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Random health and exercise thoughts - Page 3458

post #51856 of 57263
Quote:
Originally Posted by barrelntrigger View Post
 


Hmmm, just thinking about making a deadlift platform with 2 pieces of 4x6 plywood and putting those horse stall mats on top. Been thinking about putting the lat pull down pulleys on the cage. After all that, the setup would be complete. I'm starting 5/3/1 routine just on my deadlift. I think the bench and squat lacks volume just once a week. But the program is suppose to put 100 lbs on the dl in a year for an intermediate lifter. I've been benching twice a week and I'm making gains slowly. Just benched 285 double last night. Good luck on the house, mate! We looked at over 100 houses within 2 years and put in a bunch of offers before getting our current one. Keep us updated. 

 

Just jump on Sheiko instead. Imo its vastly superior 5/3/1 in every way if strength is your goal. I know a couple of "intermediate" powerlifters who have run both and they all favor Sheiko.

The whole system is built so you'll have programs you can follow for years. Can't say that with 5/3/1. You need to manage the block periodization and long term volume and intensity increases yourself when running that.

post #51857 of 57263
The entire point of 5/3/1 is that you follow it for years. That's esetbially the reason Wendler made it - consistent, long term progression (albeit slow).

I'm not saying it's amazing and I've never run it, and don't intend to, but saying his system isn't built to be in place for years is not accurate. He has said that it is anti program add but the different templates can be used in a periodisation manner or you can alternate standard 531 with BBB for example to satisfy your ads but not screw with the progression.
Edited by OccultaVexillum - 3/20/15 at 2:56pm
post #51858 of 57263
@conceptionist can you tell me more about your "hit every lift every day" program

Not gonna run it on my cut obviously but if I have a home gym I should be able to do a little something every day
post #51859 of 57263
Quote:
Originally Posted by OccultaVexillum View Post

The entire point of 5/3/1 is that you follow it for years. That's esetbially the reason Wendler made it - consistent, long term progression (albeit slow).

I'm not saying it's amazing and I've never run it, and don't intend to, but saying his system isn't built to be in place for years is not accurate. He has said that it is anti program add but the different templates can be used in a periodisation manner or you can alternate standard 531 with BBB for example to satisfy your ads but not screw with the progression.

 

Anyone who knows anything about how real sports training is carried out knows that you get better results with block periodization than simple linear progression years on end.

You can just look at what goes on behind the Sheiko program (the statistics and calculations, lifetime coaching experience of top international weightlifters and powerlifters) and then compare that to 5/3/1, which in essence is another bodybuilding 4-split dressed up as a powerlifting program.

post #51860 of 57263
I'm not a 531 champion, I just don't agree that it has no long term application.
post #51861 of 57263
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cool The Kid View Post

@conceptionist can you tell me more about your "hit every lift every day" program

Not gonna run it on my cut obviously but if I have a home gym I should be able to do a little something every day

 

Basically it is built on the following principles:

- Train often (5x a week for me)

- Hit each lift every session (aside from one session with no deadlifts)

- Many variations of the powerlifts. From what I know, this is done to keep progressing, not develop overuse injuries when training so frequently, and since some variations target specific muscles more than others. For instance if you cave forward in a low bar competition squat, I would use more front squats and high bar squats as variations to get quad strength to rise straight up from the hole.

- Generally high volume (more the farther out from training) but with many sets of low reps rather than few reps of high sets in the powerlifts. 

- Almost never to failure. Squats, benches and deadlifts are done most in sets of 2-4 reps, with occasional 5's, with somewhere between 2-4 reps left every set. Heavier in meet prep.

- The few lifts that are done to failure are often isolation (such as leg extensions) or hypertrophy-oriented versions of the compounds (such as squats with blood flow restricted legs for sets of 20). The sets to failure come every once in a while (say every 4th week) to sort of "shock" the body. May be more often further out from a meet,

- The few accessory movements (that are not variations of squat, bench, or deadlift) are always rather light and higher reps (3-5 sets of 6-12) and used sparingly. For instance I only do 3 rowing movements per week, but maybe 6 different deadlifts. Abs, low back and hips/glutes are part of warm up every session.

