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Random health and exercise thoughts - Page 3735

post #56011 of 57312
Quote:
Originally Posted by venividivicibj View Post

Did chest hard for the first time in a few weeks. Have a few bruises/marks on my left pec today

 

That's not normal.  You might have torn/pulled something.  I'd proceed with caution.

post #56012 of 57312
Quote:
Originally Posted by Reggs View Post

Are you talking about that Reddit post? Sounds difficult to imagine what it would taste like. Is vegetarian ramen with vegetable fat a common menu item?

It's more that a lot of vegetable stocks/stews are often somewhat thin/unsatisfying due to lack of unctuousness given by fat in the broth (even when skimmed). Ivan went with his vegetable fat as a way of fixing that problem with his ramen. Kenji used mushroom scallion ramen with his. A lot of italian soups/stews will use a drizzle of extra virgin olive oil, for example.
post #56013 of 57312

Been making lots of edamame sphagetti with pesto, doesn't taste the greatest but the macros are crazy and it's vegetables + carbs + protein in one dish.

 

post #56014 of 57312
Quote:
Originally Posted by accordion View Post

Been making lots of edamame sphagetti with pesto, doesn't taste the greatest but the macros are crazy and it's vegetables + carbs + protein in one dish.



Now I'm not aware of the exact form of protein in that meal, but you know that not all protein is equal?

Eggs and milk products are best (you can look up what I mean with "best"), followed by lean meat, then fattier cuts, etc, and last veggies. Combining sources can however yield optimal protein content.
post #56015 of 57312
First day trying the vegetable shake this morning. Didn't taste so bad.
post #56016 of 57312
Quote:
Originally Posted by conceptionist View Post

Now I'm not aware of the exact form of protein in that meal, but you know that not all protein is equal?

Eggs and milk products are best (you can look up what I mean with "best"), followed by lean meat, then fattier cuts, etc, and last veggies. Combining sources can however yield optimal protein content.

You're not aware of that exact protein, and yet you're parroting another supplement industry half-truth. Edamame (soy) is pretty much identical to milk proteins, minus the saturated fat, cholesterol and lactose. It also comes with a boatload of fibre and micronutrients.

And frankly, "optimal protein" is way overstated. If you're eating a variety of different veggie sources (e.g. the classic beans and brown rice) you are probably meeting the "optimal protein" ideal. And the stuff about digestibility is also way overstated.
Edited by hendrix - 2/20/16 at 5:14pm
post #56017 of 57312
Quote:
Originally Posted by tesseract View Post

diverticulitis?
No, vascular issues. High risk for sudden cardiac death or stroke. Runs in the family. Several close relatives including both grandmothers never made it to 50, even more relatives - aunts and uncles - never saw 60. Dad dropped dead, literally, three years ago. For me the specific issue is PAD in my legs, which is ironic sense I used to be an avid cyclist and have always been a runner as well as fit overall. Had a risky bypass surgery on the left leg several years ago, and now having problems with the right one. I've decided against surgery, it would be an even riskier one than the previous one. I've opted for a change in diet to hopefully halt progression. So far I've been amazed at the noticeable improvement in health stats after only 7 weeks with the dietary changes. It's phenomenal to me how the body can repair itself.
post #56018 of 57312
Quote:
Originally Posted by hendrix View Post


You're not aware of that exact protein, and yet you're parroting another supplement industry half-truth. Edamame (soy) is pretty much identical to milk proteins, minus the saturated fat, cholesterol and lactose. It also comes with a boatload of fibre and micronutrients.

And frankly, "optimal protein" is way overstated. If you're eating a variety of different veggie sources (e.g. the classic beans and brown rice) you are probably meeting the "optimal protein" ideal. And the stuff about digestibility is also way overstated.

There's something to be said about antinutritional factors in plant proteins (eg. trypsin inhibitors, phytates, tannins etc) and bioactive peptides in milk, specifically undenatured whey concentrate.

 

The antinutritional factors can be largely mitigated during preparation and the effect in young, healthy persons probably isn't significant, but that changes depending on population

post #56019 of 57312
Quote:
Originally Posted by MGoCrimson View Post

There's something to be said about antinutritional factors in plant proteins (eg. trypsin inhibitors, phytates, tannins etc) and bioactive peptides in milk, specifically undenatured whey concentrate.

