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Slimming trouser legs

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 
You're probably not going to believe this, but I just picked up a pair of pants from Express (on sale, but at the store). They are a very lightweight, soft charcoal wool/mohair blend and will fit me very well after I take in the waist and seat just a bit (these run really large). I think they will be very useful for summer.

The legs are a bit wide for my liking. I would like to slim them down by about 1-1.5". My question is, for those who have had this done, did the tailor do it from the inseam, outseam or both? I did this (inseam modification) to a pair of BR cotton pants a while back, and I was pretty happy with the results, but those didn't have front creases, and these do. I was thinking it might be easier to do it from both the inseam and outseam than to try and get the original creases out and put new ones in.

So, inseam, outseam or both?

Thanks.
post #2 of 13
I've slimmed pants in the inseam and the crotch area only, and came out pretty good especially if it has lining. I was told, proper way to do this will be inseam and outseam. If the pants have lining to the knees, I would just do the inseam because, doing the outseam with lining is not cost effective or stitching over the lining is not good idea. It doen't take more than an inch to make the pants slimmer unless its a baggy fit pants. then its not a good candidate for slimming in the first place.
post #3 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by j

So, inseam, outseam or both?


Both.
post #4 of 13
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tomasso
Both.
Excellent, thank you both. I am still deciding whether I trust myself to try doing it myself, or if I want to take them somewhere.
post #5 of 13
j, be careful in this venture not to taper the cuffs so much that you're not covering enough of your shoes. I have the opposite problem with several pairs of RLPL trousers I bought on eBay--fabulous wool, nice details, but cuffs that are just too narrow (about 8.4" or 16.8" all the way around). They constantly get hung up in the laces and monk straps of my shoes and really only cover about 50 - 60% of the shoes, not the 2/3 - 3/4 that you want.
post #6 of 13
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Roger
j, be careful in this venture not to taper the cuffs so much that you're not covering enough of your shoes. I have the opposite problem with several pairs of RLPL trousers I bought on eBay--fabulous wool, nice details, but cuffs that are just too narrow (about 8.4" or 16.8" all the way around). They constantly get hung up in the laces and monk straps of my shoes and really only cover about 50 - 60% of the shoes, not the 2/3 - 3/4 that you want.
Thanks, yeah, that's a consideration for sure. These are about 9.25" at the bottom, which is quite large, even for a size 11. I like to show a little more shoe, but not the whole thing either. I was planning to go to about 8.75" at the bottom and reinforce the hem somehow to give it more weight and structure and help it fall better on the shoe. The bottom of my Polo/Corneliani pants falls very well on shoes or chelsea boots, and that was what I was going to model them after.
post #7 of 13
Sacrilege! You should have gotten the jacket as well.
post #8 of 13
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jovan
Sacrilege! You should have gotten the jacket as well.
For $171 for a fused jacket with mediocre construction, I'll pass. The pants were a borderline deal.
post #9 of 13
j, if you'e going to do it yourself, just do the inseams. Much easier.
post #10 of 13
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by stach
j, if you'e going to do it yourself, just do the inseams. Much easier.
Actually, since the alteration would only be from mid-thigh down, I think the inseam and outseam are pretty much the same. However, it is definitely less work to only do the inseam, that you are right about. I may find some junk garment to practice on and have a go at it. This fabric proved pretty easy to work with when I did the waistband.
post #11 of 13
An Express near here was blowing out complete suits for $75 not long ago. If they had been about $25-$35 less, I'd have tried to flip them on eBay.
post #12 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by j
Excellent, thank you both. I am still deciding whether I trust myself to try doing it myself, or if I want to take them somewhere.

I'm learing how to do this myself. If you're comfortable with the sewing machine, its easy job. The hem will be more difficult because you might not have the blind stiching machine, and might need to hand sew the hem... I might post pictures of my project soon doing exactly what you're doing.
post #13 of 13
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by hughjoen
I'm learing how to do this myself. If you're comfortable with the sewing machine, its easy job. The hem will be more difficult because you might not have the blind stiching machine, and might need to hand sew the hem... I might post pictures of my project soon doing exactly what you're doing.
I do my hems by hand. Not my favorite thing in the world, but it's not hard. Just takes a little while. It usually takes me longer to decide where I want them than to actually do them.

I would appreciate the pics.
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