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Random health and exercise thoughts - Page 3795

post #56911 of 57260
Some other interesting takeaways from the video is that the Broscience guys got some things right:

1) The old school bodybuilding practice of eating small meals every 3 hours seems superior for muscle growth in comparison to "normal eating" or Intermittent Fasting. This, because the body can only use so much protein for maximum stimulation of MPS per instance (meal) (actual number is ~0.25g protein/kg BW per meal, which is often much lower than many lifters eat).
2) The almost mythical bodybuilding practice of waking up in the middle of the night to eat, seems rational since sleep is the time where we "lose" most muscle (MPB surpasses MPS). This negative effect can however be mitigated with a higher dose (40g, or 0.5g kg/BW) of slow digesting casein protein pre bed.
3) Intermittent Fasting and IIFYM or not caring about meal frequency does thus not seem to be optimal for maximum muscle growth.
post #56912 of 57260
http://mobile.journals.lww.com/nsca-jscr/_layouts/15/oaks.journals.mobile/articleviewer.aspx?year=2016&issue=07000&article=00003
Longer rest periods result in better strength adaptation and hypertrophy.
post #56913 of 57260
Quote:
Originally Posted by tesseract View Post

http://mobile.journals.lww.com/nsca-jscr/_layouts/15/oaks.journals.mobile/articleviewer.aspx?year=2016&issue=07000&article=00003
Longer rest periods result in better strength adaptation and hypertrophy.

Saw that one recently.
Quite surprising and counter intuitive finding. Interesting nonetheless.
post #56914 of 57260
Anyone have experience with patellar tendonitis? Posted a while back: after a set of dead lifts 7 weeks ago, knee started hurting hours later, pain only seems to be under knee cap and in the patellar tendon at the base and top of knee; joint feels fine. Tries rest + ice/heat and then saw a doc (surgeon for the local baseball team) who said 99% chance it's patellar tendonitis, proscribed meloxicam, which I've been taking for a week.

Week over week I think the knee is improving. But hard to tell because it's been happening for so long.

Does stretching and other knee exercises (like the stuff recommended by Coach Sommer and GST) help tendonitis? Or should I just keep doing nothing?
post #56915 of 57260
Quote:
Originally Posted by msg View Post

Anyone have experience with patellar tendonitis? Posted a while back: after a set of dead lifts 7 weeks ago, knee started hurting hours later, pain only seems to be under knee cap and in the patellar tendon at the base and top of knee; joint feels fine. Tries rest + ice/heat and then saw a doc (surgeon for the local baseball team) who said 99% chance it's patellar tendonitis, proscribed meloxicam, which I've been taking for a week.

Week over week I think the knee is improving. But hard to tell because it's been happening for so long.

Does stretching and other knee exercises (like the stuff recommended by Coach Sommer and GST) help tendonitis? Or should I just keep doing nothing?

I had it bad a few years ago from running on a short track. I got better by resting, doing decline body weight squats and wrapping my knees in those rouge fitness voodoo wraps a couple of times a day. You can also roll the knee directly on a foam roller.

Edit. I only rested from running. I did the decline squats immediately after severe pain set in.
post #56916 of 57260
Quote:
Originally Posted by conceptionist View Post

Saw that one recently.
Quite surprising and counter intuitive finding. Interesting nonetheless.

I wonder how much carryover it has to non natty lifters as I've had a good amount of success with very high rep sets lately as workout finishers.
post #56917 of 57260
Quote:
Originally Posted by tesseract View Post

http://mobile.journals.lww.com/nsca-jscr/_layouts/15/oaks.journals.mobile/articleviewer.aspx?year=2016&issue=07000&article=00003
Longer rest periods result in better strength adaptation and hypertrophy.

Damns...I was just reading a study linked on Lifehacker about how shorter rest periods are ideal for hypertrophy.
post #56918 of 57260
Quote:
Originally Posted by noob in 89 View Post

Damns...I was just reading a study linked on Lifehacker about how shorter rest periods are ideal for hypertrophy.

Brad schoenfield usually studies trained individuals which is why I like him as a researcher.
post #56919 of 57260
anyone's university got access to the full paper they can post?
post #56920 of 57260
Quote:
Originally Posted by beargonefishing View Post

I had it bad a few years ago from running on a short track. I got better by resting, doing decline body weight squats and wrapping my knees in those rouge fitness voodoo wraps a couple of times a day. You can also roll the knee directly on a foam roller.

Edit. I only rested from running. I did the decline squats immediately after severe pain set in.

