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Sartorial mythbusting - Page 112

post #1666 of 1680
Quote:
Originally Posted by George View Post
Also, have you ever tried to scratch with a CD player?

That's what everyone is doing nowadays. That and Final Scratch.
post #1667 of 1680
Quote:
Originally Posted by binge View Post
That's what everyone is doing nowadays. That and Final Scratch.
Bloody technology eh...!!! Is nothing sacred...
post #1668 of 1680
Early comparison of Roman (structured) and Neapolitan (soft, drapey) tailoring (in English):



Same thing in German (better version):

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post #1669 of 1680
Quote:
Originally Posted by jefferyd View Post

I do agree that it seems way fast. However, it is a drape coat which is inherently much easier- it is easier to fit a mitten than a glove.



That is too excellent, I'm going to remember that one:

"Wonderful sir, your coat fits like a mitten"
post #1670 of 1680
Quote:
Originally Posted by jefferyd View Post
This coat dates to 1987 and has a sidebody, but the front dart stops at the pocket. It's just a little one.
BTW, are we still trying to figure out if Colin Harvey cut this coat? During my semiannual fitting with Tom Mahon today, sidebodies came up, and he said that Harvey liked to cut with sidebodies because he could get a very shaped coat with a narrow waist and flared skirt --- he apparently liked a more dramatic (flamboyant was the implication) shape than Hallbery, who did not like sidebodies. The traditional A&S cut doesn't have sidebodies, and the skirt goes straight down. If you have a curvy figure (like when they make for women), then they use sidebodies, otherwise not. FWIW. --Andre edit: Vox will be glad to know, too, that we discussed kimchee as well as sidebodies. Apparently Tom's young apprentice (he looks like a kid!) had his first taste of Korean food on this trip, his first to America.
post #1671 of 1680
Quote:
Originally Posted by A Y View Post
edit: Vox will be glad to know, too, that we discussed kimchee as well as sidebodies. Apparently Tom's young apprentice (he looks like a kid!) had his first taste of Korean food on this trip, his first to America.

Tell Tom to keep Ethan away from Despos. Even the faintest hint of garlic and chilies will cause Chris to abduct him.

BTW, Paul is my new tailor .


- B
post #1672 of 1680
Quote:
Originally Posted by voxsartoria View Post
BTW, Paul is my new tailor .

Hopefully doesn't mean Paul only sews for Edwin now. I would be .

--Andre
post #1673 of 1680
Was kimchee involved here? (From Steed's View, Edwin DeBoise's blog.) --Andre
post #1674 of 1680
interesting....I am more than a little surprised about the lapels.

http://tuttofattoamano.blogspot.com/
post #1675 of 1680
Quote:
Originally Posted by S. Able View Post
interesting....I am more than a little surprised about the lapels.

http://tuttofattoamano.blogspot.com/

Click the photograph below of the machine-padded lapel of a 1998 Caraceni from jefferyd's early version article on dismembering a jacket from the iconic maker:



I'll include a link to the truth's Kiton Kut-up thread as well for those who like to compare.

Enjoy.


- B
post #1676 of 1680
Quote:
Originally Posted by Despos View Post
I would like to contribute to this thread.


I had never even heard of these people. Thank you.
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post #1677 of 1680
^^^

Did I ever reply to your PM?
post #1678 of 1680
^If you did, I didn't get it. But don't worry about it. Sometimes I respond to emails or phone calls in my head and forget to in real life.
post #1679 of 1680
There is no doubt that if this coat had proper drape in it it would look better.
So, only thin people can wear drape. Another myth busted.



I was told, about 50 years ago, better drape isn't right next to the scye.
When drape was popular there were tailors in nearly every town, not to mention the big cities. They each had their own opinions about drape. Today we only hear or read about .0000001% about what drape is. I'd like to hear the other opinions, but I can't raise people from the dead to learn more.
Country tailors were know for making loose coats for outdoor work. The Swedes were know for making another type of loose coat. Neither of these two were know as or considered as drape. What other kinds of loose coats are there? From my memories of years gone by what some are calling drape is hardly drape at all. What I saw as a boy is basically the end of the many varitations of drape. The few today is rather simply and not much to look at. Some that was in the past was rather zaney.
There were standards for clothes, which is like rtw, everybody looks the same wearing it. Who wants to be a robot? In the old days some customers competed wtih other customers bringing their ideas to the tailors. Customer and tailor work out the details and then the customer goes and show his friends, each trying to out do the others. Even manufactures were hard at work with new ideas. Todays world where people in their 20s to 30s are discovering tailoring and know nothing of its past seem so timid about stepping away from the herd, it is like looking at stale bread- not very tasty. Strangely, so many "tailoring houses" today are like manufactures with their "house style"- are they really tailors or just better manufactures? House styles are fine, but if they can't depart it how can they be real tailors. Even cheap manufactureing companies change "house Style" every so many months. How is it that those who are supposed to be best don't know how to do something different? Or, refuse? Perhaps another myth is that some of these manufactures are tailors.
post #1680 of 1680
Thanks.
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