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Random health and exercise thoughts - Page 3800

post #56986 of 57256
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1up View Post

Speaking of which. I think I'm done cutting for summer, could be leaner but I don't think I have enough muscle to look good.

I'm 5'10, 162-165 and most clothes fit great, face looks healthy and somewhat lean, and my cardio is good.

Any approximations on a bf? 15%?

Sorry for the ridiculous pose, not sure how to do this.



Potato photo and legs not included but I'd say ~13%
post #56987 of 57256
13% seems like a good estimate. Abs and lean but no vascularity.

@lunar
With an approximate TDEE of 1800 and bodyweight of 108 lbs, you could benefit from some weight training to gain mass. I won't comment your BMI or health status as that is not my expertise. I do however think that you could see fast results in your physique and metabolism if you are somewhat new to weight lifting. Being shorter is actually a benefit here.

My advice would be to do some well known approved strength program, for instance a full body or upper lower split 3-4x a week and eat healthy food to gain weight at a slow pace (around 0.5 lbs per week).
post #56988 of 57256
I wish I could do full body workouts. I can bang out upper body stuff any time, but I have found that if I give anything less than 100% to lower body compounds I either get burnt out or injured
post #56989 of 57256
Quote:
Originally Posted by skeen7908 View Post

Potato photo and legs not included but I'd say ~13%

Yeah, really not sure how to include a bigger pic when posting from mobile.
post #56990 of 57256
Quote:
Originally Posted by conceptionist View Post

13% seems like a good estimate. Abs and lean but no vascularity.

I have very prominent bicep/shoulder/pec veins on both sides - is this typically a good indicator of bf%?
post #56991 of 57256
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sidd Finch View Post

The fuck? Uh, no. Just because you've had arguments with literally scores of posters on this site doesn't mean that I'm one of them reincarnated.

Perhaps, but your post history on this account is prettyyyy familiar.

That said, the BMI shiz is stupid on all accounts. Lets move on, shall we?
Edited by ridethecliche - 7/28/16 at 9:42am
post #56992 of 57256
Almost done with week seven and I've lost around 10-12 pounds. Strength has largely held up even though I'm not going to the gym nearly as much as I should. All good signs. At 162 right now, probably about 12% body fat. 157.8 is my initial goal to get to 10% but ultimately want to get around 155 if at all possible. Only have 3-4 weeks left, though so we'll see how far I can get.
post #56993 of 57256
Did you factor water weight into that target..... when I got off my cut all my muscles inflated like water balloons. That was a good 3-4lbs right there

Glad your cut is going well though... being leaner is quite enjoyable.
post #56994 of 57256
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1up View Post

I have very prominent bicep/shoulder/pec veins on both sides - is this typically a good indicator of bf%?
Well, people store fat in different places and vascularity will naturally be higher where you store less fat. So some people might have vascular arms at quite high bodyfat, while others won't. For me personally, definition in the quads and vascular abs are signs that I approach around 10% bodyfat. I think most guys tend to have the hardest losing fat in the lower ab region, so that could be a giveaway. Generally, you will get a more dense and somewhat flatter appearance as you approach 10%. You will look smaller in clothes but bigger without. Performance will also start to decline and you might experience hormonal changes.
post #56995 of 57256

Some fresh research. Important stuff in bold.

 

 

Interesting and practically useful study on the implications of rep speed:

 

Resistance training with slow speed of movement is better for hypertrophy and muscle strength gains than fast speed of movement. International Journal of Applied Exercise Physiology 5.2 (2016): 37-43.

 

Quote:
Repetition speed is an important variable during resistance training. However, the effects of different speeds on the muscular strength and hypertrophy in isotonic resistance training are not clear. The study compared fast speed with slow speed of isotonic resistance training on muscular strength and hypertrophy in well-trained adults. Twelve healthy adults were randomly assigned into two groups: fast speed (FS) and low speed (SS). Muscle hypertrophy was measured by an ultrasound examination of the cross-sectional area of the brachial biceps muscle. Muscular strength was verified by 1 RM test. To check the possible differences in strength and hypertrophy between pre and post training and between groups there were compared by two-way ANOVA for repeated measurements and the effect size (ES) was calculated. Improvement in the cross-sectional area (P=0.019) and muscular strength (P=0.021) in the SS group between pre and post training was verified. The SS group had bigger effect sizes than FS group for hypertrophy and strength from pre to post training. SS training was more effective to improve hypertrophy and muscle strength in well-trained adults. 
Quote:
The FS group performed repeating the following cadence: 1s in the concentric phase, 0s in the transitional phase from the concentric for the eccentric phase, 1s in the eccentric phase and 0s in the transitional phase from the eccentric to the concentric phase (1010). The SS group performed the repetitions with 1s in the concentric phase, 0s in the transitional phase from the concentric for the eccentric phase, 4s in the eccentric phase and 0s in the transitional phase from the eccentric to the concentric phase (1040). 

