match them up with a good wool sock designed for the temperatures I'll be in. If and it seems like it always happens you have to cross a stream or underestimate how deep the water really is and you flood your boots it's no big deal. You take off your boots and set them so they drain, take off your socks, wring them out (or get your spare pair out of your pack), put them back on and then put your boots back on. Your feet will feel dry, they'll be warm and you'll be no worse for the experience. This is one of the most well known tricks in the hiking world but it seems to be the biggest secret to anyone else.
post #2280 of 6759

So I finally took the plunge and bought a pair of the 1000 Mile based on this thread (I know...I am not the only one).  Trying to get some expert opinion on something that I noticed:  When I place the shoes on a level surface (e.g. a table), with the heels in full contact with the table, there is actually a gap between the bottom (leather sole) and the table.  Put it in another way, if I place the shoes on the table, there is actually a gap between the heel (towards the very end) and the table.  This is as if the heels are angled.  Is this suppose to go away after the shoes are fully broken in, or is this by design?

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