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Random health and exercise thoughts - Page 3497

post #52441 of 57266
Quote:
Originally Posted by venividivicibj View Post
 

 

Used to take this, but after a few 3rd party studies showed MP protein spikes the crap out of their stuff, I stopped. Some of their protein powders only had about 50-60% of the claimed protein.


Ahhh shit! This was a shit purchase! Thanks for the heads up! Which powders do you recommend?

 

http://www.chimicles.com/musclepharm-combat-protein-powder-spiking-class-action-lawsuit

post #52442 of 57266
Costco has an amazing return policy, they might take it back.

As for recommendations, someone posted PES select protein, which is currently on sale through bodybuilding.com, I posted about Pro Jym. There was another one too, can't remember off the top of my head. Of course you could go with Bodybuilding's foundation series if you wanted just whey isolate rather than a blend
post #52443 of 57266
My PES insider order arrives tomorrow -- only opted for 10lbs. Perfect timing because I just finished my 16lbs from the last insider deal.
post #52444 of 57266

I got my order today. So good.

 

If you guys are looking for a flavored blend get PES Select. They're generally pretty sweet across the board.

 

If looking to make your own blend / get bulk powders go Nutrabio. The vanilla basically tastes like slightly sweetened milk.

post #52445 of 57266
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lagrangian View Post

like I said earlier, there are very very very few people ITT who even have the work capacity to achieve actual overtraining.

I've seen EWC level lifters who've been ground to bits on Bulgarian type programming with 4hr+ DAILY lifting if not more which had gone on for years and years. of course the main reason there being that there was no special restoratives like abadjiev would say..

but that's another matter.

I wish I had a training log as I don't really know which kind of programming I am on. I just come in and do the work the coach tells me. Sessions last 2-3hrs and there's plenty of max effort stuff which I think is to be expected. But As I said perhaps I am just not eating enough.
post #52446 of 57266
@Khayembii Communique
You look to be around 20% bf.
Imoossible to say why you don't look a certain way (chest). Could be bad insertions, genetics, bad training (not actually training the chest) or simply too fat to see definition.

APT doesn't look too bad. You should gain mobility in your hip flexors and your quads (stretching and full ROM when you lift) and simultaneously strengthen your glutes. Finally, strive to never get into a bad "APT" position. Stand and sit correctly.
Quote:
Originally Posted by skeen7908 View Post

IMO this idea cant overtrain hurr durr just lift is bullshit

Some people have genetically appalling recovery abilities.

You can't look at people who become successful weightlifters/bodybuilders/athletes etc and extrapolate their experience to the average genetic trash that inhabits forums desperately looking for advice

The two groups are pre-selected: the former to respond well to large training volumes, the latter to respond poorly

I imagine there are many people on internet forums who actually TRAIN TOO MUCH OR TOO HARD. These people are fucking desperate to get strong/shredded, and will do anything, obsessing all day about how they can improve. No way on earth they are not going to train like fuck if they could get away with it/benefit from it

I very much doubt you overtrain on 4 days a week.
Obviously you will OVERREACH for a certain amount of time, that is, training more than before will cause a new adaption and will be tough. Its expected that you get weak or get slower progress in the beginning when you have increased training volume (as a function fo the frequency, for instance).

When I went from 3x to 5x a week, everything felt shit and heavy for 3 months. Squatting at 70% felt like 90%. Was way wesker each session than when I trained less. Now, half a year later, I have adapted. I am now about as fatigued every session doing 5x a week as I were when I did 3x a week. Now I get a much higher training volume due to tje higher frequency, so I make faster progress.

I tend to overreach in the prep cycle, e.g. the first training cycle before a meet. That is almost always needed to cause the best supercompensation effect when the volume is scaled back in the taper (last training cycle) leading up to the meet.

Overtraining on the other hand means that you train yourself into the ground, involving insomnia, depression, lack of motivation, etc. Not to be confused with overreaching, which is needed in periods for the best training effects.
post #52447 of 57266
Most of rhet seems delusional about how high bf% they are and how much muscle they have on them.



matt ogus at 5'6" 155" and prob a tiny bit under 8%. Looks a lot bigger then most guys on rhet.
post #52448 of 57266
Everyone looks bigger cut down tho breh. I agree most people here are prob in the mid teens tho but even people with damn near no muscle mass look decent legit shredded.
post #52449 of 57266
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lagrangian View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by skeen7908 View Post

I overtrain at 4 times a week. I make better progress on 3 or even 2

But I have shitty genetics, fragile gracile joints and tendons, and I work 60 hours a week in a reasonably physical job

Gross generalizations are rarely if ever accurate, so I stay away from them

I was talking about the variety that takes people up to a year to actually fix, not just some general lack of progress.


