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Dinner suit elegance: Fred Astaire being hanged by the neck, from LIFE Magazine - Page 2

post #16 of 28
It's so symbolic. I particularly like the pocket flaps on the the hangman's tuxedo. The single stud on Astaire's shirt font is doubtless a warning of some kind.
post #17 of 28
Hmmm, they should have gotten the coils on the noose right- traditionally there are 13 of them. Even though he's a light fella, I don't think 4 coils looks right. Should be at least 6 or 8. It throws the whole effect off for me. -said by one who's father, a great fan of all things early western America, taught him how to tie a hangman's noose at the age of 5.
post #18 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wrenkin View Post
I like the single link cuffs and the single shirt stud, though he thereby puts his flapped pocketed friend to shame.

But he does have a nice pair of opera pumps with bows.
post #19 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by ferguscan View Post
Am I the only one who thinks his coat looks rubbish?

Quote:
Originally Posted by voxsartoria View Post
Yes.


- B

+1

Quote:
Originally Posted by ferguscan View Post
Plus, watch chains across the waistcoat are day-wear AFAIK.

No.
post #20 of 28
It appears to me that a lot of the jackets worn around this time and before have unstructured/unpadded/uncavassed (ie. less rigid) lapels. Is this actually the case? What influenced the movement towards more rigid looking lapels?
post #21 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark from Plano View Post
I don't think its a buttonhole, it goes off the edge of the lapel. I've seen other celebrities wearing something similar that I was told was an award from the French government. Is that what this is?

Looks it. Probably represents a medal the way military ribbons do.
post #22 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by dv3 View Post
It appears to me that a lot of the jackets worn around this time and before have unstructured/unpadded/uncavassed (ie. less rigid) lapels. Is this actually the case? What influenced the movement towards more rigid looking lapels?

I'm not sure that is true. Maybe for bespoke. I own a Paul Stuart tux from 1965
which doesn't seem different from contemporary Ivy-League derived dinner clothes.
post #23 of 28
Any chance one can find a RTW waistcoat like that?

Thanks for posting!
post #24 of 28
IIRC Astaire never recieved the Legion d'Honneur, so no idea why the lapel is threaded... Anyway - single-fold cuffs, 3 cuff buttons, satin lapels(!), flap pockets(!!), non-covered buttons(!!!)... reads like a laundry list of yellow and red-flags for SF-approved formalwear. Yet inexplicably these guys are rocking it. Goes to show the gulf between SF pedagogy and real life awesomeness. They also make a strong case for single shirt stud showing as well.
post #25 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
Any chance one can find a RTW waistcoat like that?

Thanks for posting!

Ede and Ravenscroft is your best bet.
post #26 of 28
He was a fine looking man, it is a shame that no one really dresses this way anymore.
post #27 of 28
Pity about the dodgy syrup. Same for Sinatra in his latter day black tie period.
post #28 of 28
For fucks sake he's wearing a suit from the costume department.

Nice toupee though.
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