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The ubiquitous white shirt!

post #1 of 31
Thread Starter 
I'm about to get a new shirt to replace the one I have which is frankly quite unflattering to wear without a coat. It's tentlike, and the double cuffs don't quite get along with my cufflinks or fold correctly. Also, the fabric wrinkles like a bitch. So... I think I'm going to draw inspiration from James Bond. White, medium spread collar, placket front, split yoke, and turnback cuffs (I don't really want to have to buy a lot of cufflinks). The fabric won't be Sea Island, but a high grade wrinkle-resistant broadcloth. Shirt will be by Baron Boutique. Anyone think this is a particularly bad idea? I'm not necessarily trying to be like Bond, but I do really like the style of his shirts back in the early films. The turnback cuffs look especially tasteful even today. As far as colour, there's a brighter white and a softer one. Which would you go with?
post #2 of 31
Personally, I think the turnback cuffs look gimmicky. But that is neither here nor there. However, I would caution you that I don't think there really is any such think as "wrinkle resistant broadcloth" unless there are some synthetic fibers blended in, and I'm not sure you really want that ...
post #3 of 31
Thread Starter 
Sure doesn't feel synthetic. I will ask them, however. I've bought a wrinkle resistant/non-iron shirt before that is 100% cotton.
post #4 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jovan
Sure doesn't feel synthetic. I will ask them, however. I've bought a wrinkle resistant/non-iron shirt before that is 100% cotton.
Is it treated with something?
post #5 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jovan
Sure doesn't feel synthetic. I will ask them, however. I've bought a wrinkle resistant/non-iron shirt before that is 100% cotton.

Had to be chemically treated.

EDIT: Manton beat me to it.
post #6 of 31
Thread Starter 
I don't see how that's necessarily bad though. It's still 100% cotton and feels great. Should I get a canvassed collar? I think I've grown a bit attracted to them.
post #7 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jovan
Sure doesn't feel synthetic. I will ask them, however. I've bought a wrinkle resistant/non-iron shirt before that is 100% cotton.

Don't you find you still need to iron it?
post #8 of 31
Thread Starter 
No... that would kind of defeat the purpose, and I've never been able to get any of my normal shirts completely, perfectly crisp anyways. (I don't use starch)
post #9 of 31
Chemical coatings on shirts creep me out. I still won't buy Brooks' non-irons.
post #10 of 31
never iron your non-irons, it starts a chemical reaction triggering a nuclear explosion what do you think happened in chernobyl?
post #11 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by dare-
never iron your non-irons, it starts a chemical reaction triggering a nuclear explosion what do you think happened in chernobyl?
Seriously, I'd just get a non-iron shirt. I think the ones that are teflon-coated, or whatever they are, just don't feel right. And if you do iron them, I think the coating could react very badly to the heat.
post #12 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by DocHolliday
Chemical coatings on shirts creep me out. I still won't buy Brooks' non-irons.

I bought a few Brooks non-irons a while ago. I regret that purchase. I wore them a few times and now, after wearing nice shirts for a while, I realize how crappy the feel and material of those shirts really is. They are 100% cotton, but they're just not the same as my CEGO, Hemrajani, or Chan shirts. Even my Tyrwhitt shirts feel better than the Brooks non-irons.
post #13 of 31
Thread Starter 
Mmmkay, I see the hate for non-iron is rampant. I can assure you the stuff I got feels just fine though, and I'll even get them to mail you a swatch if you don't wanna believe me. Now, can we get back on topic?
post #14 of 31
There are two ways to make a non iron shirt.
The first which is produced by a huge manufaturer call TAL. they produce one of every eight shirts sold in the USA.

Theiratented process takes a finsihed shirt, Tapes the seams and then dips the shirt in the wrinkle free solution. It sounds rather toxic to me.

Other shirt companies buy a pre treated fabric. There is a great deal of ammonia in the process.

These are produced in 100% cotton. The finest yarns are not used due to the fact that the solutions leaves the fabric feeling sort of like plastic.

Jovan, what you mean by a canvassed collar is the collar lining is not fused, or glued. Fused or un fused collars start with the same woven interling. The Fusables just have a layer of glue on one side which is melted and bonded to the fabric by heat and pressure.

If you are going for wrinkle free then I would suggest you stay with a fused collar.


Carl


www.cego.com
post #15 of 31
Everyman Should Have A White Ocbd. If You Don't Have One I Highly Recommend This For Your Next Shirt.
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