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Sartorial mythbusting - Page 35

post #511 of 1680
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post
I wish to understand the signifcance of this. Are you above explaining jokes?

I believe this is a reference to the 1973 James Bond film ""Live and Let Die" in which Kanaga/Mr. Big played by Yaphet Kotto is literally blown up by compressed air. He inflates and rises in the air until he pops like a balloon. The pic is a screen shot of Kanaga being inflated.

Maybe there's some similarity with FNB's pic...
post #512 of 1680
Quote:
Originally Posted by teddieriley View Post
Well, the suit must fit well if I can't tell whether FNB is overly portly or has excessively trained doing 5x5 workouts of benching, deadlifting and squatting.

My guess is that the only lifting FNB has done is with a fork or spoon.

post #513 of 1680
My mother had a poodle named Doxe............
post #514 of 1680
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tomasso View Post
My mother had a poodle named Doxe............


Er, I hope that means I'm in good company...
post #515 of 1680
Quote:
Originally Posted by Doxe View Post
My guess is that the only lifting FNB has done is with a fork or spoon.


Does lifting one's arm to wag one's finger in righteous indignation count as lifting? It appears the hours FNB spends in front of his computer reading clothing forums frequented by posters that he professes to loathe could have been better spent on the treadmill.
post #516 of 1680
For a start: I don't hate drape and I don't hate A&S! I find it very disturbing that their supporters, one of them especially, always come up with such a strongly negative attitude.
It's just that when you brag so much about what you do better than others it actually should be better and not the opposite!
What so many people are not aware of is the fact that some styles are not really meant for every type of figure (voxsartoria is in the right shape and has the best cutter for it, BTW), and drape has it's limitations once the cutter has to adapt the pattern to a portly figure or one with wider hips. Same is valid for those with very sloping shoulders who demand a natural shoulder from their tailors (valid for all styles): It will give you a "sad" appearance and the tailor should advise you against it. John Hitchcock himself has some hefty shoulder padding in his coats.



or to make it more clear:



About whnay's coat: The front is not right and it should be easy to spot with a patterned cloth. The problem is that once it is finished and it looks like this it is hard to correct without cutting a new front (which is a lot of work) and it is not the task of the customer to point out such issues to the tailor/ cutter.

In this short video you can see how the stripes and the fronts should hang:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oipz-8anbxY

Also take a look at the waistcoat of the tailor: It is very tight with even showing the traces of his underwear in the back, which links to the picture of FNB at his "first" fitting.

From my, admittedly, limited experiences so far the camera will add some sort of fullness in areas where it may not be in real life, so if a garment is tight in a picture it will be really tight in real life!

For those who want to know more about figures and grain lines and such:

http://www.thelondonlounge.net/forum...php?f=4&t=9376
post #517 of 1680
I have been told a number of times by various "experts" -- mostly online but sometimes IRL -- that my body type "requires" a built-up shoulderline and a structured coat.

But the thing is, I don't like that and I never have. Those who constantly tell me that I "need" it never take that into account. I am just expected to spend thousands on clothing I don't like and won't wear.

No thanks.
post #518 of 1680
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post
I have been told a number of times by various "experts" -- mostly online but sometimes IRL -- that my body type "requires" a built-up shoulderline and a structured coat. But the thing is, I don't like that and I never have. Those who constantly tell me that I "need" it never take that into account. I am just expected to spend thousands on clothing I don't like and won't wear. No thanks.
I've gotten this same thing here and in retail shops. E.g., went to BB for their sale, tried on a 36R in the regent. The trouser was cut awfully small in the waist and seat (smaller than RLBL, surprisingly). As a man of narrow waist an ample ass, I found the trousers didn't fit, and the tailor there cautioned that there was not enough fabric to accommodate my posterior. Both she and the SA recommended I try on a 38. The shoulders extended past my shoulder and made my head look like a pin, not to mention the several inches of excess fabric thtroughout the chest and body. The SA said it looked fantastic. apparently also thinks I should build up the shoulders. But frankly, I don't mind being a beanpole and would prefer looking too slim to invoking 80s Armani.
post #519 of 1680
As far as I know A&S do very soft pads nowadays.
But if you take a look at the shoulder line of the much praised Fred Astaire in his coat it is obvious that there is a lot of structure in his coat. If there wasn't the shoulders would just sag.

They even did it for Prince Charles (although he got ready made, stiffer pads).
You all can still wear drape, since that is what you want and like, even when your body is "disproportionate" (I know this sounds terrible, but it's a tailors term. A "normal" body has measurements within a certain range, if the measurements are outside of it the body becomes "disproportionate")!
It's just that there should be some tweaks allowed without compromising what you like about your coats.
One of those tweaks would be to cut a side body to adapt the pattern to a certain physique, if needed, rather then sticking to the "house style", no matter what.

Rubinacci extends the front dart down to the hem to get a closer fit around the hips, others cut a side body for the same effect. A very useful option with a side body is to add additional width when needed around the hips while the chest area stays the way it is. It will even create a nicer, snug fitting armhole, which adds more to comfort than a canvas cut on the bias.
Which, obviously was a known fact at A&S back in the 80's.
post #520 of 1680
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post
I have been told a number of times by various "experts" -- mostly online but sometimes IRL -- that my body type "requires" a built-up shoulderline and a structured coat.

But the thing is, I don't like that and I never have. Those who constantly tell me that I "need" it never take that into account. I am just expected to spend thousands on clothing I don't like and won't wear.

No thanks.

Why can't you succumb to group-think like everyone else?
post #521 of 1680
Quote:
Originally Posted by Despos View Post
Why can't you succumb to group-think like everyone else?

I thought the reason everyone wore drape was because they were succumbing to groupthink around me?
post #522 of 1680
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post
I have been told a number of times by various "experts" -- mostly online but sometimes IRL -- that my body type "requires" a built-up shoulderline and a structured coat.

But the thing is, I don't like that and I never have. Those who constantly tell me that I "need" it never take that into account. I am just expected to spend thousands on clothing I don't like and won't wear.

No thanks.

Question. Have you ever owned a 'structured' coat?
post #523 of 1680
Quote:
Originally Posted by George View Post
Question. Have you ever owned a 'structured' coat?

Nothing quite in the Huntsman vein, but I have a few that are quite a lot more built up than I prefer nowadays (and for many years past).
post #524 of 1680
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post
The first-or-not-first-fitting argument isn't really material. The point is that the suit has already reached a high level of finish: the collar is attached, the lapels are finished, and the pockets are cut. If I were a new client, I'd be a little disconcerted.
But is already establish that this person is not new client of this tailor! If is old client with much suit made already then there can to be necessary less fittings!
post #525 of 1680
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post
But the thing is, I don't like that and I never have. Those who constantly tell me that I "need" it never take that into account.

Those that "need" it are at a point in life where their skeleton is so calcified that no amount of conscious muscle tone correction could help in the long run.

In addition to a good three-view mirror, this is what you [and others pad haters] need.

That, or some regular Yoga/Pilates.

- M
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