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Random health and exercise thoughts - Page 3642

post #54616 of 57260
Quote:
Originally Posted by OccultaVexillum View Post

is that the only gym on campus? If there's a Y around they usually have income based membership and in every city and every Y I've been to student = no income = free membership.
In your situation with your injuries though I feel like you have a pretty good idea of what you can and can't do and what you "need" out of a gym though, so if the campus one sucks then something else might be your only option. Or take heed of what you said before and get heavy into the stuff out of the gym (climbing, cycling, hiking etc) and just lift basic full body 2x week. Priotize the other stuff.

 

The Y is across town. Not long by most people's standards but...


I could probably get by using only this gym. If I join the rock gym, then that gives me access to some more weights.

 

There's also always planet fitness. Blegh. 

Although, it might just work....

post #54617 of 57260
i switched from a normal decent gym to a crowded and shitty bro gym without any barbells, around 5 months ago due to moving. The consequence is that ive been doing more DB press ,shoulders and arms, its not too bad. Im doing deadlifts in the smith machine (standing on some wooden box to get the angles of the floor right)....
post #54618 of 57260
Smith machines get a bad rap due to the dumb stuff people tend to do in them, but they're really quite useful in the case of injury or the lack of other equipment.

Bent rows, reverse bench/guillotine/other bench variations, BTN presses, etc - all good stuff that can be done.
post #54619 of 57260
I just think I had really good results with the seated cable rows and I'm trying to figure out what i can substitute for that. There's a machine but it feels weird for now.

Bent over rows would be great but i can't do those. Might try working in standing cable rows and DB rows.
post #54620 of 57260
Lay prone on an incline bench and do Db rows with a pause. And lots of face pulls. I really miss being able to use cables and both of those movements work well for me.
post #54621 of 57260
Quote:
Originally Posted by OccultaVexillum View Post

Lay prone on an incline bench and do Db rows with a pause. And lots of face pulls. I really miss being able to use cables and both of those movements work well for me.

 

Oh I could definitely try the first one. I plan on doing lots of face pulls.

I miss how thick my back was just 3 months ago. It's ridiculous that it goes away so freaking fast!

post #54622 of 57260
Depends on what you're able to do, but I really enjoy Meadows rows if you're looking for a 1-arm variation.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AY4YjAHcWrw
post #54623 of 57260
NYC guys what did you do for a guarantor?
post #54624 of 57260
parents
post #54625 of 57260
Lucky you. My parents are paranoid and would never provide the information required. Might have to go through a guarantor company or prepay rent or have a larger security deposit. Really hoping this apt goes through, we'll be on Elizabeth and Grand.
post #54626 of 57260
Mmm yea thats a tricky situation. Never thought about that. I either used my parents or had the income
post #54627 of 57260

Those of you who cut might want to read this study.

 

It seems like it takes a deficit of about 4,500 cals to lose a pound of fat, not the commonly referred to 3,500 cals.

 

Quote:
The caloric deficit required for a pound of body weight loss is reported to be 3,500 kilocalories (Wishnofsky, 1960). However, published articles, textbooks, and professional organizations equate a pound of fat mass loss to 3,500 kilocalories (Applegate, 2011; Mayo Clinic, 2012; Kravitz, 2007; Cerrato, 1987). The purpose was to perform a theoretical review pertaining to caloric deficits required for equivalent changes in body composition, body weight, and fat mass loss. An online database search was performed using key words such as adipose tissue, adipose cell, body composition, body weight loss, fat mass loss, adipose loss, diet, direct calorimetry, and 3,500 calories. 43 articles met the inclusion and exclusion criteria, 28 of which were used for calculating caloric equivalents. The differences in caloric deficit required for a pound of body weight loss, adipose tissue loss, and fat mass loss was compared to the calculated theoretical caloric equivalent for a pound of fat mass loss. A percent error measurement was calculated between the theoretical caloric equivalent for a pound of fat mass loss to the caloric equivalents for a pound of body weight loss, adipose tissue loss, and fat mass loss. The energy equivalent of body weight loss varied considerably, dependent upon the constituent portions of fat, water, protein, carbohydrate and mineral lost. Adipose tissue also varied with type and was dependent upon the composition of lipid, water, and protein. The most valid theoretical equivalent for a pound of fat was calculated at 4,423.90 kilocalories (Péronnet & Massicotte, 1991) based on in vivo extraction of human intracellular lipid samples. The calculated percent errors between the theoretical caloric equivalent for a pound of pound of fat mass and published, accepted values for a pound of body weight loss, dietary lipid loss, adipose tissue loss, and fat mass loss were 20.88%, 7.65%, 15.23%, and 20.88%, respectively. Studies and professional organizations have equated a pound of body weight loss to 3,500 kilocalories, a pound of adipose tissue to 3,750 kilocalories, and a pound of fat mass to 3,500 kilocalories (Wishnofsky, 1960; Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 2010; AHA, 2010, 2014; Applegate, 2011; Mayo Clinic, 2012; Brown, 2001; McArdle, 2010). Contrary to this, a pound of fat mass loss is equal to 4,423.90 kilocalories, and this severely underestimates the caloric values needed to achieve desired fat mass loss. This use of the proper caloric value for fat mass loss has the potential to improve exercise and nutrient recommendations for achieving healthy body fat values.

