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How many meters did you row/erg today? - Page 32

post #466 of 567
Quote:
Originally Posted by bach View Post
ppl say my form is really messed up. this is what i think.. -the oar handle is too high at the catch -this means the blade's in pretty deep at the beginning of the drive -in order to extract the blade w/o it getting stuck at the finish, the blade gets less and less deep during the drive -this causes the oar handle to travel in a circular motion (high at the catch, traveling downwards during the drive, ending up low at the finish) -the oar's motion should be more rectangular; flat during the drive. also, how do you guys feather and square up? i've heard you let the hand closest to yr blade do all the work. do yr hands stay fixed on the oar? i.e., are yr wrists flat on the drive and then the backs of yr palms face towards you during the recovery? the other possibility is that yr wrists are flat during the recovery and then the backs of yr palms face AWAY from you during the drive. or maybe some in-between... i wanna learn how to row, but we have a coach who doesn't talk
Your biggest problem is that you drop your hands as you move up the slide. This causes your blade to lift farther off the water, so you really have to drive your hands up at the catch. Doing so causes a variety of problems: 1. You miss a lot of water. This causes your drive to be shorter and less efficient. 2. You're driving before the blade is locked in. This causes a lot of check in the boat, which slows down your forward momentum. 3. Lifting your hands so high causes your back to open early, robbing some of the power from your legs 4. You're pulling right into your lap. This is going to make it hard to get a clean finish, and it's going to throw the set off. Like you said, you need to focus on a rectangular motion. Pop your blade out at the catch and then keep your hands at that level. After you square your blade do not drop your hands. When you're a couple inches from the end of the slide start to raise your hands. Doing so will cause your blade to back itself into the water, creating a slight "v-splash". Your stroke doesn't do this well, but he is doing a better job then you. Once your back your blade into the water, hang off the arms and make your legs do the work. Once your legs have gone down, swing with the back and then pull with the arms. When you're actually rowing there will be some overlap, but think of it as a sequence. Make sure to pull in high, this will help stop you from washing out. If you can I would move your foot stretchers towards stern one notch. This will give you a little more angle at the catch. Doing so allows your legs to get connected quicker, and your finishes will be a little shorter. At the finish: Couple of inches before your handle hits your chest tap down. You tap down with the outside hand and feather with the inside one. Make sure that you tap before feathering, or else the boat will go down to your side. When you square up you once again use the inside hand; the oar just rotates in your outside hand. Inside hand takes care of feathering/squaring. Outside hand controls the level of the oar. Keep up the good work! You're obviously working hard and that's the most important thing to correcting any technical faults.
post #467 of 567
Think of your handle and pulling thru the stroke as a teardrop that's cut in half and laid on its side - that's about the shape it should make. Where the fat end of the drop is at the finish and the thin end is at the catch. That's (sort of) how you want your hands to look like.

Your coach may not like it, but watch your blade at practice sometime. Look at the shaft of the oar and ensure it's not getting wet too far up (that's what she said?). When you're working on slow paddles, feel the blade enter the water and almost have the handle push back on your hands. You should develop that habit so that the blade is in the water before you start your leg drive. Notice the backsplash from your oar. Watch at the finish when the hole in the water starts to close up on your blade. Let it close up and the water release from the finish, then GENTLY push down. It takes patience and feel. If your oar is throwing water, you're feathering too early. The oar should come out of the water and the puddle closes up, causing the water to make a vertical splash on its own.

The whole stroke takes awhile to learn the feel. I'm having to re-learn everything now that I'm sculling (16mi in the past 2 days; another 4 or 6 tonight; 6 or 8 tomorrow night). My left hand (starboard oar) is fine but the port oar requires a lot of thought because it never used to be on the oar to feel.

As for feathering, you only want to use your inside hand to feather. Your wrists should be flat on the drive, your outside flat on the recovery as well. Try to hold the oar with a little bit more of a pistol grip rather than straight across the knuckles, you will find that you have to roll your fingers rather than having to break your wrist so much.
post #468 of 567
Thread Starter 
Scrimmaged a local club crew on saturday. Took 2 of 3 pieces against them. On our best piece, we did 1000m in 2:48, taking a length of open. Midwest Championships are Sunday in Oak Ridge, Tenn. I'm so damn psyched.
post #469 of 567
Quote:
Originally Posted by wmmk View Post
Scrimmaged a local club crew on saturday. Took 2 of 3 pieces against them. On our best piece, we did 1000m in 2:48, taking a length of open. Midwest Championships are Sunday in Oak Ridge, Tenn. I'm so damn psyched.

