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Best Animated Film - Page 4

post #46 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tokyo Slim View Post
I would rate most of the first list higher than most from the second list. I believe what you are talking about is the homogenization of Disney movies into formulaic crappy musicals featuring saccharine, horrible plots and grandiose Elton John pop songs. Most of the egregious offenders are on the second list.

Maybe you prefer that. I don't.

I'd rather watch The Black Cauldron, The Rescuers, The Great Mouse Detective, The Sword in the Stone, The Aristocats, or Robin Hood than anything on that second list.

+1

Didn't the post-'89 Disney films also signify the advent of wholly computer-animated work? It all began to look far too sleek and stylised for my liking.

As I said in an earlier post, I'd take the scratchy hand-drawn animation of any the earlier films over the later ones (the CGI Pixar stuff is great though).

I'm curious to see if this new Disney film (signifying a return to hand-drawn animation) looks different at more recent stuff.
post #47 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tokyo Slim View Post
I would rate most of the first list higher than most from the second list. I believe what you are talking about is the homogenization of Disney movies into formulaic crappy musicals featuring saccharine, horrible plots and grandiose Elton John pop songs. Most of the egregious offenders are on the second list.

Maybe you prefer that. I don't.

I'd rather watch The Black Cauldron, The Rescuers, The Great Mouse Detective, The Sword in the Stone, The Aristocats, or Robin Hood than anything on that second list.

They all pale when compared to the Golden Age films, but you hit a nerve with Robin Hood as it was a creative low point for the animators who were forced to recycle old animation and characters.

The post '89 work brought the animation department back from the brink, creatively and financially, and besides, I like Elton John.

Quote:
Originally Posted by TheIdler View Post
This. I don't get the love for the post-'89 Disneys, unless they happened to coincide with your childhood. In fact, I'd wonder how many people's lists here correlate with movies that either came out when they were 6-14 or that they watched on DVD/videos at that age.

I wonder what happens with kids today. When these old movies were released they were in the theatres once, then shelved. There was no video, cable, or downloads. Disney would re-release features on a seven year cycle and they became events. There was also little competition.

With everything readily available to kids these days I wonder if anything will be treasured in the same way we love the classic Disney movies.

lefty
post #48 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tokyo Slim View Post
Whats so weird about Japanese raccoon-dogs fighting injustice by using their magic, giant, inflatable, chameleon like nutsacks to disguise themselves as humans, and to fight an army of riot police in an epic battle for all the cookies?

That sounds awesome...or scary as hell, like shit I was always afraid might crawl out from under my bed when I was 9. Either way, I should see!
post #49 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by lefty View Post

I wonder what happens with kids today. When these old movies were released they were in the theatres once, then shelved. There was no video, cable, or downloads. Disney would re-release features on a seven year cycle and they became events. There was also little competition.

With everything readily available to kids these days I wonder if anything will be treasured in the same way we love the classic Disney movies.

lefty

My parents recorded Star Wars when I was a kid, and it's my favorite movie. I don't think there's really much to the idea of mystique-by-absence.
post #50 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by lefty View Post
They all pale when compared to the Golden Age films, but you hit a nerve with Robin Hood as it was a creative low point for the animators who were forced to recycle old animation and characters.

Now lets be fair, they redrew over old frames so they knew they'd have motion that worked instead of coming up with original walking/running/dancing etc. They didn't re-use the same characters. There is plenty of either great story adaptation, imagination, and animation innovation in the movie.

Within the first ten minutes, you see a snake cross it's arms. AND IT WORKS.
post #51 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tokyo Slim View Post
Now lets be fair, they redrew over old frames so they knew they'd have motion that worked instead of coming up with original walking/running/dancing etc. They didn't re-use the same characters. There is plenty of either great story adaptation, imagination, and animation innovation in the movie.

Within the first ten minutes, you see a snake cross it's arms. AND IT WORKS.

You also see that in The Jungle Book.

Sir Hiss and Kaa:


Little John and Baloo:


Not only did they copy characters and action they recycled the same shots within a scene - a cheap TV technique and reflective of the low budget. It pretty much was a fuck you on the part of management to the animators now that the Disneys were dead. Even the voice talent was bizarre. There is no one at Disney proud of this film.

Can we talk about The Man Called Flintstone now?



lefty
post #52 of 123
I don't get what you are complaining about. The similarities between Hiss and Kaa and Lil John and Baloo, and the fact that like twice in the movie, their motions are the same? They are different characters, and there are only so many ways to draw a snake. Hiss's actual movement is nothing like Kaa's. Yes, they drew over some old frames from older movies, but they also created lots of new motion. The voice acting was bizzare how? I think the songs and music in Robin Hood are better than just about any of the modern Disney movies.
post #53 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tokyo Slim View Post
I don't get what you are complaining about. The similarities between Hiss and Kaa and Lil John and Baloo, and the fact that like twice in the movie, their motions are the same? The are different characters, and there are only so many ways to draw a snake. Hiss's actual movement is nothing like Kaa's. Yes, they drew over some old frames from older movies, but they also created lots of new motion. The voice acting was bizzare how? I think the songs and music in Robin Hood are better than just about any of the modern Disney movies.
Moreover, snakes are snakes, and bears are bears. That's just how they look and move.
post #54 of 123
Have most of you just not seen this?

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post #55 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by CunningSmeagol View Post
Have most of you just not seen this?


Strangely enough, up until this thread, I've never even heard of it (that I know of). I'll be checking it out this weekend sometime.
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post #56 of 123
Howls Moving Castle.
Princess Mononoke.
Nausica.
post #57 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by CunningSmeagol View Post
Moreover, snakes are snakes, and bears are bears. That's just how they look and move.
Some of the dancing or facial movement scenes are obvious, but only when you watch Jungle Book/Robin Hood/The Aristocats/101 Dalmations/etc back to back. (And are paying attention) Disney has always cannibalized their own work for motion capture that works, even when Walt was alive. Hand drawn animation is hard, and many times it just isn't cost or time effective to draw something 8 times when you've already drawn that movement for a previous film and can just put the new character over the top. You know how the end product will look because it worked already. The Jungle Book itself has something like 25 re-used motion sequences.
post #58 of 123
I have a younger sister (9) and every now and then I babysit her. If it gets to the point where I think she needs to go to sleep, I will put on Jungle Book. I don't know how it happens BUT Jungle Book is an elephant tranquilizer for kids, I swear, every time I put it on, she is out within 5 minutes. This is my secret, so use it my fellow styleforumers.
post #59 of 123
Grave of the Fireflies is the best IMO, but seriously depressing. Watership Down and Secret of Nimh are good as well. I liked Disney a lot as a kid, but always thought Robin Hood and Jungle Book were crap. Tale Spin however, was awesome.
post #60 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by CunningSmeagol View Post
Have most of you just not seen this?
(Watership Down)

Yes.
Enjoyed it very much.

Actually read the book during my Summer of Mescaline. When the movie came out I was seriously tempted to revisit both.
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