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mytailor.com houston stop - SF made me a bad customer - Page 2

post #16 of 44
I have several Hemrajani shirts. All of them have a custom collar with a custom back height and custom collar point lengths. Also, all of them have a split mitred yoke in the back. Also, Joe himself told me that he uses regular thickness MOP buttons on his shirts and that for $12 extra you can get extra thick MOP buttons. I think the problem is that you got a loser salesman - not that Joe can't make these things for you. What would have been best is if you just had the guy measure you, keep that on file, and then order the shirts through their website where you can request anything you want. I've had Joe do things like three-button cuffs for me, which are not an option on the website, with no problem - all I had to do is explain to him what I wanted. It's too bad that you had a bad experience because I think Hemrajani is an excellent source for getting anything you want out of a shirt with a relatively low price point.
post #17 of 44
i am surprised my all this too as from what i know about HK tailors they will be able to anything for you at a price! but it is not uncommon to for HK indian talior to call each other bother (no blood relation) and even the act as the person in question as they think that you wont reconise them
post #18 of 44
I'm surprised by this as well. I have had a few good shirts made by Hemrajani, and intend to order more. Granted, I have only done the online order thing, but I have made special requests on armhole size and minor details, and there has never been a problem.

Thanks for your passing along your experience. One of their reps is in town next week, and I have an appointment to look at fabric. I am considering trying a suit from them, but I'll gauge the professional ability of their rep before making that decision.
post #19 of 44
I had an appointment with Kenny and had , what I would consider, average experience. There were too many appointments at once, hence the room was crowded and his attention was definitely stretched across at least 3-4 customers at a time. He seemed a bit standoffish when I asked him a very simple question about a particular herringbone fabric that they had, as well as when I had him take one shirt off the order (because he said they had it in a different color, when in fact they did not). I've only been into clothing to the point of trying to learn what a split yoke is (<reminds himself to look it up.. should read Kabbaz's treatise on shirts>) or caring if buttons are MOP or plastic, for about 2-3 months. Even with my very limited knowledgebase, I felt like the experience was nearly as good as I expected it to be, from what I read prior to this posting.

I find that my SAs live and die by customer service. I'm not sure if I would order from MyTailor.com again because of my experience, especially when there are tailors based in my area - granted, I might not pay what I would at MT, but I feel that I'd be better attended to.

I'm glad I'm not the only one that wasn't thrilled. Thanks.
post #20 of 44
You're better off not getting the shirts. If you feel like it I would say email the co. and tell them of your experience. Maybe you can get this guy fired. I had a similar experience at Siam Palace in Bangkok and it got to the point where I told the salesperson that I fit movie stars in America all the time and I knew what I wanted. As a rule I don't bring out the big guns but the whole experience turned into a battle about who's right when imo the customer is ALWAYS right.
post #21 of 44
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by lawyerdad
I'm a bit unclear on the bit about making the sleeves 1/2" too long because your'e not used to shirts with perfect-length sleeves. Was he saying that based upon the shirt you were wearing he thought you were used to longer sleeves and thus would be disappointed if you actually got sleeves the length you were requesting (and thus he would make them 1/2" longer than you were requesting) or what?
Sounds like a disappointing and frustrating experience - bummer.


The shirt that I was wearing happened to have sleeves that were probably 1" too long. I knew that they were too long and told him this. As he was measuring my sleeve length, he told folded up the cuff on the shirt that I was wearing, indicating that would be the length of the sleeves on the shirts he would make for me.

The folded up cuff hit me about halfway between the end of my wrist and the beginning of my thumb - about 1/2" too long. He then told me he would be making them this length, 1/2" too long, because I would feel that sleeves that were the correct length were too short, since I was wearing a shirt that had sleeves that were too long.

In other words, what you said is correct.
post #22 of 44
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by stach
You're better off not getting the shirts. If you feel like it I would say email the co. and tell them of your experience. Maybe you can get this guy fired. I had a similar experience at Siam Palace in Bangkok and it got to the point where I told the salesperson that I fit movie stars in America all the time and I knew what I wanted. As a rule I don't bring out the big guns but the whole experience turned into a battle about who's right when imo the customer is ALWAYS right.