- Weights are generally light, or at least lighter than in many other powerlifting programs. This is because the frequency is much higher than the standard and since the total volume over a given time period is also higher.

post #51862 of 57263
Quote:
Originally Posted by OccultaVexillum View Post

I'm not a 531 champion, I just don't agree that it has no long term application.

 

It is not a bad program and it will work (as will anything that is consistent and somewhat sound).

It is just very simple, and imo is built on some principles that I don't think are the best. 

- Frequency is too low. Just about every natural lifter gets better results with at least 2-3x frequency per lift and muscle group per week than once after they have adapted to it. 

- Too much focus on accessory work and bodybuilding movements for those who want to get strong in the compounds.

- Too light generally, and when it gets heavy it is max reps, which is done rather frequently. Near failure training usually leads to worse technique and unnecessary psych-up and injury risk in training. A single all out max rep set is not needed for strength not size, but it is one of the cornerstones of his program. It is better imo to do more sets of lower reps to reach the same total reps at the same weight.

 

TL;DR.

It is not bad. There are just better programs out there.

post #51863 of 57263
Quote:
Originally Posted by conceptionist View Post

Basically it is built on the following principles:
- Train often (5x a week for me)
- Hit each lift every session (aside from one session with no deadlifts)
- Many variations of the powerlifts. From what I know, this is done to keep progressing, not develop overuse injuries when training so frequently, and since some variations target specific muscles more than others. For instance if you cave forward in a low bar competition squat, I would use more front squats and high bar squats as variations to get quad strength to rise straight up from the hole.
- Generally high volume (more the farther out from training) but with many sets of low reps rather than few reps of high sets in the powerlifts. 
- Almost never to failure. Squats, benches and deadlifts are done most in sets of 2-4 reps, with occasional 5's, with somewhere between 2-4 reps left every set. Heavier in meet prep.
- The few lifts that are done to failure are often isolation (such as leg extensions) or hypertrophy-oriented versions of the compounds (such as squats with blood flow restricted legs for sets of 20). The sets to failure come every once in a while (say every 4th week) to sort of "shock" the body. May be more often further out from a meet,
- The few accessory movements (that are not variations of squat, bench, or deadlift) are always rather light and higher reps (3-5 sets of 6-12) and used sparingly. For instance I only do 3 rowing movements per week, but maybe 6 different deadlifts. Abs, low back and hips/glutes are part of warm up every session.
- Weights are generally light, or at least lighter than in many other powerlifting programs. This is because the frequency is much higher than the standard and since the total volume over a given time period is also higher.
I am just trying to think how to apply these principles to a purely aesthetic/hypertrophy focused program. I'm not sure it's possible to have something like a 5-7 day full body bodybuilding split, but if it is it would yield max gains. Lot of respectable folks talking about the Bulgarian method and other shit. I'm feeling like if I spread my regular bulking volume out evenly over the week on a daily basis I may be OK.
post #51864 of 57263

My training schedule is total shit right now and will probably not get better till I return from london on the 3rd. Yolo!

Hoping to get 2-3 sessions in over the weekend at home... since the cut/recomp has been going super well. Only ended up working out monday this week. Oy.

post #51865 of 57263
It's a sad, inverse relationship. The more aesthetic you get in your workout clothes, the less so in regular clothing.
post #51866 of 57263
Thread Starter 


Strong
post #51867 of 57263
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cool The Kid View Post


FFFFFFFF 100 houses? How many ones did you go into contract on? We have looked at maybe 6-7 houses and have been in contract twice. We did offer what they were asking for this house though.

Once shit is all together I will probably make a YT video.

We've only gone into contract for one house and that was the house we ended up buying. But we've put in quite a few offers. Bro, IMO, 6-7 houses are nearly not enough for you to make a decision. But I've read the inventory is quite low for the past few seasons. So, there are far less choices out there. I was going through all the fliers after going to contract, I had to throw out a few fat stacks of them. We went with 4 agents and looked at least 100 houses within a 2 year period. When we were buying, it was crazy! It was a seller's market all day. We end up beating out an all cash offer because we know people who know other people. Good look, bro! This is prolly the biggest decision of your lives! :fonz:

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by OccultaVexillum View Post

The entire point of 5/3/1 is that you follow it for years. That's esetbially the reason Wendler made it - consistent, long term progression (albeit slow).

