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Black shirt: trying too hard? - Page 5

post #61 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by Countertenor View Post
We'll just leave that to your imagination.

I know that amongst professional musicians there is this attitude that anything goes as longs as its black, but I would appreciate any insights as to how such a conclusion was reached. Traditional concert dress was black because it is a formal colour - the colour of a dress coat for an evening concert or a morning coat for a matinee concert. So why are black t-shirts, jeans and sneakers - and worst of all black lounge suits - now considered acceptable?
post #62 of 87
That's all I have to say. But I do like that linen shirt J posted up. I guess it's not too bad for casual shirts. All I have to say is that I own only one black shirt (a long sleeve polo)...that says something. Maybe it's just me but they don't catch my eye.
post #63 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sator View Post
There seems to be this culture now amongst musicians that anything goes as long as it is black: blacks shirts worn open, black t-shirts, black lounge suits. Soloist too - countertenors amongst them - show up wearing black street wear.

I had a concert last week where the preferred dress was black suit with black t-shirt. Seriously. I felt dirty.

Anyway, what you describe is what I like to call "New Music Black". To me, that dress code is well-paired with avant-garde music, but it has recently extended well beyond that category. It's easy and it's cheap, and for most working classical musicians, it has become increasingly important to be frugal.
post #64 of 87
hmm... I was thinking something like this might be a decent look for nights out, in the summer anyways, I wouldn't dream of matching a jacket with this...

post #65 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bandwagonesque View Post
Black just doesn't look good on somebody with my complexion - pale skin, medium brown hair.
Which is why black can look good on Asians. Darker complexion than the average Caucasian and black hair.
post #66 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by Countertenor View Post
Anyway, what you describe is what I like to call "New Music Black". To me, that dress code is well-paired with avant-garde music
Personally, I think that if a dinner jacket - or a dress coat - with a white shirt was good enough for Anton Webern (aka St Anton), it is good enough for anyone playing contemporary repertoire.
post #67 of 87
I have four: prada (velcro front!), Tyrrwhitt linen, versace jeans type, and one cheapie Hong Kong branc (U2) short sleeve. I think I've worn them less than five times in total I once thought the prada looked good with a dark brown windowpane Canali suit.
post #68 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sator View Post
Personally, I think that if a dinner jacket - or a dress coat - with a white shirt was good enough for Anton Webern (aka St Anton), it is good enough for anyone playing contemporary repertoire.
While I share your feelings regarding the degradation of style in classical music-making, I do feel it necessary to point out that Webern was composing music one hundred years ago...
post #69 of 87
I've always loved black. Especially with brown. Black was often favored by Dior; he said it displayed flaws and perfection with unequaled severity.
post #70 of 87
I spent my art school days in black clothing.
post #71 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sator View Post
I know that amongst professional musicians there is this attitude that anything goes as longs as its black, but I would appreciate any insights as to how such a conclusion was reached. Traditional concert dress was black because it is a formal colour - the colour of a dress coat for an evening concert or a morning coat for a matinee concert. So why are black t-shirts, jeans and sneakers - and worst of all black lounge suits - now considered acceptable?
I'm not sure exactly how to put this, but at times I sense disdain for semi-formal wear amongst the classical music community. People wear it only when they absolutely have to. For example, I have a percussionist friend who is getting married this summer. It's an evening wedding, yet he refuses to even consider a dinner jacket, because he says it makes him feel like he's at a gig. Few people in hear will want to hear this, but there is a certain fuss involved with semi-formal wear that younger classical musicians don't want to deal with. Studs, cummerbunds, braces... they'd much rather just throw on a black button down, especially if they're going to a gig right after some other rehearsal across town. Perhaps most important, though, is the fact that classical music audiences aren't getting younger (at least in this country). There is a conscious effort to try to find ways to make classical music more accessible to a wider audience, and part of that effort (misguided as it may seem in a place like this) is to de-formalize the concert experience in general, which includes the way the musicians are presented.
post #72 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by Countertenor View Post
While I share your feelings regarding the degradation of style in classical music-making, I do feel it necessary to point out that Webern was composing music one hundred years ago...

Absolutely and unquestionably true but for many people he is still the avant garde enfant terrible who refuses to die. You sometimes find recordings of his music in the "contemporary music" section of stores. Rarely do I hear contemporary music which sounds anywhere near as 'contemporary' I must admit.
post #73 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by Countertenor View Post

Perhaps most important, though, is the fact that classical music audiences aren't getting younger (at least in this country). There is a conscious effort to try to find ways to make classical music more accessible to a wider audience, and part of that effort (misguided as it may seem in a place like this) is to de-formalize the concert experience in general, which includes the way the musicians are presented.

It goes hand in hand with this business of playing orchestral arrangements of pop music to "win over" the musically uneducated masses. Nor do orchestral musicians commonly look as though they are properly dress educated. I recently saw one or two members of the Vienna Phil on stage in dress coat and CUMMERBUND ! Last Sydney Symph. concert I attended saw the conductor wearing a dress coat in broad daylight without a waistcoat. Most of the players wore turndown collars with pleated fronts with their tail coats. The worst one was a conductor directing a performance of the St Matthew Passion during Easter wearing a dress coat with what looked like an animal print silk waistcoat which showed a good 10 inches below the tail coat.
post #74 of 87
How about as a waiter? I wear black tweed slacks, solid black projekt4 sneakers, along with the stupid restauraunt polo shirt. But Ive considered getting a black button-up, and perhaps a thin black tie. I know theres not much room for experimenting since its basically an all black uniform. Would that look okay?
post #75 of 87
I wear a black shirt with a grey pinstripe suit once in a while, with the right tie it looks great. Gets a lot of compliments from the ladies.
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