A theoretical analysis examining the construct of a pound of fat equaling 3,500 kilocalories

http://csus-dspace.calstate.edu/handle/10211.3/139453

post #54628 of 57260
Interdasting
post #54629 of 57260
Quote:
Originally Posted by jarude View Post

Good to know. How does the intensity vary for you from day-to-day? Week-to-week? Do you alternate light/heavy or how does your coach go about it?

 

It varies on many levels. I honestly cannot comprehend it fully. That's why I think most people should just chose a solid and well known program, such as Sheiko, if they want to get strong, since the programs are too complex for the general lifter to understand or be able to make themselves.

 

Anyway, a given week can look something like this:

 

Day 1: heavy squat (2-3 reps 4-5 sets 80%), heavy bench (2-3 reps 4-5 sets 80-85%), lighter stiff leg deadlifts (4-6 reps 50-60% of DL 1RM).

Day 2: medium OL pause squat (2-5 reps 2-4 sets 60-70% of SQ 1RM), medium heavy FU bench (4-6 reps 2-4 sets, 60-70% of bench 1RM), heavy deadlift (1-3 reps 2-4 sets 80-90%)

Day 3: heavy squat (2-3 reps 4-5 sets 80%), heavy bench (2-3 reps 4-5 sets 80-85%), light OL pause squat (2-5 reps 2-4 sets 55-65% of SQ 1RM)

Day 4: medium OL pause squat (2-5 reps 2-4 sets 60-70% of SQ 1RM), inc bench (4-6 reps 3-5 sets 55-60% bench 1RM), heavy low board press (1-2 reps 2-3 sets 90%), deficit deadlifts (2-5 reps 3-5 sets 65-75%)

Day 5: heavy squat (2-3 reps 4-5 sets 80%), medium heavy bench (2-3 reps 4-5 sets 80%), snatch grip deadlifts (4-6 reps 65-70% of DL 1RM), block deadlifts (2-4 resp 3-5 sets 85-90%).

 

Not counting warmups and accessories.

 

That got a bit harder to read than I first though. Anyway, heavy days are often followed by lighter days. I rarely do all 3 lifts heavy in one session, but it still happens. In the same way, some days all lifts are rather easy. When I say heavy, I could often do 2-4 reps more. Light means maybe I could do 4-5 reps more. So when the weight is heavier (by using the standard version of the lifts, not variations that force the weights to be less), the program also has me working higher on the RPE scale.

 

Its also broken down on a week to week basis so that some weeks are tough and some are a breeze. but within those weeks I still have lighter and tougher days. Months are broken into preparatory (higher reps, higher volume, less specific, lower intensity), transition (little lower reps, decent high volume, more specific, intensity ramped up), competition (low reps, less volume, very specific, higher intensity).

post #54630 of 57260

Also @jarude

 

Since you seem to be interested in the bulgarian method (very high frequency, daily maxing, etc):

 

One of the weightlifters at the club is currently in bulgaria on a training camp with their national WL coach (Ivan Abadjiev, IIRC).

Hes also had contact with John Broz. 

Gonna ask him a lot of questions when he comes back.

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