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Watches losing popularity - Page 2

post #16 of 119
Quote:
Originally Posted by countdemoney
Speedmasters are great. A truly historic timepiece. I think the only other sportwatch that intrigues me as much would be the rolex sub or the truly extreme sea dweller.
Not as extreme as this: Breitling Colt Superocean Professional, it can go up to 5000 ft, that’s 1000 ft MORE than the Sea-Dweller: Jon.
post #17 of 119
Honestly the only diver I kind of like is the Planet Ocean... and I never do any diving. I think most Omega/Breitling and Rolexes are extremely boring, ubiquitous looking watches, especially Breitling. I've always prefered dress watches and more cleaner dials, but I realize that in the summer and in a lot of more casual situations that just isn't very practical.

I wish there was an alternative to SS bracelets in the summer... I love wearing gator.
post #18 of 119
Quote:
Originally Posted by Violinist
Honestly the only diver I kind of like is the Planet Ocean... and I never do any diving. I think most Omega/Breitling and Rolexes are extremely boring, ubiquitous looking watches, especially Breitling. I've always prefered dress watches and more cleaner dials, but I realize that in the summer and in a lot of more casual situations that just isn't very practical.

I wish there was an alternative to SS bracelets in the summer... I love wearing gator.

Dress vs. functional watches is apples vs. oranges. My Breitling's are 10 times better as "˜beater' watches than anything from Patek et al. A Breitling isn't a good watch for formalwear and a Patek isn't a good watch to go deep-sea diving with. Each has its purpose.

Jon.
post #19 of 119
Quote:
Originally Posted by countdemoney
Perhaps a brief and incomplete exposure to Heidegger has destroyed my mind.

Watches ding.

Dingpolitik.
post #20 of 119
For driving, it's a driver's watch:
post #21 of 119
Quote:
Originally Posted by imageWIS
Dress vs. functional watches is apples vs. oranges. My Breitling’s are 10 times better as ‘beater’ watches than anything from Patek et al. A Breitling isn’t a good watch for formalwear and a Patek isn’t a good watch to go deep-sea diving with. Each has its purpose.

Jon.

Yeah but there are cool in betweens... for example, a Panerei is for more versatile (on the right man) than a Breitling, so is a Cartier Roadster for example. Unless you run with the crowd on this forum, you could get away with wearing either of those with a suit.
post #22 of 119
Quote:
Originally Posted by countdemoney
Actually, the math on watches is very compelling and is certainly better than many pieces of menswear. That said, you can pick up the previously mentioned speedmaster for about $3k at full retail (more like $2k from an authorized dealer). But even at full retail that's less then $10/day in its first year. A $3,500 bespoke suit that you wear once a week comes out to about $68/use in its first year. The low end of high end ties is about $150 and wearing that every other month puts it at $25/use. In addition to being more expensive than the watch, clothes are far more fragile. Ties are also more often victims of changing tastes.

So, I can understand that you don't get the watch thing, but I don't accept your assertion on the price/value ratio. But to each their own. Perhaps a brief and incomplete exposure to Heidegger has destroyed my mind.

Interesting....I have been trying to justify buying a Patek for quite some time, but I am not quite there yet.

For the past 6 years, I have lived in relative safety in Tokyo. How do security, fungability, and risk of loss play into the analysis? Do muggers still say, "Your bespoke shoes or your life?" I wouldn't hesitate to put my Carlo Franco tie, Huntsman bespoke suit, and Tony Gaziano shoes into the locker at the YMCA. Should I think twice before I put my Patek in it?

Bic
post #23 of 119
Quote:
Originally Posted by Violinist
Yeah but there are cool in betweens... for example, a Panerei is for more versatile (on the right man) than a Breitling, so is a Cartier Roadster for example. Unless you run with the crowd on this forum, you could get away with wearing either of those with a suit.

Of course there are, but I was talking only about Breitling vs. Patek. I can pull off any of my watches in almost any situation.

Jon.
post #24 of 119
How much jewellery can a man wear?

Generally speaking, one would have cufflinks, one or two rings (if one is his wedding ring) and a watch. I feel naked without my watch I have to say.

Incidentally, don't 'they also say' a woman looks at three things when looking at a male - his shoes, haircut and watch.
post #25 of 119
In classic tradition, a man would have a wedding band, a signet ring, and a ring with a beautiful stone.

Of course, with unmarried men, there could be certain liberties taken with rings as period photos attest. Victorian men's flamboyance were in their watch chains and fobs.
post #26 of 119
Quote:
Originally Posted by Violinist
Honestly the only diver I kind of like is the Planet Ocean... and I never do any diving. I think most Omega/Breitling and Rolexes are extremely boring, ubiquitous looking watches, especially Breitling. I've always prefered dress watches and more cleaner dials, but I realize that in the summer and in a lot of more casual situations that just isn't very practical.

I wish there was an alternative to SS bracelets in the summer... I love wearing gator.

Titanium, silicon, rubber, kevlar. I have trouble dealing with rubber though; a strap I had was woven kevlar which worked VERY well for me. But I also have a Bund strap which is "tropic" style - has a thin layer of rubber underneath. I really don't like its feel even if the pad is really well made and the straps themselves are rubber-less...
post #27 of 119
I purchased a nice watch for my (much younger) brother as a graduation present from high school. He wears it but not at all times. He seems equally comfortable checking his phone for the time and has it with him at all times. I consider it to be an inelegant solution, but do enjoy seeing him wear his nice watch when he chooses to do so and am glad he has a tasteful (dressy but somewhat sporty) option available when the mood suits him.
post #28 of 119
I'm almost 30 and haven't ever really worn watches. I find them uncomfortable and hard to shop for since I have small wrists. The only one I had that actually worked on me was a very thin Skagen. I misplaced it though, probably taking it off somewhere because it was uncomfortable and forgetting to pick it back up.
post #29 of 119
Just for the record, at the recent NYC Styleforum dinner the tally on watches was as follows:

Six members in attendance + one spouse:
1) IWC Portofino S/S
2) Glashutte Original lunar
3) Zeno (IIRC) day/date automatic
4) Vintage dress watch of unknown provenance
5) Vintage alumninum pilot watch

So... out of the six members in attedance, five were wearing automatics.
post #30 of 119
My favorite watch of all time is the TAG Heuer Monaco. Second on my list is the Movado Museum. I like the Monaco because Steve McQueen wore it. Refined, I know.
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