How much time elapsed between onset of symptoms and returning to normal? How did you use the wraps, seen a few different recommendations
post #56921 of 57260
Lifted with an Iranian dude yesterday and he noticed our poster of Kianoush Rostami's 209 from London. Turns out this guy was his primary school classmate. Small world.
post #56922 of 57260
Quote:
Originally Posted by msg View Post

How much time elapsed between onset of symptoms and returning to normal? How did you use the wraps, seen a few different recommendations

My knee problems have not fully disappeared after 2 years. Comes back after harder/higher volume sessions.

My advice is first to rest until you have no pain outside training, then start light training such as non-weighted lunges, eccentric leg extensions, and slow decline squats. When you have no pain from that, start barbell squats and deadlifts again at a weight that cause no discomfort. Progress slowly.

Take your time to check for muscle imbalances and technique faults. Common causes are knee valgus during squats and underdeveloped hip muscles and hamstrings. You might want to train your glutes and hamstrings harder than normal during recovery if you can with lifts where you don't bend at the knee, eg. stiff leg deadlifts, hip thrusts, hip openers, hyperextensions, etc.

Outside of training you want to stay somewhat active. It is crucial to get blood flow to the joints for faster recovery. Low impact/low resistance activities such as walking/biking should be effective unless painful. Heat balms might work.

Also, I have got good results from supplementing with MSM.
post #56923 of 57260
Quote:
Originally Posted by msg View Post

How much time elapsed between onset of symptoms and returning to normal? How did you use the wraps, seen a few different recommendations

I believe I started to feel better after about 2-3 months. I used the voodoo floss by putting one right below the knee and one right above the knee, and doing some body weight squats for about 1-2 minutes once or twice a day. Ice and compression also really help (I purchased a hyperice knee brace, but some less expensive alternatives are available on amazon), especially when used right after working out. I also took a lot of advil (ibuprofen), which is a fantastic NSAID (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs).

My patellar tendonitis was primarily a result of tight quads muscles, and/or having quads that were stronger than my hamstrings. As such, using the orange colored trigger point foam roller, ice and eccentric decline squats resolved my issues. I don't do eccentric decline squats anymore, but I do use the foam roller and ice after almost every workout, and started incorporating some backward running into my 2-3 runs a week.

Hope this helps. I remember the pain, and how hard it was hard to simply walk.
post #56924 of 57260

Have started doing more sumo deadlifts. Feels pretty good and is more easy on the body (more upright = good for my low back, and less knee flexion = less pressure on the patella). Much heavier off the floor than conventional but if I clear the first inches I almost always get the lift easy.

 

Also thinking about increasing the training frequency again and cutting the amount of work per session. Would bench every session, but swap deadlift and squats for each other every other session or so. So maybe five shorter full body sessions than three very long per week.

 

Btw, on the topic of frequency:

Found this video of a discussion on the Norwegian powerlifting training style.

I knew they trained a lot, but not as much as 9 (!) squat sessions with 4 twice a day per week.

post #56925 of 57260
Quote:
Originally Posted by msg View Post

Anyone have experience with patellar tendonitis? Posted a while back: after a set of dead lifts 7 weeks ago, knee started hurting hours later, pain only seems to be under knee cap and in the patellar tendon at the base and top of knee; joint feels fine. Tries rest + ice/heat and then saw a doc (surgeon for the local baseball team) who said 99% chance it's patellar tendonitis, proscribed meloxicam, which I've been taking for a week.

Week over week I think the knee is improving. But hard to tell because it's been happening for so long.

Does stretching and other knee exercises (like the stuff recommended by Coach Sommer and GST) help tendonitis? Or should I just keep doing nothing?

I've found that two things have helped my patellar tendonitis; running a bit and taking glucosamine. Had tendonitis since high school and finally got it diagnosed at about 24. Not sure which of the two is truly what's improving things but I'd stopped both along with playing volleyball as the pain was too much. Turns out that didn't really help things any and my knee pain just ended up getting worse. I ended up going back to taking glucosamine and started jogging a bit on the treadmill and my knee pain dropped quite tremendously. Sprints end up being quite helpful here as they're short bursts, though I've been able to do about 3 or so miles without problem.

Beyond that, I find that squatting helps so long as I'm particularly careful with form. It's especially tricky with front squats as I want to shoot my knees out more and that's going to cause pain. Squatting by sitting back in more of a low bar style helps even though I keep the bar in a high bar position. I'd honestly just switch to low bar full time but it destroys my arms and shoulders.
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