I was thinking of emailing the company, but I am still not sure about it. It is disappointing, because I wanted a tailor to measure me and make me custom shirts! Unfortunately I was not able to get that. If I work with someone who is knowledegable in Joe H., it still will not satisfy me as it will basically be the same experience as I'm used to which is ordering shirts sight unseen based on my measurements.
post #23 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by raley
It is disappointing, because I wanted a tailor to measure me and make me custom shirts! Unfortunately I was not able to get that. If I work with someone who is knowledegable in Joe H., it still will not satisfy me as it will basically be the same experience as I'm used to which is ordering shirts sight unseen based on my measurements.

Raley, I know it's frustrating, but if you can wait until November, Chan will be back in Houston for its November tour. No order minimum. And at around $100 a pop, not much more than you were going to pay mytailor.
post #24 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by stach
As a rule I don't bring out the big guns but the whole experience turned into a battle about who's right when imo the customer is ALWAYS right.

I would say yes and no on this old adage. I have a friend who if left to his own devices would come out of his tailors wearing the most abominable things. Luckily his tailor has the good sense to recognize this and acts as somewhat of a consultant, letting my friend know when his choices would not be "right".

If you have a really good tailor, you go to him not only for the quality of his work, but for his expertise, which is invaluable. Sometimes his expertise may result in a situation where your choices may not be "right"

K
post #25 of 44
i think this is a case of a seller with a short fuse (at that time, at least) and an exacting buyer.
post #26 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vintage Gent
Raley, if you give Hamilton and/or Saigon a try, I'd be interested to hear about your experiences. I've purchased most of my recent shirts through Chan, although it would be nice to have a reasonable local option with a slightly more expansive fabric selection.


I have seen shirts by both Hamilton and Saigon. I will not vouch for fit, only construction and fabrics. Hamilton will have one of the best selections of fabrics in the USA.

At least the shirts are being made locally and you have someone to talk to. Even though English at Saigon might be weak, you can at least talk to Lan at Saigon. she is the woman who runs Saigon with her brother. Her English is decent in that weird Vietnamese English accent.

With the off shore shirmakers, the shirts just show up. What expert is going to evaluate the fit.

Carl

www.cego.com
post #27 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by raley
The shirt that I was wearing happened to have sleeves that were probably 1" too long. I knew that they were too long and told him this. As he was measuring my sleeve length, he told folded up the cuff on the shirt that I was wearing, indicating that would be the length of the sleeves on the shirts he would make for me.

The folded up cuff hit me about halfway between the end of my wrist and the beginning of my thumb - about 1/2" too long. He then told me he would be making them this length, 1/2" too long, because I would feel that sleeves that were the correct length were too short, since I was wearing a shirt that had sleeves that were too long.

Are you sure he wasn't allowing extra length for shrinkage/bending of the arm? Unbuttoned, all properly fitting shirt sleeves extend past the wrist. It sounds like he was making them the proper length, unless I'm misreading your post or you have very long hands.
post #28 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by raley

I picked side pleats and asked for a split yoke. He had no idea with a split yoke was. I tried explaining, and showed him the split yoke on my shirt, but he still was confused. I told him to forget about the split yoke.



I've been buying custom shirts at Barton & Donaldson in Philly. Their position is that the split yoke and pleats are needed for RTW shirts so that they are more "flexible" - but are generally not needed for Bespoke.
post #29 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by rajesh06
I've been buying custom shirts at Barton & Donaldson in Philly. Their position is that the split yoke and pleats are needed for RTW shirts so that they are more "flexible" - but are generally not needed for Bespoke.

A split yoke serves no purpose on RTW shirts, except to look pretty. If you think about it, a split yoke in RTW is essentially the same as a single piece of cloth; it consists of two matching pieces that have been sewn together in the middle.
post #30 of 44
When I was younger, I let tailors talk me into what they liked and what they thought was better, etc. Although I certainly value their input, if they appear ignorant or insistent, I walk . . . simple as that.

Few if any professions are allowed to dictate what the customer gets despite presenting the customer options, I see no reason why a tailor should be any different.
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