Good luck!
post #470 of 567
My gym got brand new concept II's today!!!! So excited to pull on em! No so excited to watch the guy next to twist the damn chain with some of that stupid side pulling crap.
post #471 of 567
Thread Starter 
Laid down one of our worst pieces of the year yesterday. We started sloppy, settled to too high a rate, and didn't respond well when the cox called for moves. We ended up coming in 3rd at Midwest, and two boats in the 2V8 qualify for SRAA nationals. So this is the end of my high school rowing career. I'm crushed.
post #472 of 567
Quote:
Originally Posted by wmmk View Post
Laid down one of our worst pieces of the year yesterday. We started sloppy, settled to too high a rate, and didn't respond well when the cox called for moves. We ended up coming in 3rd at Midwest, and two boats in the 2V8 qualify for SRAA nationals. So this is the end of my high school rowing career. I'm crushed.

That's really tough dude, and I know there's not a lot anyone can say to make it feel better. It's so much worse to lose a race and know that you could've done better. The last race of my high school career we were in second the entire race, until the last 5 strokes when a school we'd beaten two weeks earlier walked through us. I still haven't really gotten over it, but it's definitely served as fuel. Next time you're in college doing a hard workout think about that race and how you felt afterward.
post #473 of 567
Is anyone at IRA this weekend? I've heard about a bit of debris out there on the course. Any other news? Predictions?

V8: UW, Harvard, Cal
2V: UW, Cal, Harvard
F8: Cal, Harvard, UW

Hmm, see a recurring trend here? I could also see Princeton edging Cal in the V8 for 3rd, but not very likely.

Princeton might be fast in the F8 as well, but not fast enough for the rest.
post #474 of 567
Quote:
Originally Posted by unclesam099 View Post
Is anyone at IRA this weekend? I've heard about a bit of debris out there on the course. Any other news? Predictions?

V8: UW, Harvard, Cal
2V: UW, Cal, Harvard
F8: Cal, Harvard, UW

Hmm, see a recurring trend here? I could also see Princeton edging Cal in the V8 for 3rd, but not very likely.

Princeton might be fast in the F8 as well, but not fast enough for the rest.

Watched online. Some exciting races! Looks like you were pretty accurate on those predictions. The Cal frosh were impressive. Just drove down the course. V8 final was awesome.
post #475 of 567
^^ Really proud of the 100% non scholarship, majority walk on squad at UCSD. Impressed to even have them qualify for IRA
post #476 of 567
Can anyone remind me the proper or most efficient way to be pushing through your feet during the stroke?

Back in college I was pretty much all off my toes, engaging mostly my quads. I never really pushed through my heels to get my glutes really engaged. Now I'm trying to start with the ball of my foot and finish with my heel (It's hard for me to keep my heel down at the catch). Does this sound semi-normal?
post #477 of 567
Quote:
Originally Posted by rjmaiorano View Post
Can anyone remind me the proper or most efficient way to be pushing through your feet during the stroke?

Back in college I was pretty much all off my toes, engaging mostly my quads. I never really pushed through my heels to get my glutes really engaged. Now I'm trying to start with the ball of my foot and finish with my heel (It's hard for me to keep my heel down at the catch). Does this sound semi-normal?

Yeah, pretty much. I've seen very few rowers with the ankle flexibility to keep the heels down at the catch.

There's a bit of ambiguity in your phrase "finish with the heel". I've found my best results have come from getting the heels down relatively quickly (by half-slide if not sooner), but I think your drag factor and some other stylistic matters could possibly make a difference.
post #478 of 567
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gattopardo View Post
Yeah, pretty much. I've seen very few rowers with the ankle flexibility to keep the heels down at the catch. There's a bit of ambiguity in your phrase "finish with the heel". I've found my best results have come from getting the heels down relatively quickly (by half-slide if not sooner), but I think your drag factor and some other stylistic matters could possibly make a difference.
Its hard to explain the dropping of the heel, but of course I want it down as soon as possible (half slide or sooner as you said) because I can engage more muscles. Good to know I am not entirely messed up in my form. And my question is regarding erg form only, I'm not a member of a club so I am not on the water. Hopefully that will change soon. But my nearest water is 50 mins away . Just trying to remember how to vomit on the erg .
post #479 of 567
Thread Starter 
I was actually taught to initiate the drive through the heel, holding connection through the toes at the finish. It can feel awkward for a while, but I do think it ends up being pretty efficient.

Anyway, today was my first day back on the water since that last race. Took out a rec single at 6AM on Lincoln Park lagoon; it was beautiful out there, and the Chicago skyline was a nice backdrop. The single felt a little unset at first (this was maybe my second time ever in a 1x), so I started out with arms and back only, and gained some confidence by the end of my row, going at about 3/4 or 7/8 slide. I'll take the same shell out tomorrow, and hopefully be in a racing shell by Wednesday.
post #480 of 567
Thread Starter 
Tuesday was a good day in the single. Got up to full slide, maybe 80% pressure, and slightly higher rates. This morning, it was thundering and raining heavily, so I erged at the boatclub. Did 4x10' (splits around 1:55, rates around 18-20), then went to take a piss in the locker room and passed a big ole kidney stone. My blood circulation got kind of temporarily messed up, I got really faint and dizzy, and the pain in my abs was giving me a hard time breathing. I ended up in the ER, but it's all good now. Hoping there's better weather tomorrow AM so I can get back on the water.
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