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Random health and exercise thoughts - Page 3733

post #55981 of 57260
I with basically the premise of reducing animal suffering and environmental degredation. I also felt like I hit major rut cooking-wise by focusing so much cooking on meat.

The harm reduction approach also allows you to justify eating meat once in a while if there are no non-meat options, it's a special occasion etc., though after doing it for a few months, i've somewhat lost the taste of meat though and i definitely enjoy it less. Also dem seitan macros.

Vegan is too hard though--also i'm allergic to avocados (mayo replacement) and almonds (used in cheese replacement) so I'm happy with being just a vegetarian.
post #55982 of 57260
Quote:
Originally Posted by hendrix View Post

It was an overnight decision for me.

I'm a biomedical scientist. I've killed hundreds of mice to perform experiments on them. The reason I'm comfortable with this is because a) the experiments could not be performed without animal models and b) the experiments would result in knowledge that might some day be beneficial to human health.

In fact, those are the criteria that researchers must fulfill before they're granted permission to experiment by the ethics committees. If I could perform these experiments on cell lines or biochemical assays instead of mice, I would do that instead. This is pretty much the same all over the world: if you don't need to harm an animal, you shouldn't.

One day it struck me that I wasn't applying these same ethics to my life choices. I don't need to cause the suffering and death of animals by contributing to the industries responsible. So I don't. Pretty simple.

I'm a non-apologetic carnivore, but have certainly had some of the same thoughts as you. That's why I go for free range chicken/eggs and pasture-raised (grass-fed, if possible) beef/lamb/bison. I've always been more about quality of life than length (as a general principle). This decision isn't entirely selfless, though. I'm convinced that the better raised the animals, the healthier they will be for me to consume. I don't know the life expectancy of a cow or chicken, so not sure how much I'm cutting off, but I can live with eating meat that's from animals who suffered for seconds (if that), instead of their entire lives.
post #55983 of 57260
Quote:
Originally Posted by hendrix View Post

It was an overnight decision for me.

I'm a biomedical scientist. I've killed hundreds of mice to perform experiments on them. The reason I'm comfortable with this is because a) the experiments could not be performed without animal models and b) the experiments would result in knowledge that might some day be beneficial to human health.

In fact, those are the criteria that researchers must fulfill before they're granted permission to experiment by the ethics committees. If I could perform these experiments on cell lines or biochemical assays instead of mice, I would do that instead. This is pretty much the same all over the world: if you don't need to harm an animal, you shouldn't.

One day it struck me that I wasn't applying these same ethics to my life choices. I don't need to cause the suffering and death of animals by contributing to the industries responsible. So I don't. Pretty simple.

I stopped sport fishing for pretty much the same reason - the fact that I was using another creature's torment strictly for my pleasure eventually began to nag at me. Logically I'm in the same place as you food wise, but for whatever reason It doesn't effect me emotionally yet, so I continue to eat meat. I've been thinking the past year or so that maybe one day my feelings will line up with my thoughts and I will end up giving it up.
post #55984 of 57260
Quote:
Originally Posted by RedLantern View Post

I stopped sport fishing for pretty much the same reason - the fact that I was using another creature's torment strictly for my pleasure eventually began to nag at me.

I think it's not really a black and white issue though. For example: the money you paid for your fishing license goes toward the preservation of the lakes and rivers, which is good for the fish as a whole. Hunting/fishing (when regulated) is usually more a benefit than a detriment to the animal populations in question.

Definitely not saying you should keep doing something you're uncomfortable with, however.
post #55985 of 57260
Quote:
Originally Posted by Reggs View Post


Yes, but not a whole lot. Some ice and just a bit of water.