 

 

 

And another study on cardio, specifically HIIT vs traditional slow pace cardio.

 

PLoS One. 2016 Apr 26;11(4):e0154075. Twelve Weeks of Sprint Interval Training Improves Indices of Cardiometabolic Health Similar to Traditional Endurance Training despite a Five-Fold Lower Exercise Volume and Time Commitment.

 

Quote:
AIMS: 

We investigated whether sprint interval training (SIT) was a time-efficient exercise strategy to improve insulin sensitivity and other indices of cardiometabolic health to the same extent as traditional moderate-intensity continuous training (MICT). SIT involved 1 minute of intense exercise within a 10-minute time commitment, whereas MICT involved 50 minutes of continuous exercise per session.

METHODS: 

Sedentary men (27±8y; BMI = 26±6kg/m2) performed three weekly sessions of SIT (n = 9) or MICT (n = 10) for 12 weeks or served as non-training controls (n = 6). SIT involved 3x20-second 'all-out' cycle sprints (~500W) interspersed with 2 minutes of cycling at 50W, whereas MICT involved 45 minutes of continuous cycling at ~70% maximal heart rate (~110W). Both protocols involved a 2-minute warm-up and 3-minute cool-down at 50W.

RESULTS: 

Peak oxygen uptake increased after training by 19% in both groups (SIT: 32±7 to 38±8; MICT: 34±6 to 40±8ml/kg/min; p<0.001 for both). Insulin sensitivity index (CSI), determined by intravenous glucose tolerance tests performed before and 72 hours after training, increased similarly after SIT (4.9±2.5 to 7.5±4.7, p = 0.002) and MICT (5.0±3.3 to 6.7±5.0 x 10-4 min-1 [μU/mL]-1, p = 0.013) (p<0.05). Skeletal muscle mitochondrial content also increased similarly after SIT and MICT, as primarily reflected by the maximal activity of citrate synthase (CS; P<0.001). The corresponding changes in the control group were small for VO2peak (p = 0.99), CSI (p = 0.63) and CS (p = 0.97).

CONCLUSIONS: 

Twelve weeks of brief intense interval exercise improved indices of cardiometabolic health to the same extent as traditional endurance training in sedentary men, despite a five-fold lower exercise volume and time commitment. 
post #56996 of 57256
Whew, that cardio info is a good look. Thanks for keeping us up to date. Personally I'm still not convinced that HIIT and a caloric deficit mix, but now that I'm eating like a red blooded American again I have the recovery capacity for that intensity.

Got a breadmaker... fucking heavenly. Once I land on a good whole wheat recipe my cypher will basically be complete.
post #56997 of 57256
Doesn't the first study contradict this one?

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24734902

"Bench Press strength gains can be maximised when repetitions are performed at maximal intended velocity"
post #56998 of 57256
Quote:
Originally Posted by K. Nights View Post

Doesn't the first study contradict this one?

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24734902

"Bench Press strength gains can be maximised when repetitions are performed at maximal intended velocity"

Maybe. Haven't read it.
To be fair, you should not take a single study as "the truth". Apart from various validity concerns there's also quite a bit of statistical malpractice in the health sciences.
post #56999 of 57256
Quote:
Originally Posted by conceptionist View Post

Maybe. Haven't read it.
To be fair, you should not take a single study as "the truth". Apart from various validity concerns there's also quite a bit of statistical malpractice in the health sciences.

I completely agree. In particular, it's unfortunate that fitness studies are typically done on untrained individuals. I wonder how applicable those results are to someone who has been training for years.
This is not meant in reference to any of the above studies, just all studies on fitness in general.
post #57000 of 57256

I'm falling off the wagon, haven't gone in 2 weeks though I could've, bad sleep, tired after work, can't wake up early enough to go before, etc.

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