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Collar pin survey - Page 2

post #16 of 44
I like the way Bertie Wooster pins his collar:
post #17 of 44
I think Berties is wearing a collar bar, not a pin, in the pic.
post #18 of 44
Funny, yesterday was the first time in my life I thought "gee, I wish I had a pin for this collar."

The majority of the ones I've seen worn in real life looked crappy and cheap. Occasionally someone pulls it off. I agree that it's a very dandy look.
post #19 of 44
If I found some really cheap ones I might try them.
post #20 of 44
I have a collar pin that I bought at an RL store for $5. It's one of my favorite accessories and gets a lot of attention/compliments. I just don't get to wear them too often...usually with a sweater and, of course, a club collar. Here's a (crappy quality) post of me wearing one a couple months ago. http://www.styleforum.net/showpost.p...ostcount=29633
post #21 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cravate_Noire View Post
I think Berties is wearing a collar bar, not a pin, in the pic.
This is a collar pin. I have the complete Jeeves and Wooster series on DVD. There are several scenes depicting Bertie talking to Jeeves, while Bertie puts on his jacket and tie. In one of them Bertie does use a collar bar on a shirt with eyelets, but not with this outfit. I always think it's impressive when actors can present dialog while skillfully manipulating something as tricky as a collar pin.
post #22 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by tlmusic View Post
This is a collar pin. I have the complete Jeeves and Wooster series on DVD. There are several scenes depicting Bertie talking to Jeeves, while Bertie puts on his jacket and tie. In one of them Bertie does use a collar bar on a shirt with eyelets, but not with this outfit. I always think it's impressive when actors can present dialog while skillfully manipulating something as tricky as a collar pin.
That collar pin fastening is too loose. Something that the wardrobers and actors knew but during the time this was shot, actors refused to have their necks cinched. A pin collar should have a similar fastening to a tab collar. I do this once in a while but you have to have a shirt with a forward point collar with long enough points to make it look good, something not readily available. Even when you do this with a rounded point collar, it is better to have a longer rounded point rather than a shorter one. Generally, solids, weak or pale patterns work best to show off a collar pin
post #23 of 44
I have nothing aginst them but could not wear them myself, you would be able to see it anyways.
post #24 of 44



Quote:
Originally Posted by Film Noir Buff View Post
That collar pin fastening is too loose. Something that the wardrobers and actors knew but during the time this was shot, actors refused to have their necks cinched.

Really? The way he has his collar pinned looks quite like many old 1930s photographs I have seen. His collar band certainly looks on the big side, and notice how he slouches a bit forward in this photograph. That slouch shows how his collar neck size is too big, and I think it contributed to his jackets appearing to be fitted badly at the collar. I wonder if the slouch is an intended aspect of the character.

Even if the Jeeves and Wooster television show wardrobe department disapproved, I think the slightly too relaxed collar is appropriate for the Wooster character. He is, after all, a bit of a free spirit, and perhaps would feel too constrained by the proper tight fitting English stiff collar.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Film Noir Buff View Post
A pin collar should have a similar fastening to a tab collar.

I do this once in a while but you have to have a shirt with a forward point collar with long enough points to make it look good, something not readily available.

Even when you do this with a rounded point collar, it is better to have a longer rounded point rather than a shorter one.

Generally, solids, weak or pale patterns work best to show off a collar pin

It would be great if someone could do a tutorial on collar pins and collar bars. It is rare to find any information in books or on the internet regarding this subject. Photographs of well done examples would be valuable.
post #25 of 44

..


Edited by merkur - 7/28/11 at 1:55am
post #26 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by merkur View Post
Can you have an OTR shirt collar altered such that it has collar pin/bar eyelets? Has anyone done this before?

http://www.pinshirtcollars.com/
post #27 of 44
I had the collar on one of my white shirts changed with pinning in mind. New collar points were straighter and longer. One other bit of esoterica to keep in mind is that the edge of the leaf that sits against the chest should be straighter than usual. If it has some curve, it doesn't look as good when it's pinned up. Here's a photo of Whopee that illustrates the idea - and a photo of Astaire that was my inspiration for the whole thing.

I don't wear it very often, but it always draws compliments when I do.
LL
LL
post #28 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by tlmusic View Post
Really? The way he has his collar pinned looks quite like many old 1930s photographs I have seen. His collar band certainly looks on the big side, and notice how he slouches a bit forward in this photograph. That slouch shows how his collar neck size is too big, and I think it contributed to his jackets appearing to be fitted badly at the collar. I wonder if the slouch is an intended aspect of the character. Even if the Jeeves and Wooster television show wardrobe department disapproved, I think the slightly too relaxed collar is appropriate for the Wooster character. He is, after all, a bit of a free spirit, and perhaps would feel too constrained by the proper tight fitting English stiff collar. It would be great if someone could do a tutorial on collar pins and collar bars. It is rare to find any information in books or on the internet regarding this subject. Photographs of well done examples would be valuable.
I have seen many old movies where the well dressed characters wear it in a neat, secured, tight manner. I suppose you can wear it any way you like but the smartest way is a neat, secured way. I don't know that there is a Supreme Court case settling the matter I had a conversation with someone who worked on this historical production and others and this was brought up. It was a trend during the 1990s for English actors to eschew anything tight around the neck and it had little to do with the character. It was felt that the overall look was wrong. I have some snap shots of what I feel is a nattier way to fasten the collar. I may repost them over at Devil's Island at some point with some text. Part of the problem is finding a pin short enough. Both the safety pin version and the eyelet screw bar version need to be short enough, most commercial versions are too long. I think I got the guy from highland park to make a shorter version. http://www.highlandpark.com/x4/ElegantJewelry/15w.htm For 14k gold http://www.highlandpark.com/x4/Elega...hlandpark_.jpg For Gold filled: http://www.highlandpark.com/x4/Elega...hlandpark_.jpg Silver http://www.highlandpark.com/x4/Elega...hlandpark_.jpg
post #29 of 44


Looking at the above photo from Virginia Dandy's post I really think this look requires a three-piece suit or odd waistcoat (or at the very least a buttoned jacket). In this picture the tie just seems to hang freely for no reason and that neat effect you get when the tie stands proud of the shirt from being pushed outwards by the bar (which is the entire point of a collar bar/pin, in my book) is missing.
post #30 of 44
^^^

I referred to it mostly as an example of a well-executed pinned collar, but I kind of like finding it in an unexpected setting.

I'm not cool enough to pull that off - almost always wear mine with a three-piece suit.
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