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US customer's worst conduct - Page 2

post #16 of 59
Asking for ketchup to go along with a nice grilled pork tenderloin or filet mignon, or some other savory delicacy.
post #17 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by VersaceMan
Asking for ketchup to go along with a nice grilled pork tenderloin or filet mignon, or some other savory delicacy.

what about the people that bring their own bottle of ranch/hot sauce with them hahaha. classy!
post #18 of 59
Thread Starter 
Or asking for a Miller Lite in a four-star restaurant?
post #19 of 59
The only one I really disagree with is the one about staying long after you've finished your meal. As far as I'm concerned, if I pay for a meal I can stay for as long as I like. A lot of restaurants do some pretty shady shit to get customers out of there as fast as possible, especially turning the air conditioner on really high so that it gets really cold in there (which, btw, gives a customer a right to complain about the air conditioning), and I'm sure that it hurts your bottom line by having people linger, but that's your problem. I mean, the restaurant is there to serve its customers, not to serve its wait staff.

I also don't get what people's problem is with ordering ketchup with a steak. If I want ketchup then I'll have ketchup, what business of the waiter's, or anyone else, is it if I eat my steak with ketchup? I'm the one that's eating it and paying for it, so why should I eat it how somebody else likes it, when I can eat it how I like it?

As for tips, I've only stiffed a waiter on tip once. Basically, I was in a restaurant that was not really crowded. My waiter had maybe two or three tables tops. So everything is going well until we finish our meal. When our meal is finished the guy just disappears. I asked about three other waiters if they can get him so he can give us our check and he is nowhere to be found. After waiting for well over a half an hour after our meal was finished I'd had enough and I actually went into the back room only to find the guy back there chit-chatting with some friend of his. I said to him "We've been waiting over half an hour for our check, you mind giving it to us." So he just comes over to our table and gives us the check as if nothing had happened. Only time in my life that I'v ever left a waiter zero tip.
post #20 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrDaniels
One good turn deserves another, so in the name of equal time (from a former waiter):
That's what you get for introducing yourself by name
post #21 of 59
I noticed this 'waiting endlessly for the check' phenomenon started to happen about twenty years ago. I don't get it. One would think that the waiter, having done all the work, would be anxious to move on to the reward portion (tip) and possibly get more customers. Sometimes I linger in a restaurant but it's pretty rare. Better to move on to the club, bedroom etc.
post #22 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by globetrotter

Asking questions about the food or wine that you already know the answers to, just to show off to your trampy date.

again, I don't do this, but what skin is it off your back if a guy can use you to look better to his date were I to do this, I would tip you well for your cooperation.


I still remember the best tip ever received 22 years ago when I waited tables at an upscale (some table-side cooking) during grad school. Mother's Day dinner and know-it-all overbearing obnoxious 20-something monster daughter was taking mumsy and her sister out for dinner. It was clear she was paying for the meal. While attending to the adjacent table, I overheard her lecturing them about wine and the proper wine glasses for red wine. When I brought the wine she ordered, she made a show of tasting it and asked a question she knew the answer to. I then made a comment about the glasses and paraphrased a point of her earlier lecture. Monster daughter was delighted! In 30 seconds I'd garnered a 30% tip.
post #23 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by mano
I still remember the best tip ever received 22 years ago when I waited tables at an upscale (some table-side cooking) during grad school. Mother's Day dinner and know-it-all overbearing obnoxious 20-something monster daughter was taking mumsy and her sister out for dinner. It was clear she was paying for the meal. While attending to the adjacent table, I overheard her lecturing them about wine and the proper wine glasses for red wine. When I brought the wine she ordered, she made a show of tasting it and asked a question she knew the answer to. I then made a comment about the glasses and paraphrased a point of her earlier lecture. Monster daughter was delighted! In 30 seconds I'd garnered a 30% tip.

LOL. That's awesome. Waiting Tables for Fun and Profit, by Niccolò Machiavelli.

@ Globe: while I generally agree with most of the points on the list in the original post, and especially with the one about asking for a special meal at a large banquet with a fixed menu, I believe that your case is the exception that proves the rule. But you were a stand-up guy, tipped well, and were in particularly trying circumstances. The only other times I've seen or heard about this being done are usually with people who are basically spoiled and entitled, and who don't think it's out of the ordinary at all. And thus don't take it into account with tip, and do it when there are perfectly good menu options, even if they aren't particularly exciting.

