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How many meters did you row/erg today? - Page 7

post #91 of 567
It's mostly aerobic, so you won't really get bigger muscles. There's extra tension added at the initial pull, which I guess would help build 'bigger muscles', but the difference is going to be minimal. Besides, the same can be accomplished just by reducing the strokes per minute which has an applicable benefit as well.
post #92 of 567
Quote:
Originally Posted by w.mj View Post
Question for the more experienced rowers here:

I usually do 3k on a "10" setting on the theory that it will better build up muscles. Is there any advantage to doing that instead of, for example, a 5k on a "7" or am I simply mucking up my form by doing the stronger resistance?

You're mucking up form. If you want to build muscle use weights. An erg won't build mass.

I've suggested this before, but if you want to build strength on an erg do your standard workout, but do it at 16-19 spm at 5ish setting. You wan't to remain smooth on the erg, never jerky.
post #93 of 567
Quote:
Originally Posted by rjmaiorano View Post
You're mucking up form. If you want to build muscle use weights. An erg won't build mass.
I don't necessarily agree, I think this is an example of taking abstract physiological concepts too far: every way you work out your muscles is going to build mass... expect for bodybuilders over 200 pounds, the resulting size difference of your muscles between doing 3 reps of 10 on the seated row versus 300 strokes on a 2000m erg row is very minimal. Putting the erg setting on 10 and consequently doing less, more forceful strokes is going to approach weightlifting more than an aerobic 3000 rep jog, and a slightly greater muscle gain will result. Sure, putting the setting on 10 will destroy any proper "real" rowing form like you're supposed to do in a boat (unless you're rowing through a sea of mercury or something), but I have long believed that one shouldn't use 'crew' form on the erg if you're not actually training for it. It's physiologically safer to do a conservative stroke where you keep your back straight and bring the handles to your stomach, rather than doing a crew stroke where you lean far back at the end of the stroke and yank the handles up to your chest. Rowing with the setting on 10 is similar to splitting hemlock or doug fir with a maul, from what I've found both involve lots of reps but result in mass gains. Just my 2 cents.
post #94 of 567
Quote:
Originally Posted by Svenn View Post
I don't necessarily agree, I think this is an example of taking abstract physiological concepts too far: every way you work out your muscles is going to build mass... expect for bodybuilders over 200 pounds, the resulting size difference of your muscles between doing 3 reps of 10 on the seated row versus 300 strokes on a 2000m erg row is very minimal. Putting the erg setting on 10 and consequently doing less, more forceful strokes is going to approach weightlifting more than an aerobic 3000 rep jog, and a slightly greater muscle gain will result. Sure, putting the setting on 10 will destroy any proper "real" rowing form like you're supposed to do in a boat (unless you're rowing through a sea of mercury or something), but I have long believed that one shouldn't use 'crew' form on the erg if you're not actually training for it. It's physiologically safer to do a conservative stroke where you keep your back straight and bring the handles to your stomach, rather than doing a crew stroke where you lean far back at the end of the stroke and yank the handles up to your chest.
I can't agree with that. The bold that is. I spose we came from different coaching styles. Did your coach (or whomever) ever advocate using the 10 setting? For myself and my team the erg was psychological tool that better prepared you mentally for the water and was meant to simulate not so much the technical aspects of the stroke, but at least the rhythm of the stroke. Which is why doing say an 8k at 15-16 spm was so good. It developed slightly better strength, but also allowed you to gain control of your stroke. Kinda feel it out, when you slow everything down you tend notice the weak spots. But as you said, thats just my two cents.
post #95 of 567
Quote:
Originally Posted by Svenn View Post
I don't necessarily agree, I think this is an example of taking abstract physiological concepts too far: every way you work out your muscles is going to build mass... expect for bodybuilders over 200 pounds, the resulting size difference of your muscles between doing 3 reps of 10 on the seated row versus 300 strokes on a 2000m erg row is very minimal. Putting the erg setting on 10 and consequently doing less, more forceful strokes is going to approach weightlifting more than an aerobic 3000 rep jog, and a slightly greater muscle gain will result.