I'm not saying it's amazing and I've never run it, and don't intend to, but saying his system isn't built to be in place for years is not accurate. He has said that it is anti program add but the different templates can be used in a periodisation manner or you can alternate standard 531 with BBB for example to satisfy your ads but not screw with the progression.

The only reason I'm trying it out is because the program is simple and easy to understand. I even found a few calculators for it. I'm only following the program for deadlifts. I'm doing the Boring But Big with 5 extra working sets set up around 60-80% of 1RM. I'm gonna give it a go for a few cycles to see how much gains I can make. 

post #51868 of 57263
Is there any reason i have to do a movement like seated db military? Ie can i hit the muscles enough doing bench work and maybe going way lighter?

My back is still acting up a little and i think think is one movement i could stand to go a bit easy on. Just trying to figure out what else i can realistically do.
post #51869 of 57263
Had this conversation with my mother yesterday.

H: You should avoid getting any bigger, as you don't look like someone working in your field (property development).
M: So...., what you are saying is, that I don't look like a potbellied, balding man, twice my age, thanks.
H: plain.gif
post #51870 of 57263
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cool The Kid View Post


I am just trying to think how to apply these principles to a purely aesthetic/hypertrophy focused program. I'm not sure it's possible to have something like a 5-7 day full body bodybuilding split, but if it is it would yield max gains. Lot of respectable folks talking about the Bulgarian method and other shit. I'm feeling like if I spread my regular bulking volume out evenly over the week on a daily basis I may be OK.

Oh, I misunderstand what info you wanted.

Long explanation (Click to show)

Each session start with 2-3 sets of abs, 2-3 sets of low bak and sometimes 2-3 sets for glutes/hips or rear delts.

Each session has 1 or 2 slots for a squat, bench or deadlift variation. These movements are done in that order. 

After squatting, benching and deadlifting, there's usually 2-3 pure bodybuilding accessory movements for 3-5 sets of 6-12 reps.

 

I think the program can be targeted towards general hypertrophy if you just change out the powerlift variations in the slots to more hypertrophy-oriented lifts.

 

I would start with 4x a week, doing 1-2 squat variation per session, 1-2 pressing variations, and 1-2 deadlift/lat movements per session + abs, arms and whatever else accessories you need.

 

To give an example for a more hypertrophy oriented version:

 

Squats:

slot 1 = high bar squats (heavy),

slot 2 = front squats (for reps),

slot 3 = pause squats (many sets of low reps),

slot 4 = tempo squats (few reps) (3sec up, 3 sec down, no pause b/w reps),

 

Presses:

slot 1 = Bench press (heavy),

slot 2 = incline bench press (for reps),

slot 3 = DB presses (high volume, high reps and many sets)

slot 4 = military press (for volume)

 

Lats and deadlifts:

slot 1 = conventional deadlifts (heavy),

slot 2 = romanian deadlifts (for reps),

slot 3 = pull ups (for volume),

slot 4 = horisontal/vertical lat row (for volume)

 

Quick sample routine:

 

Day 1:

abs, low back, glutes

Squat slot 1

Press slot 2

Lat/dead slot 3

Lunges

Flyes

Biceps

 

Day 2:

abs, low back, rear delts

Squat slot 2

Press slot 3

Lat/dead slot 4

Hamstring curls

Cable rows

Triceps

 

Day 3: 

abs, low back, glutes

Squat slot 3

Press slot 4

Lat/dead slot 1

Incline db press

Shrugs superset DB shoulder raise

Biceps

 

Day 4:

abs, low back, rear delts

Squat slot 4

Press slot 1

Lat/dead slot 2

Leg extensions

V-bar rows

Triceps

 

Of course, you'll have to expertiment with the variations and accessories so you find a good combination for each session. 

It is key though that when you bench heavy, you squat lighter, and when one is for high reps, the other is lowish reps. That's why I didn't put every slot 1 in the same day, for instance.

 

Bulgarian method is best for weightlifting. It involves daily maxing and general work above 90% of 1RM. That super high intensity and frequency works well in weightlifting since the weights are lower and the lifts have no negative phase (which is more demanding for recovery than the lifts' positive phase).

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