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Can something be too perfect? - Page 2

post #16 of 36
Thread Starter 
I think this is a danger that we run into on this forum sometimes. People get too concerned about showing exactly 1/4" of cuff, and having your shirt exactly 1/8" above your suit collar, and having your tie in a perfect half-windsor knot, with a perfect dimple and having your jantzen shirt's shoulder ending perfectly on your shoulder bone and having the cuff opening exactly perfectly right, and having the perfect amount of waist suppression, and having your trousers break just perfectly where they are supposed to and your shoes perfectly polished, etc. that you sort of start to look "too perfect." That's why I like that quote about putting care into buying your clothes and putting them on and then forgetting about them for the rest of the day. That's really a gem.
post #17 of 36
This Spatula Style Sounds A Lot Like Trad. I Like It.
post #18 of 36
I know how that is. I sometimes find myself fidgeting a bit, and I need to tell myself to stop. I mean, most of the time I'm wearing a tie knot that's renowned for its imperfection (four in hand), so it doesn't make much sense. I also sometimes mess with my pant cuffs if they're not sitting juuust right over my shoe. Once again, BAD!
post #19 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by Full Canvas
Sprezzatura always sounds so very much like the concept of Shibumi. The understated elegance and effortless perfection of a subtle kind are expressed in both.
_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

From most first year Psychology texts discussing the four levels of competence-
"The one who achieves Unconscious Competence is:
The individual has had so much practice with a skill that it becomes 'second nature' and can be performed easily (often without concentrating too deeply)."

__________________________________

Sort of Satori Sartori!

Or, rather, mushin no mushin - but with clothing

"I first hit enlightenment when I realised that my glen plaid suit could be matched with my small checked shirt without consciously about it."
post #20 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jovan
I know how that is. I sometimes find myself fidgeting a bit, and I need to tell myself to stop. I mean, most of the time I'm wearing a tie knot that's renowned for its imperfection (four in hand), so it doesn't make much sense. I also sometimes mess with my pant cuffs if they're not sitting juuust right over my shoe. Once again, BAD!

Guilty on all accounts.
post #21 of 36
I've found that most stylish men generally have 2 things in common.

1) They are extremely confident in their appearance, whether that confidence was hard earned or came by naturally.

2) They wear a uniform, that which that suits them best, whether it's a white shirt and jeans, or a suit. It makes dressing well effortless.

Marc Jacobs's concession to black tie, for example, is to wear a black v-neck sweater over a white shirt instead of wearing his usual tee shirt. He would probably feel, and therefore, look, uncomfortable in a dinner jacket. So he doesn't wear one. That is self-awareness.
post #22 of 36
My favorite dresser:

post #23 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by LabelKing
My favorite dresser:


I find him interesting to look at, but I think that he was too conspicuously and self-consciously on display to be considered stylish.
post #24 of 36
Seems to me what you are talking about is comfortable self confidence.



Cuff
post #25 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by LA Guy
I find him interesting to look at, but I think that he was too conspicuously and self-consciously on display to be considered stylish.
What I find compelling was his unorthodox usage of color, which was very adept, and not some slap-dash attempt at being flamboyant. Not even Pat Field can quite replicate his gaudy classicism. The combination of the double-cuffed shirt and the djebella is not something anyone can make work.
post #26 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by LabelKing
What I find compelling was his unorthodox usage of color, which was very adept, and not some slap-dash attempt at being flamboyant.

Not even Pat Field can quite replicate his gaudy classicism.

my vote goes for Andre Leon Talley.
post #27 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by edmorel
my vote goes for Andre Leon Talley.
Andre Leon Talley is too conventional-looking most of the time, and some of his ensembles are rather regrettable, I feel. His mentor, Diana Vreeland, on the other hand was quite chic. Dali's style was singularly mad without looking like a mental-case escaped. It had a foundation of classical elements. One can also make a case for Hamish Bowles who tends to dress in a very British fashion although he was known for running around in Chanel suits.
post #28 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by LabelKing
Andre Leon Talley is too conventional-looking most of the time, I feel. His mentor, Diana Vreeland, on the other hand was quite chic.

I guess it depends on your convention. I've seen him in the streets of NYC with a full dark fur lined cape and walking stick. He also wears red dress shoes. Yes, he does wear and appreciate conventional suits ( I think he is a fan an customer of Anderson and Sheppard) more often than not, but I find those that are always on the edge, lose that edge.
post #29 of 36
"Oh, never mind the fashion. When one has a style of one's own, it is always twenty times better." Margaret Oliphant


Cuff
post #30 of 36
The only person to match Dali's montage of coloration is Anna Piaggi:
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