I dont even understand what this means



I very much doubt you overtrain on 4 days a week.
Obviously you will OVERREACH for a certain amount of time, that is, training more than before will cause a new adaption and will be tough. Its expected that you get weak or get slower progress in the beginning when you have increased training volume (as a function fo the frequency, for instance).

When I went from 3x to 5x a week, everything felt shit and heavy for 3 months. Squatting at 70% felt like 90%. Was way wesker each session than when I trained less. Now, half a year later, I have adapted. I am now about as fatigued every session doing 5x a week as I were when I did 3x a week. Now I get a much higher training volume due to tje higher frequency, so I make faster progress.

I tend to overreach in the prep cycle, e.g. the first training cycle before a meet. That is almost always needed to cause the best supercompensation effect when the volume is scaled back in the taper (last training cycle) leading up to the meet.

Overtraining on the other hand means that you train yourself into the ground, involving insomnia, depression, lack of motivation, etc. Not to be confused with overreaching, which is needed in periods for the best training effects.[/quote]


A lot of semantics here

Overtraining = training beyond capacity of body to adapt to stimuli

If youre trying to add weight/reps to the bar and not making progress the most likely readon is that you are overtraining

If I try to train 4 days a week, I go backwardd. Perhaps Im training too hard, not periodizing enough, but whatever the cause its still overtraining

Quote:
Originally Posted by fuji View Post

Most of rhet seems delusional about how high bf% they are and how much muscle they have on them.



matt ogus at 5'6" 155" and prob a tiny bit under 8%. Looks a lot bigger then most guys on rhet.

So much this
post #52450 of 57266
Quote:
Originally Posted by Khayembii Communique View Post

5'7 198
Despite skeen's comment bein quite direct, he's spot on. You're somewhere between 20 and 25% bodyfat. From my point of view I wouldn't care the least what I lift if it's not for some exact athletic goal of contest or whatever, there simply no reason to be fat if it's not to score high in a contest where the additional mass helps you get some more strength. I'd go on a cut until you're around 15% and then you could consider again to go for the 1000 lbs goal or whatever, the point right now is clearly not asthetic. Except for the arms it looks DYEL.

I'm probably around 15% bf now and I'm 5'9" at 159 lbs and sorry, but you don't look like you'd snap me like a twig.

I think there's some major mental problems that many of us here have that have been mentioned here in the past:
- Bulking to get big but never cutting to get aesthetically pleasing
- Looking at figures for lifts when you don't even compete (aesthetics = mirror != numbers)
- Blatant underestimation of bodyfat (oh hey, I can see my first abs in perfect lighting, I must be at 10%)
- Being believers in the Church of Supps (I'm guilty of this one too because there's nothing like nuking your brain with 400mg of coffein in a PWO)
The list could go on with system jumping, bro science, etc.
post #52451 of 57266
Quote:
Originally Posted by skeen7908 View Post

If youre trying to add weight/reps to the bar and not making progress the most likely readon is that you are overtraining

If I try to train 4 days a week, I go backwardd. Perhaps Im training too hard, not periodizing enough, but whatever the cause its still overtraining
 

 

No, the reason for not making progress could many other things.

- lack of recovery (not eating or sleeping enough)

- bad programming (most likely)

- you are adapting to a higher stimuli, e.g. workload. Of course you will be weaker if you all of a sudden start doing more. Over time you will adapt to the higher workload so you can train with the higher workload in a given time frame so you'll continue to make progress. In order to make progress (in muscle mass or strength) the workload absolutely has to go up over time. Thats how you cause new adaptions. Increasing volume or frequency is one way to increase the workload, just as increasing the intensity (weights) is. The intensity is just one of the variables, not the only.

 

Simply saying "not making progress" equals overtraining is directly false. That, if anything, is the old bodybuilding myth that keeps people from making progress. Of course, you should not train too much in a session a la a typical arm-day (that is not what I am referring to), but rather the fact that people are so afraid of not making progress that they never allow themselves to get weaker for a period of time. They do not seem to understand that you in many instances need to be weaker for a while (in the short perspective) to get stronger (in the long perspective).