Sure, putting the setting on 10 will destroy any proper "real" rowing form like you're supposed to do in a boat (unless you're rowing through a sea of mercury or something), but I have long believed that one shouldn't use 'crew' form on the erg if you're not actually training for it. It's physiologically safer to do a conservative stroke where you keep your back straight and bring the handles to your stomach, rather than doing a crew stroke where you lean far back at the end of the stroke and yank the handles up to your chest.

Rowing with the setting on 10 is similar to splitting hemlock or doug fir with a maul, from what I've found both involve lots of reps but result in mass gains. Just my 2 cents.

Unless you were in the Canadian 8+ in the first half of this decade, this isn't really good "crew" form either. It's the sort of thing you see guys do on rate-restricted test pieces to get the most out of every stroke, but doing a lot of volume this way will not only increase the chances of injury, as you point out, but will also stuff up your form big-time. On the water, I've always found that the front end is where it's at.

Rather than talk about the damper (1-10) setting, which varies with altitude and how much dust is clogging the flywheel housing, I think you should take a look at the drag factor, which you can access through the utilities menu on a PM3/PM4 version of the C2. I do most of my erging at around 120-125, bumping it up to around 130 for short-distance test pieces. I find this setting forces me to get the power on with the legs early in the stroke to "catch up" with the wheel, and also doesn't kill my back even though I do a lot of low-rate work (SR 18-22).
post #96 of 567
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gattopardo View Post
Unless you were in the Canadian 8+ in the first half of this decade, this isn't really good "crew" form either. It's the sort of thing you see guys do on rate-restricted test pieces to get the most out of every stroke, but doing a lot of volume this way will not only increase the chances of injury, as you point out, but will also stuff up your form big-time. On the water, I've always found that the front end is where it's at.

I was rather surprised to see this form on quite a few boats this past olympics.
post #97 of 567
Today Id did two 2k on theergometer of my father. It was the first time in about 1 1/2 year

two times in above 8 min. (8:06 or so) I'm getting old.
post #98 of 567
Hi guys,

I've had experience using an erg in the past; when I was losing weight, I used a combination of an exercise bike and an erg for my cardio. I think my best 2k time was just under 7 minutes, something like 6:57.

Anyway, I haven't rowed for about 2 years, but loved it and am looking to get back into it. Now, however, I'm following a lifting program (Stronglifts 5x5) Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays; what kind of program should I follow to get back into using an erg? I was thinking of Tuesdays and Thursdays, but have no clue as to what kind of volume, distance etc. would be good, especially considering I won't be fully rested with all the lifting.

If it helps, I'm not an endurance kind of guy; a 2k absolutely drains me. From what I've read, you guys seem remarkably consistent with your 2ks even when doing 4 in a row. Anyway I could build up to something like that? Or perhaps some kind of HIIT (multiple 500s or something) would be better?

Any help would be much appreciated.
post #99 of 567
I'll post my results to watch my progress and to give me motivation. No Concept2 machines here so don't get surprised by what you see.

The liferower we have at the gym has 15 levels. 13-15 is called Olympic, 9-12 advanced, etc. Today I did a warmup for 3 minutes at level 7. Then I rowed for 12 minutes at level 9 at 25-26 strokes per minute. I did 6250 m in 12 minutes. When I rowed it seemed easy most of the time, but when I finished I noticed that my heart beat faster than I would expect. So, I will continue at this level for a while until I am in better shape and then I will try the higher levels. I will also try to do 4x 7minutes to get an idea of what you are doing. When you do the 4x2k do you rest between sets and how long?
post #100 of 567
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tarzan View Post
When you do the 4x2k do you rest between sets and how long?

Usually 3-4 minutes -- basically until I feel strong again but while I'm still warm. I usually stand up and parade around the gym a few times.
post #101 of 567
6k: 1:48.2
6k: 1:45.6
6K: 1:44.7

need to start doing shorter pieces though and get the balance back with my 2k.
post #102 of 567
Quote:
Originally Posted by surfnbank View Post
6k: 1:48.2
6k: 1:45.6
6K: 1:44.7

need to start doing shorter pieces though and get the balance back with my 2k.

Those are solid times if consecutive. And a pretty beastly workout too.
post #103 of 567
0m (km/cm/nm/um/etc.)
post #104 of 567
5k 20:25 min thus at speed of 2:03.
post #105 of 567
2K @ 7:11
2K @ 7:14
5K @ 19:xx
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