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What is worse in Europe - Page 7

post #91 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kaga
If my memory serves me correctly, the French have a tendency to treat Asians as if they were all the same. A particularly stinging memory is from one of my Tetsujins' numerous culinary battles with Joel Robuchon, where the latter stated he loved Japanese cooking, especially nem. I think my jury had it in for him that night.

Kaga-san,

What is nem?? I cannot even place its ethnicity.

I would suggest he try shirako. Explain its origin later.

Joel Robuchon has a restaurant in Roppongi Hills. I have never eaten there.
post #92 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fabienne
In my state, I can't buy alcohol on Sundays. The first time I was denied my boeuf bourguignon, I was a bit p....., so I understand you.
WTF? That’s crazy. Jon.
post #93 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by imageWIS
WTF? That's crazy.

Jon.

Same in my state. Part of the (mostly) archaic blue laws. Actually, most alcohol vendors support this law. If it were repealed, all of the package stores would have to be open on Sundays or risk losing business, and the vendors like their day off.
post #94 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by LabelKing
Europeans-unlike Americans-do not have a daily shower habit, which is why bidets are a customary feature in homes and hotels.

Really, I think Americans are the only ones who place a distinct emphasis on daily showers or even two a day.

Is this a joke?
If not, what do you know about the bathing habits of europeans? I can't think of anyone I know who doesn't shower daily.
post #95 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kent Wang
Isn't rohypnol readily available in Europe?

No.
post #96 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by JBZ
Same in my state. Part of the (mostly) archaic blue laws. Actually, most alcohol vendors support this law. If it were repealed, all of the package stores would have to be open on Sundays or risk losing business, and the vendors like their day off.
I find this claim highly dubious.
post #97 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kent Wang
I find this claim highly dubious.

Why, exactly? Within the past couple of years, the "no alcohol on Sundays" law was repealed for one or two specific Sundays. The local paper carried an article quoting many vendors saying that they didn't like it.
post #98 of 173
What do you mean by "package vendor"?
post #99 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kent Wang
What do you mean by "package vendor"?

"Package store" is a regional term which means liquor store. By "package store vendor," I mean the owner of a package store, which sells alcohol at retail.
post #100 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by imageWIS
WTF? That's crazy.

Jon.

I think there are many states with restrictions on Sundays. Yesterday, I got carded while attempting to buy 3 bottles of wine. The guy looks at my card and says: "I'm afraid I can't sell you any alcohol." So I think: Is there some election I can't participate in today? But no, my driver's licence had expired on May 4...
post #101 of 173
I'm sure the matter varies area to area.
Quote:
Originally Posted by JBZ
"Package store" is a regional term which means liquor store. By "package store vendor," I mean the owner of a package store, which sells alcohol at retail.
In Texas, there are a number of gigantic all-alcohol stores such as Spec's and Grapevine Market that feature expansive selections of beer, wine and liquor. But because of the license they have to sell liquor they must close their entire on Sunday, even though their competitors can sell beer and wine on Sundays. I've heard on many occasions from these retailers that they would like to be able to keep their stores open on Sunday. Also, these mega-retailers have enough employees that they don't care really care about taking a break.
post #102 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kent Wang
I'm sure the matter varies area to area.


In Texas, there are a number of gigantic all-alcohol stores such as Spec's and Grapevine Market that feature expansive selections of beer, wine and liquor. But because of the license they have to sell liquor they must close their entire on Sunday, even though their competitors can sell beer and wine on Sundays. I've heard on many occasions from these retailers that they would like to be able to keep their stores open on Sunday. Also, these mega-retailers have enough employees that they don't care really care about taking a break.

I remember seeing drive-thru liquor stores in Texas, god what a brilliant idea: alcohol and moving vehicles, what could go wrong?

Jon.
post #103 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kent Wang
I'm sure the matter varies area to area.


In Texas, there are a number of gigantic all-alcohol stores such as Spec's and Grapevine Market that feature expansive selections of beer, wine and liquor. But because of the license they have to sell liquor they must close their entire on Sunday, even though their competitors can sell beer and wine on Sundays. I've heard on many occasions from these retailers that they would like to be able to keep their stores open on Sunday. Also, these mega-retailers have enough employees that they don't care really care about taking a break.

For the most part, we (I'm in Connecticut) don't have those kind of alcohol super stores (with some exceptions). I think if the retailers got behind the whole open on Sundays thing, the law prohibiting this would probably be repealed. It's more tax revenue for the state, so there are certainly many who support the abolition of the law. Generally, this issue comes up once every couple of years or so. So far, the law remains intact.

Edit: My apologies for taking this thread way, way off topic.
post #104 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fabienne
Yesterday, I got carded while attempting to buy 3 bottles of wine.

You must be ecstatic when you got carded.
post #105 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by von Rothbart
You must be ecstatic when you got carded.

Thanks for the attempt at an insult. I had realized I no longer look like a 21 year old. I think some store guidelines must be something like: "If a person looks like they are younger than 30/35, card them." At this old age of mine, I still get carded several times a year. It doesn't phase me one way or another, except that time, we were out of wine.
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