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Sartorial mythbusting - Page 99

post #1471 of 1680
I think he said that one reason was that for heavy cloth such as overcoating or thick tweed, the cloth had so much body that the lapel would maintain a good roll even with a machined canvas, whereas for lighter cloth, you need the hand-stitching to build in the shape.

There were some other reasons, but I don't remember them.
post #1472 of 1680
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post
FWIW, I visited the Poole workrooms in the basement of 11 SR in 2007 and I saw the pad-stitching machine, but also a lot of tailors doing it by hand. I asked Angus Cundy why they did both, and he said that coatmakers did one or the other for various garments, depending on certain factors (which I did not really understand).

Perhaps Pooles uses the pad-stitching machine for clients whom they don't like as much as others.


- B
post #1473 of 1680
Quote:
Originally Posted by voxsartoria View Post
Perhaps Pooles uses the pad-stitching machine for clients whom they don't like as much as others.


- B

This last one had machine padding, a pre-fab shoulder pad and a synthetic chest piece. Somebody must have been rather unpleasant......
post #1474 of 1680
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post
I think he said that one reason was that for heavy cloth such as overcoating or thick tweed, the cloth had so much body that the lapel would maintain a good roll even with a machined canvas, whereas for lighter cloth, you need the hand-stitching to build in the shape.

There were some other reasons, but I don't remember them.

Neither of jefferyd's samples seem to be overcoating or a thick tweed, but both have machine padded lapels and collar.


- B
post #1475 of 1680
Quote:
Originally Posted by jefferyd View Post
This last one had machine padding, a pre-fab shoulder pad and a synthetic chest piece. Somebody must have been rather unpleasant......

A miner from the Outback, maybe?




- B
post #1476 of 1680
Quote:
Originally Posted by voxsartoria View Post
Neither of jefferyd's samples seem to be overcoating or a thick tweed, but both have machine padded lapels and collar.


- B

Both are what I would consider thick enough to merit the use of the machine. But then, I used to think 10 z was a heavyweight.
post #1477 of 1680
Quote:
Originally Posted by jefferyd View Post
Both are what I would consider thick enough to merit the use of the machine. But then, I used to think 10 z was a heavyweight.

By "merit," do you mean that handpadding would offer no observable advantage of effect?

If so, does Kiton just have more sophisticated machines for padding the lighter fabrics that they use?


- B
post #1478 of 1680
Quote:
Originally Posted by jefferyd View Post
Allow me the honour.
Stay away from my closet, not just because of whom you might find in there.
Quote:
Originally Posted by voxsartoria View Post
Perhaps Pooles uses the pad-stitching machine for clients whom they don't like as much as others.

I once gave my cutter a piece of Holland & Sherry Target apologizing for any fur left from when the RJ cat had slept on it. He seemed amused at the time.
post #1479 of 1680
Quote:
Originally Posted by voxsartoria View Post
By "merit," do you mean that handpadding would offer no observable advantage of effect? - B
Yes. When the weight and hand of the canvas is fairly evenly matched to the cloth, there is a distinct advantage to hand padding. When the cloth outweighs or overpowers the canvas, the benefits are negligible at best. Examples of hand-padded versus machine-padded in similar (lightish) weights. Hand Machine
post #1480 of 1680
Quote:
Originally Posted by NotoriousMarquis View Post
I feel like that would actually make a lot of sense because a bespoke handmade suit isn't something you need to stretch or move based on the width of your shoulders because it's your size, whereas an off the rack, machine sewn suit is something that people of a roughly similar size but with slight differences here and there would have to wear, so the stretch is necessary to accommodate many people's varying, albeit similar, bodies. No?

Might the notorious Marquis de Custine, who I greatly admire, be the inspiration for your avatar?

http://thecia.com.au/reviews/r/image...ian-ark-3.jpg- film portrayal

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marquis_de_Custine
post #1481 of 1680
I'll try again.

The Marquis de Custine:

http://thecia.com.au/reviews/r/images/russian-ark-3.jpg
post #1482 of 1680
I have an old tailoring manual where they say that you don't have to pad stitch the lapels when using heavy cloth.
But back in the days "heavy" meant a weight beyond even Sator's wildest dreams.

Jeffery, the cloth in your pad stitching video was relatively heavy (around 400gr.) for modern standards and you did wider stitches. Does that mean you'd do more rows of closer stitches if the cloth had like 8 oz. or less?

There is a difference between a regular blindstitch machine and a special pad stitch machine. Both do the same stitch, but the latter has a narrow horn, which allows the tailor to bend the lapel into shape. If the machine is well set it gives quite a nice result. But I agree, using it on very light weight fabrics might be difficult.
I had a picture somewhere of a coat in progress by Des Merrion, where he made just about 20 stitches on the lapel. Heavy cloth, light weight canvas (I think it was a 200gr. camel hair), but nice roll.
post #1483 of 1680
lol nevermind..
post #1484 of 1680
jefferyd has updated his blog with a disassembly of a 2006 Welsh & Jeffries.


- B
post #1485 of 1680
i have seen some that are almost similsr ebecaus fashit macines brought endsieg toi ti.ds. ahhh. ohhh. bahhhhhs. hans expl,oedsedsdes editr: molzart was a faschon with strings quintess too
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