 

That's just one of the reasons people stay on their 3/4/5 splits or whatever, and are afraid to squat again when they still have doms. You don't get anything extra from being fresh and setting PRs every single session.

post #52452 of 57266
Quote:
Originally Posted by conceptionist View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by skeen7908 View Post

If youre trying to add weight/reps to the bar and not making progress the most likely readon is that you are overtraining


If I try to train 4 days a week, I go backwardd. Perhaps Im training too hard, not periodizing enough, but whatever the cause its still overtraining

 

No, the reason for not making progress could many other things.
- lack of recovery (not eating or sleeping enough)
- bad programming (most likely)
- you are adapting to a higher stimuli, e.g. workload. Of course you will be weaker if you all of a sudden start doing more. Over time you will adapt to the higher workload so you can train with the higher workload in a given time frame so you'll continue to make progress. In order to make progress (in muscle mass or strength) the workload absolutely has to go up over time. Thats how you cause new adaptions. Increasing volume or frequency is one way to increase the workload, just as increasing the intensity (weights) is. The intensity is just one of the variables, not the only.

Simply saying "not making progress" equals overtraining is directly false. That, if anything, is the old bodybuilding myth that keeps people from making progress. Of course, you should not train too much in a session a la a typical arm-day (that is not what I am referring to), but rather the fact that people are so afraid of not making progress that they never allow themselves to get weaker for a period of time. They do not seem to understand that you in many instances need to be weaker for a while (in the short perspective) to get stronger (in the long perspective).

That's just one of the reasons people stay on their 3/4/5 splits or whatever, and are afraid to squat again when they still have doms. You don't get anything extra from being fresh and setting PRs every single session.

Well if your recovery is impaired from not enough sleep or food, and you train too much for that low recovery capacity, you are overtraining.

We are back to semantics

I guess I should define undertraining: not making full use of your maximum recovery capacity

But I can see what you are getting at with the idea of temporary regression in performance sometimes being necessary. I honestly was grinding myself into the ground slowly going backwards for months training 4 times a week
post #52453 of 57266
Quote:
Originally Posted by skeen7908 View Post


Well if your recovery is impaired from not enough sleep or food, and you train too much for that low recovery capacity, you are overtraining.

We are back to semantics

No, over time you will adapt to the workload, even with too little food or sleep (to certain extent, of course). With good sleep and nutrition, that adaption will be faster,

 

Your recovery ability or workload capacity is by no means fixed. It is not solely dependent on genetics or whatever.

 

You can improve it with proper programming.

post #52454 of 57266
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by conceptionist View Post

You don't get anything extra from being fresh and setting PRs every single session.

+1 kappa
post #52455 of 57266
Quote:
Originally Posted by Szeph el raton View Post

Despite skeen's comment bein quite direct, he's spot on. You're somewhere between 20 and 25% bodyfat. From my point of view I wouldn't care the least what I lift if it's not for some exact athletic goal of contest or whatever, there simply no reason to be fat if it's not to score high in a contest where the additional mass helps you get some more strength. I'd go on a cut until you're around 15% and then you could consider again to go for the 1000 lbs goal or whatever, the point right now is clearly not asthetic. Except for the arms it looks DYEL.

I'm probably around 15% bf now and I'm 5'9" at 159 lbs and sorry, but you don't look like you'd snap me like a twig.

I think there's some major mental problems that many of us here have that have been mentioned here in the past:
- Bulking to get big but never cutting to get aesthetically pleasing
- Looking at figures for lifts when you don't even compete (aesthetics = mirror != numbers)
- Blatant underestimation of bodyfat (oh hey, I can see my first abs in perfect lighting, I must be at 10%)
- Being believers in the Church of Supps (I'm guilty of this one too because there's nothing like nuking your brain with 400mg of coffein in a PWO)
The list could go on with system jumping, bro science, etc.

To be fair he is cutting soon

I think a lot of people are just ashamed to admit they want to be aesthetic, so they try and pretend to focus on strength. Rippletits stigma has a super far reach. Once I admitted to myself I wanted to be aesthetic and tailored my program and diet to that things got a lot easier and more satisfying.
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