Actually, come to think of it, I believe the only times I've seen this done have been at weddings (usually at rehearsal dinners) and conferences. I do think it's defensible if someone has very particular dietary needs, though, either because of food allergies, religious convictions, or what have you. I believe that the attempt to avoid four or five courses of brussels sprouts is at least as honorable as a religious conviction. [Perhaps more so, as I believe it to be founded on eminently rational principles, like the axiomatic first principle of dining, "brussels sprouts are fucking horrible". Game-theoretical justification available on request. ]
post #24 of 59
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by odoreater
The only one I really disagree with is the one about staying long after you've finished your meal. As far as I'm concerned, if I pay for a meal I can stay for as long as I like. A lot of restaurants do some pretty shady shit to get customers out of there as fast as possible, especially turning the air conditioner on really high so that it gets really cold in there (which, btw, gives a customer a right to complain about the air conditioning), and I'm sure that it hurts your bottom line by having people linger, but that's your problem. I mean, the restaurant is there to serve its customers, not to serve its wait staff.


I am not talking about lingering for a bit as you finish up your coffee, I am talking about hanging out well over an hour as the entire restaurant empties out. It's not just about the waiter, usually the busboy and dishwasher has to wait and then the night cleaning staff that needs to do a complete cleaning cannot get their job started. Paying all of these people's salaries for an unnecessary extra hour costs more that your meal likely cost.

To follow your logic, that means that a person could stay in a men's clothing store for an hour past the posted closing time because a tie was purchased, or you could stay seated in a movie theatre for an hour after the film is done as well.
post #25 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrDaniels
Or asking for a Miller Lite in a four-star restaurant?

Silly.
How can it be a 4-star restaurant without it, the Miller Lite?
post #26 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrDaniels
I am not talking about lingering for a bit as you finish up your coffee, I am talking about hanging out well over an hour as the entire restaurant empties out. It's not just about the waiter, usually the busboy and dishwasher has to wait and then the night cleaning staff that needs to do a complete cleaning cannot get their job started. Paying all of these people's salaries for an unnecessary extra hour costs more that your meal likely cost.

To follow your logic, that means that a person could stay in a men's clothing store for an hour past the posted closing time because a tie was purchased, or you could stay seated in a movie theatre for an hour after the film is done as well.

Yeah, I agree here. A little bit of time is one thing, but at some point, as a customer, I would just feel *rude* hanging around, forcing everyone to twiddle their thumbs and go home late because I can't be bothered to go find a bar or cafe instead.
post #27 of 59
As the proprietor of a fine dining establishment, I can (regretfully) say I have seen (or heard from my staff) many of the complaints in the original post.

Sad, but true.

My pet peeve? When a customer comes in wearing the AmJack wardrobe of untucked, diagonal stripe shirt, with open collar and french cuffs and square toed shoes. Hey buddy, you're getting the worst table in the house.
post #28 of 59
I'm curious, other than tastefullness, where does the AmJack look rank among diners' attire? Like it or not, it's a step up from cutoffs and a tshirt.
post #29 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Saucemaster
LOL. That's awesome. Waiting Tables for Fun and Profit, by Niccolò Machiavelli.

@ Globe: while I generally agree with most of the points on the list in the original post, and especially with the one about asking for a special meal at a large banquet with a fixed menu, I believe that your case is the exception that proves the rule. But you were a stand-up guy, tipped well, and were in particularly trying circumstances. The only other times I've seen or heard about this being done are usually with people who are basically spoiled and entitled, and who don't think it's out of the ordinary at all. And thus don't take it into account with tip, and do it when there are perfectly good menu options, even if they aren't particularly exciting.

Actually, come to think of it, I believe the only times I've seen this done have been at weddings (usually at rehearsal dinners) and conferences. I do think it's defensible if someone has very particular dietary needs, though, either because of food allergies, religious convictions, or what have you. I believe that the attempt to avoid four or five courses of brussels sprouts is at least as honorable as a religious conviction. [Perhaps more so, as I believe it to be founded on eminently rational principles, like the axiomatic first principle of dining, "brussels sprouts are fucking horrible". Game-theoretical justification available on request. ]


in general, I agree with Mr. Daniels on most of the points, just like I agreed with Mr. Pollack on most of his points - but I was suggesting that there are exceptions to various rules. there are two differences, both coming back to the fact that waiters are getting paid for what they do:

on the one hand, a major part of being a waiter is putting up with people's shit, sorry, but that is life. while I would say to KP that he shouldn't let an asshole ruin his evening, unfortunatly for a waiter it is pretty much a given that they will deal with assholes some time.

the flip side of that is that, if KP runs into an annoying waiter, it makes his meal marginally less enjoyable. an A-hole can create a situation for a waiter that can put his short term livlyhood at risk. all joking aside, I think that only once in my life have I complained about a waitress, and that was due to a truly intolerable situation, and I probrably have given bad tips less than 10 times in my life. I try to treat service people with the most curtesy I possibly can, although I do expect the same from them.
post #30 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by globetrotter
having vegan friends is simply unforgivable.

You hit the nail on the head with this one.
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