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Ok, why can’t Ford make a car like this? - Page 2

post #16 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by LabelKing
How about some Harley Earl?

American designers are becoming more and more banal.


Those nascent tail fins must be from about 1952. That poor Buick toured county fairs and early shopping malls for a few years. It must have been about 1957 that I saw the car displayed at the old Valley Fair in San Jose. It bowled me over and set me on the road to automotive perdition forever!

It didn't take long for the tail fins on Mr. Earl's concept cars to grow into what's pictured in this often published Firebird Trio image.



Those seven tail fins make the one seem more of a Porcupine than a Firebird!

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post #17 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Full Canvas
Those nascent tail fins must be from about 1952. That poor Buick toured county fairs and early shopping malls for a few years. It must have been about 1957 that I saw the car displayed at the old Valley Fair in San Jose. It bowled me over and set me on the road to automotive perdition forever!

It didn't take long for the tail fins on Mr. Earl's concept cars to grow into what's pictured in this often published Firebird Trio image.



Those seven tail fins make the one seem more of a Porcupine than a Firebird!

___________________________________________
There were some rather beautiful concept cars at that time.

I've never been to the old Valley Fair; however, there was an old Town & Country right across the Valley Fair mall now. Of course, it was torn down to make way for one of those high-end shopping arcades what with Gucci, etc.

Palo Alto still has a Town & Country mall.
post #18 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by imageWIS
You're assumptions do not equate. You don't want the car to be expensive, because no one will pay "˜good' money for a Ford (contrary to the fact that the Ford GT sold like hotcakes), yet you want them to include the upwards-opening doors (impractical and expensive), LEDS (expensive and not easy to find replacements; at least at this moment), and the interior (which, with all its metal trim is expensive and really doesn't look all that comfortable).

I see no reason why Ford can't make a car that looks just like this, with the same dimensions as the Ford Fusion, but using normal lights, normal doors, and a normal interior. Utilizing a 4-Cylinder and a V6 as available power plants, plus either RWD or AWD and placing the engine behind the wheels. Seriously, if they make it the right way (a-la Honda or Toyota) I see no reason why a car like that can't be a success.

Jon.

The GT was sold like hotcakes because it was commemorating the original GT40, which was only released to the public for the sole reason of allowing Ford to race in the Le Mans. The GT sold well because it's a collector's item. Although it performs well, who in their right mind would buy a GT for normal driving purposes? (ever seen Jeremy Clarkson complaining about his GT?)

Ford can make a car like this, using "normal" interiors and parts...but then again, this car would indeed be normal. Also, the way it looks right now make the body panels on this car is a repair nightmare, which equates to higher insurance rates. Why do you think the Camry and Accord are so damn plain looking? See, if you dumb down the interior of the car and the exterior of the car, then you have a regular old Ford. Instead of concentrating on making flashy cars, a good start is for Ford to make more reliable and more ergonomic cars. Leave the highend stuff to the highend brands, with highend consumers and highend prices.

When the domestics weren't exposed to Japanese competition, they could pull a fast one over the American consumers by essentially repackaging the same shitty car every year with bigger fins and bolder body panels. Apart from pension issues, this same business thinking during the last 3 decades was what put Ford and GM in their current financial positions.
post #19 of 22
Here's a question -- since some point in the 90's, cars went to being purely virtually modeled, rather than clay. I can tell when I see them, maybe it's the non uniform rational b-spline curves or something. What do you think is the influence of the lack of an artisan's hands on the clay? The lack of pen on paper and the ability to execute curve and angle interfaces precisely (though with standard algorithms)? Maybe cars are more perfect and less personable. My specialty in CAD/CAM/CAE, but I still feel this way. Regards, Huntsman
post #20 of 22
BMW, and I'm sure most, if not all, car companies, still model in clay for the full-scale model. They start with CAD, but it's very important for them to do the full-scale in clay, and look at it from different angles and different lighting, and try out different shapes and designs. Also, you still need to build models for wind tunnel testing. BTW, the Jeremy Clarkson article on his GT is here: http://driving.timesonline.co.uk/art...677058,00.html --Andre
post #21 of 22
The only way that Ford is going to dig themselves out of this shithole is to make the motherfuckers fly.
post #22 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Huntsman
Here's a question -- since some point in the 90's, cars went to being purely virtually modeled, rather than clay. I can tell when I see them, maybe it's the non uniform rational b-spline curves or something. What do you think is the influence of the lack of an artisan's hands on the clay? The lack of pen on paper and the ability to execute curve and angle interfaces precisely (though with standard algorithms)? Maybe cars are more perfect and less personable. My specialty in CAD/CAM/CAE, but I still feel this way. Regards, Huntsman
This reminds me of the Porsche 356 prototype in which the shell was completely hand beaten over a wooden buck. The engine, etc. were made without a machine shop.
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