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What is worse in Europe - Page 8

post #106 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fabienne
Thanks for the attempt at an insult. I had realized I no longer look like a 21 year old. I think some store guidelines must be something like: "If a person looks like they are younger than 30/35, card them." At this old age of mine, I still get carded several times a year. It doesn't phase me one way or another, except that time, we were out of wine.

I don't think he meant it as an insult...after all if you got carded and are over 21, and a woman, I would take that as a compliment.

Jon.
post #107 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kent Wang
In Texas, there are a number of gigantic all-alcohol stores such as Spec's and Grapevine Market that feature expansive selections of beer, wine and liquor. But because of the license they have to sell liquor they must close their entire on Sunday, even though their competitors can sell beer and wine on Sundays. I've heard on many occasions from these retailers that they would like to be able to keep their stores open on Sunday. Also, these mega-retailers have enough employees that they don't care really care about taking a break.
Sorry this post was so full of errors. I was under the influence of alcohol purchased from one of these said mega-retailers.
post #108 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kaga
A particularly stinging memory is from one of my Tetsujins' numerous culinary battles with Joel Robuchon, where the latter stated he loved Japanese cooking, especially nem. I think my jury had it in for him that night.

I am advised by a reliable source that this really happened. Still, nems are as ubiquitous in Paris as croissants are in Chicago.
post #109 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by SGladwell
On a related note, one thing that bugs me about Europe is the general difficulty of getting simple pain medicines, such as ibuprofen or Maalox. I like the fact that you can buy them in any supermarket, drug store, or gas station in the US, rather than having to hit up a chemist.

What?! You can even get Codeine OTC in Europe and Canada but not in the U.S. In the UK, Tylenol = Panadol.
post #110 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fabienne
Thanks for the attempt at an insult. I had realized I no longer look like a 21 year old. I think some store guidelines must be something like: "If a person looks like they are younger than 30/35, card them." At this old age of mine, I still get carded several times a year. It doesn't phase me one way or another, except that time, we were out of wine.

That wasn't intended as an insult and I am sorry you miscontrued as such.
post #111 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nantucket Red
Kaga-san,
What is nem?? I cannot even place its ethnicity.
Nem is Vietnamese--it's a group of foods like meatballs that are made of cured or processed pork.
post #112 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fabienne
ca phe sua da (as served in the best Vietnamese restaurants in Europe) also features a great many ice cubes.
I LOVE this stuff. I always get it when I go for Pho (about 3.99 for Pho in california, and 1.99 for the beverage). Best deal in town!
Quote:
In my state, I can't buy alcohol on Sundays. The first time I was denied my boeuf bourguignon, I was a bit p....., so I understand you.
In Rhode Island, you have to post a certificate that allows you to sell certain, pre-determined items on sundays. The list is ridiculously particular, and relatively long. When my vietnamese girlfriend was in Paris, they wouldn't let her in quite a few places, they just said "No Japanese!"
post #113 of 173
Isn't ca phe sua da simply some sort of a French derived drip coffee?

Many modern Vietnamese cuisine items were French hybrids. Indeed, some maintain the famous Pho as a French influenced item.
post #114 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by LabelKing
Isn't ca phe sua da simply some sort of a French derived drip coffee?

Many modern Vietnamese cuisine items were French hybrids. Indeed, some maintain the famous Pho as a French influenced item.
Was Dirk Bogarde a French influenced item?
post #115 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by RJman
Was Dirk Bogarde a French influenced item?
I'd say more Teutonic in his cerebral perversion.
post #116 of 173
Quote:
When my vietnamese girlfriend was in Paris, they wouldn't let her in quite a few places, they just said "No Japanese!"

Really?
post #117 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by Englandmj7
Really?

Yeah, I can believe that. I would say that deeply entrenched racism is worse in Europe (than in North America or Australia. Asian cultures tend to be even more racist and tolerant of racism).

I am Chinese, and some of the stuff Chinese (specifically Cantonese) people, even among the educated classes, will casually say about other ethnicities, and blacks in particular, would not go over well in the United States of Canada.
post #118 of 173
Yeah, I have lived/traveled in Europe and have been witness to the sentiments which you mentioned, but never to the extent that one might be turned away from a restaurant. It usually takes place behind people's backs.
post #119 of 173
i booked my Thailand hotel the other week on a site with a disclaimer: "Rates do not apply to Japanese"
post #120 of 173
ca phe means coffee sua means milk (in this case, condensed, but the same word either way) da means ice i get it delivered to my desk every morning for 5000 dong, abt 30 cents
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