Speaking of ice, this is an amazing ice tray:

http://www.amazon.com/OXO-Good-Grips-No-Spill-Silicone/dp/B007U256D2/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1455698523&sr=8-1&keywords=oxo+ice+tray

I was looking at getting those bigger 'king ice cubes' they have, but i kept reading reviews about how the silicon was excreting stuff onto the ice

post #55986 of 57260
Took a bod pod test today, I'm 8.8% body fat with a 2% margin of error. Going to celebrate with some Waffle House tonight.
post #55987 of 57260
I have been relying on arching too much for bench and it's pretty much taken my chest out of the lift. How do I build a stable base to bench from without a crazy arch? And would it be worth doing some "legs up" benching for some of my bench work?
post #55988 of 57260
Can you just not arch?
I wouldn't raise your feet as it will just make you weaker, leg drive is a good thing. But retracting your scapula and shrugging should give you a plenty solid base without arching.
post #55989 of 57260
Quote:
Originally Posted by OccultaVexillum View Post

Can you just not arch?
I wouldn't raise your feet as it will just make you weaker, leg drive is a good thing. But retracting your scapula and shrugging should give you a plenty solid base without arching.

 

The scapula should not be shrugged up, but pinched together and pulled down.

post #55990 of 57260
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cool The Kid View Post

I have been relying on arching too much for bench and it's pretty much taken my chest out of the lift. How do I build a stable base to bench from without a crazy arch? And would it be worth doing some "legs up" benching for some of my bench work?

What shoes are you wearing?
post #55991 of 57260
Quote:
Originally Posted by conceptionist View Post

The scapula should not be shrugged up, but pinched together and pulled down.
Yea sometimes when I bench I feel it in my lats. I think my base is OK from my waist up. It's my hips and legs that I need to recalibrate. I am going to have to scale back the leg drive significantly. I'm trying to switch to a BB style bench that won't wreck my shoulders.
post #55992 of 57260
Quote:
Originally Posted by OzzyJones View Post

I'm not fully buying the merits of animal models as relevant to human.
I think if you want to find out if something works on people, test it on them.
I don't think human life is more valuable than any other tho, there are too many of us for a start. Cut some up, reduce the burden on society

I value human life more than I value animal life. YMMV.

There are also slightly grey areas. For example, if there are invasive species that are destroying the native wildlife, I'm comfortable with the idea of trapping/killing them to preserve the lives of endangered animals.

Basically it comes down to this, for me; if you're going to kill an animal there should be a good reason for it. I can no longer consider food as a good reason for it, given that I know I can be perfectly well sustained and happy on a plant based diet.

re: animal models. You're right to question the validity of animal models in relation to human disease. It's a very important consideration. However, in certain areas they are absolutely useful, and I would rather test a hypothesis on an animal than a human...
post #55993 of 57260
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cool The Kid View Post


Yea sometimes when I bench I feel it in my lats. I think my base is OK from my waist up. It's my hips and legs that I need to recalibrate. I am going to have to scale back the leg drive significantly. I'm trying to switch to a BB style bench that won't wreck my shoulders.

 

A moderate arch, medium wide grip and some tucking (bar touches lower on the chest) is safe for the shoulders. Likewise, a max width grip and big arch, that is the most efficient PL technique, is also safe on the shoulder joint.

The most important aspect is that you manage to keep the shoulder locked back and down during the whole movement. Its when the scapula follows up on 

the press and the shoulders flare out too early that you get problems with the shoulder joint.

post #55994 of 57260
Quote:
Originally Posted by hendrix View Post


re: animal models. You're right to question the validity of animal models in relation to human disease. It's a very important consideration. However, in certain areas they are absolutely useful, and I would rather test a hypothesis on an animal than a human...

Plus, even if it were possible to test hypotheses on human subjects, where are you going to find a study cohort genetically identical enough to control the experiment (an advantage of mice bred for the lab).
post #55995 of 57260
Quote:
Originally Posted by TimelesStyle View Post

Plus, even if it were possible to test hypotheses on human subjects, where are you going to find a study cohort genetically identical enough to control the experiment (an advantage of mice bred for the lab).

yeah this. it's so difficult to get statistically significant results from a heterogeneous population. But with inbred mice every experiment is very repeatable.
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