The antinutritional factors can be largely mitigated during preparation and the effect in young, healthy persons probably isn't significant, but that changes depending on population

"anti-nutrients" is largely a term used out of context. The dose makes the poison, and we actually know that a lot of those compounds are good for us when they come as part of a whole food. Yes, they make absorption of some nutrients a bit harder - which is only a problem if you're at risk of being deficient in these nutrients. And yeah, as you mentioned, a bit of processing eliminates them, if you want to do that - e.g. something like tofu is going to absorb just as easily as meat, where as whole soy beans might absorb a little less efficiently; but again you're missing out on some fibre and healthy "anti-nutrients".

Basically, to think of them as a bad thing is to miss the forest for the trees.
post #56020 of 57312
Quote:
Originally Posted by hendrix View Post


"anti-nutrients" is largely a term used out of context. The dose makes the poison, and we actually know that a lot of those compounds are good for us when they come as part of a whole food. Yes, they make absorption of some nutrients a bit harder - which is only a problem if you're at risk of being deficient in these nutrients. And yeah, as you mentioned, a bit of processing eliminates them, if you want to do that - e.g. something like tofu is going to absorb just as easily as meat, where as whole soy beans might absorb a little less efficiently; but again you're missing out on some fibre and healthy "anti-nutrients".

Basically, to think of them as a bad thing is to miss the forest for the trees.

 

Antinutrients are a class of compounds that inhibit the absorption of nutrients. There isn't anything healthy about them. Perhaps you mean to say they are present in most plant foods, which have a variety of benefits. 

 

Antinutrients — not a reason to avoid plant foods. They are a reason to reconsider dietary choices if you have health conditions where specific antinutrients may increase the risk of aggravating said condition. And a reason to reconsider using blanched soy beans as a major source of protein. 

post #56021 of 57312
Quote:
Originally Posted by JayJay View Post

No, vascular issues. High risk for sudden cardiac death or stroke. Runs in the family. Several close relatives including both grandmothers never made it to 50, even more relatives - aunts and uncles - never saw 60. Dad dropped dead, literally, three years ago. For me the specific issue is PAD in my legs, which is ironic sense I used to be an avid cyclist and have always been a runner as well as fit overall. Had a risky bypass surgery on the left leg several years ago, and now having problems with the right one. I've decided against surgery, it would be an even riskier one than the previous one. I've opted for a change in diet to hopefully halt progression. So far I've been amazed at the noticeable improvement in health stats after only 7 weeks with the dietary changes. It's phenomenal to me how the body can repair itself.

Might want to look into the benefits of heat shock proteins. Just something to consider.
post #56022 of 57312
Quote:
Originally Posted by hendrix View Post

You're not aware of that exact protein, and yet you're parroting another supplement industry half-truth. Edamame (soy) is pretty much identical to milk proteins, minus the saturated fat, cholesterol and lactose. It also comes with a boatload of fibre and micronutrients.

And frankly, "optimal protein" is way overstated. If you're eating a variety of different veggie sources (e.g. the classic beans and brown rice) you are probably meeting the "optimal protein" ideal. And the stuff about digestibility is also way overstated.

My point was not necessarily to criticize that specific meal, but that you should not blindly just read the macros and take them for granted. For example, the protein content of some cheaper protein bars is basically useless, thus reducing the actual amount of protein in the bar.
post #56023 of 57312
Quote:
Originally Posted by MGoCrimson View Post

Antinutrients are a class of compounds that inhibit the absorption of nutrients. There isn't anything healthy about them.

Sorry mate that's just straight up wrong.
post #56024 of 57312
Quote:
Originally Posted by conceptionist View Post

My point was not necessarily to criticize that specific meal, but that you should not blindly just read the macros and take them for granted. For example, the protein content of some cheaper protein bars is basically useless, thus reducing the actual amount of protein in the bar.
Real protein is expensive. I remember back when I used to make my own protein bars. The yield per $$$ was surprisingly low
post #56025 of 57312
Quote:
Originally Posted by hendrix View Post

You're not aware of that exact protein, and yet you're parroting another supplement industry half-truth. Edamame (soy) is pretty much identical to milk proteins, minus the saturated fat, cholesterol and lactose. It also comes with a boatload of fibre and micronutrients.

And frankly, "optimal protein" is way overstated. If you're eating a variety of different veggie sources (e.g. the classic beans and brown rice) you are probably meeting the "optimal protein" ideal. And the stuff about digestibility is also way overstated.

Is there anything to the idea that consumption of soy is bad for men due to the estrogen content? Or has that been completely debunked by actual science as well?
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