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What is worse in Europe - Page 9

post #121 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian SD
When my vietnamese girlfriend was in Paris, they wouldn't let her in quite a few places, they just said "No Japanese!"

I think it shows great diplomatic restraint on the part of the French to say "Japanese" rather than "little yellow monkey men."
post #122 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by LA Guy
Yeah, I can believe that. I would say that deeply entrenched racism is worse in Europe (than in North America or Australia. Asian cultures tend to be even more racist and tolerant of racism). I am Chinese, and some of the stuff Chinese (specifically Cantonese) people, even among the educated classes, will casually say about other ethnicities, and blacks in particular, would not go over well in the United States of Canada.
The Chinese also love to criticize provincial people, specifically calling anyone who does not know how to dress or talk, etc. peasants, bumpkins or something to that effect. Elitism is very ingrained in China despite Communism, and its effects. Actually, it's the Shanghai-nese who are supposed to be the most critical in terms of judging people from other provinces. They think people from the Jiangsu province are like blacks and Jews-dishonest and swindling. Note I am only repeating common sentiments, not my own. What the Chinese say about races would not go over well in any Western culture.
post #123 of 173
The racism towards blacks is particularly bad. I've heard Chinese people tell vacationers to avoid certain cities or neighbourhoods because there are a lot of black people there - and you wouldn't want to get mugged, right?

I'm not sure what is worse, though, the Chinese attitude where racism is socially accepted and out in the open, or the attitude I've seen among many Europeans, which is to shovel the problems under the table, or dismiss stuff like soccer fans making monkey sounds when a black player touches the ball as "harmless", and "just some idiots" when in fact a large fraction of people in the stands are making these noises, not just a few morons.
post #124 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by m@T
i booked my Thailand hotel the other week on a site with a disclaimer:

"Rates do not apply to Japanese"

Why should they? They charge ridiculous amounts for jeans and Yamamoto. They are rich. From each according to their ability, to each according to their need.
post #125 of 173
There is also discrimation against the Southeast Asians with the Chinese not to mention Jewish people as well as Slavics. The fact that they can very easily and critically dismiss people from their own provinces let's one believe they would care even less about other races. The Middle Kingdom, of course.
post #126 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by LabelKing
There is also discrimation against the Southeast Asians with the Chinese not to mention Jewish people as well as Slavics.

Oh, those are either dishonest or stupid or have funny sounding languages or are barbarians, but more often a combination of two or more of these.
post #127 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by LA Guy
Oh, those are either dishonest or stupid or have funny sounding languages or are barbarians, but more often a combination of two or more of these.
It's true. I have heard many highly placed intellectuals like Hospital Directors, engineers, et al dismiss Slavics as crudely built and ungainly while saying Jewish people are ultimately cheap and will swindle you. As for Southeast Asians, it's also a case of being dark-skinned and supposedly crude looking. They also feel Western cuisine is insipid compared to Chinese cuisine.
post #128 of 173
I can level many criticisms against the Japanese, and from extensive experience, not prejudice. I must say, however, that when I accompanied two executives from our company on a tour of the States to meet with investors last week, they displayed the utmost courtesy and impeccable manners in all situations. We stayed at the finest hotels and dined at the finest restaurants. At these times, they showed an intimate knowledge and appreciation of various cuisines and wines. Their company was always a delight.

We did not run into any discourtesy or racism on the part of anyone we dealt with, but anyone who would turn away such people merely on account of their race or nationality would be poorer, literally and figuratively, for it.
post #129 of 173
Perhaps the US is truly the least racist nation.
post #130 of 173
There have been some reports on NPR of blacks being turned away from Japanese stores. Also, one cannot deny the systemic racism against ethnic Koreans.
post #131 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kent Wang
Perhaps the US is truly the least racist nation.

Despite what we say about ourselves, this is probably the truth. No reason not to get better though.
post #132 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by iammatt
Despite what we say about ourselves, this is probably the truth. No reason not to get better though.

Actually, I would say that Canada is probably better, although it's difficult to compare because the States and Canada have significantly different pressures from immigration and Canada has less historical baggage than do the States.
post #133 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kent Wang
There have been some reports on NPR of blacks being turned away from Japanese stores. Also, one cannot deny the systemic racism against ethnic Koreans.

The Japanese hate the Koreans with a blind passion and I don't believe they're terribly well-disposed to the Chinese. A couple of years ago, the mayor of Kawasaki city made waves in the foreign community by saying "Foriegners are sneaky thieves." I believe he was talking about Chinese, Koreans, and Filipinos, who constitute the majority of the foreign population in Japan, but it was the native English speaking expats who took umbrage. No matter who it was directed at, it was an ill-considered thing to say.

Ishihara Shintaro, the mayor of Tokyo and a right-wing blowhard, once caught hell for using the term sankokujin, a wartime euphemism for Taiwanese and Koreans from Japan's colonial territories. The term was always considered a pretty serious racial slur. What Ishihara actually said was, "Sankokujin who enter the country illegally repeatedly commit malicious crimes" (my translation). Of course, Ishihara would be exactly the person to utter this and be unapolagetic about it.
post #134 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by LA Guy
Actually, I would say that Canada is probably better, although it's difficult to compare because the States and Canada have significantly different pressures from immigration and Canada has less historical baggage than do the States.
I am curious about this. Canadians do not have as much exposure to blacks and Hispanics.
post #135 of 173
Koreans seem to be pretty widely reviled.
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