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Random health and exercise thoughts - Page 3081

post #46201 of 47701
Quote:
Originally Posted by Find Finn View Post


It's not an issue for people who are use to this kind of training and/or know how to listen to their body.

I sometimes do CF for cardio as I tend to skip it, if I don't have someone screaming in my head and I have never had any issue, as I just stop if my body tells me to.

 

That's exactly my point. The CF mentality is to PUSH THROUGH AND BREAK BOUNDARIES, but that's the worst way to go about it.


And yes, being new to a sport means you jump in slowly over time. Just because you can lift something heavy doesn't mean you should do it as fast as you and as many times as you can.

There's something to be said about having people new to any sport go easy for a bit to learn things before jumping in and getting over their heads.

I think crossfitters do too much too fast too soon.

post #46202 of 47701
I would guess that sedentary people who start running have a high frequency of injuries, as well, just from personal observation.
post #46203 of 47701
some @fit coaches actually know how to coach weightlifting and how to write programs. I think that makes a shitload of difference in the trainees' wellbeing. too bad the most internet prominent ones fail either or both of these criteria.
post #46204 of 47701
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lagrangian View Post

some @fit coaches actually know how to coach weightlifting and how to write programs. I think that makes a shitload of difference in the trainees' wellbeing. too bad the most internet prominent ones fail either or both of these criteria.

Thats my biggest gripe... you have a bunch of people who no nothing about fitness jumping into a routine that is dependent on quality coaching with no kind of accreditation required for that coaching

The marketing angle of it is brilliant though. I met a couple down here that met at Crossfit. I have been considering checking it out just for the networking/social aspect
post #46205 of 47701
The social part is one of the things I like about cf gyms, everyone chats with each other, no headphones and if you ask for a spot 5 people will gladly drop what they doing to spot you, also cute girls in little clothing.
post #46206 of 47701
Quote:
Originally Posted by Find Finn View Post


It's not an issue for people who are use to this kind of training and/or know how to listen to their body.

I sometimes do CF for cardio as I tend to skip it, if I don't have someone screaming in my head and I have never had any issue, as I just stop if my body tells me to.

But we aren't talking about people who know what they're doing. And saying you do CF as cardio means you are just doing metcons, which is what crossfit wods essentially are (but with illogical exercise selection).

I don't really have an issue with CF, it's nothing new. It's just a "new" label on old methods. But I think a beginners class should be limited enough that coaches can properly monitor and "coach" the trainees. And they should have to pass a certain level in order to move on to bigger classes and be able to train by themselves.

You can say the same for any dumbass who walks in to a gym and starts deadlifting with round backs or quater squatting or whatever. I just feel its more prevalent in CF because of the "timed" manner and because of the competitive nature of trying to outdo each other.

post #46207 of 47701
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cool The Kid View Post

Thats my biggest gripe... you have a bunch of people who no nothing about fitness jumping into a routine that is dependent on quality coaching with no kind of accreditation required for that coaching

They just released new coaching standards that might help this, but with the zillions of facilities out there already, who knows how much good it will do.

I hate the language they use. "Early on, we recognized the demand from the community for more—particularly from trainers wanting to apply the principle of virtuosity to their craft."

WTF is "the principle of virtuosity" and how does it apply to exercise?
post #46208 of 47701
in b4 Fuji rants on training not being a near-death 6th dimension fulfilling life changing experience foo.gif
post #46209 of 47701
I work out at a Golds Gym now, comes free with rent and I'm trying to safe so I figured why not. First workout today and already saw tons of funny shit.
post #46210 of 47701
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lagrangian View Post


what you actually mean here is does the chinese way of teaching their athletes how to squat differ from how you should [back] squat, right?

the previous me answer would have been just to say yes and hit send, but I'm trying to be a nice guy lol8[1].gif

obviously the front squat and the back squat can differ quite a lot, depending on how you back squat, i.e. a low-bar squat and the positions that you need there are almost the exact opposites of a front squat. but let's say you want to squat high bar, and in that case the front squat isn't that much different from the BS - in both you're sitting down between your heels, keeping as upright a torso as you can manage. in the FS this is even more imperative as if your torso starts to cave you'll lose the bar out front.

about the knees in philosophy - there's a rather huge difference in what Theo is saying in the article you posted and knees actually caving in in a squat. I definitely would not recommend the latter.

Thanks for being a nice guy! :D

post #46211 of 47701
Quote:
Originally Posted by OccultaVexillum View Post

But we aren't talking about people who know what they're doing. And saying you do CF as cardio means you are just doing metcons, which is what crossfit wods essentially are (but with illogical exercise selection).
I don't really have an issue with CF, it's nothing new. It's just a "new" label on old methods. But I think a beginners class should be limited enough that coaches can properly monitor and "coach" the trainees. And they should have to pass a certain level in order to move on to bigger classes and be able to train by themselves.
You can say the same for any dumbass who walks in to a gym and starts deadlifting with round backs or quater squatting or whatever. I just feel its more prevalent in CF because of the "timed" manner and because of the competitive nature of trying to outdo each other.

I know, but cf tends to have a stigma attached to it, where everyone is an idiot and knows nothing (I'm not saying you are saying it) which isn't true.

The timed wod parts is actually a surprisingly small part of the hour a class takes.
10-15 warm up
10-20 heavy low intensity
10-20 wod
And if there's anything left over static/stretching.

I know it's basically what the military/pro sports have been doing for decades, but there's a reason why they still do it.

Most places (at least around here) recommended you do a couple months of intro before you move up, but most classes are scaled, so if you can't lift heavy or have been tech, you can scale down or do something else.

I haven't seen that in a regular gym, you can just run wild there, which why I think a lot of people get very little done and have very little progress.

The current gym I train at doesn't have the timed aspect, no board with the best times of the day or nothing, which compared to other places I've trained leads to less injuries and people focusing on them self and not the time.
post #46212 of 47701
My goal is to highbar 315. I fuckin suck at highbar
post #46213 of 47701
Quote:
Originally Posted by Coldsnap View Post

My goal is to highbar 315. I fuckin suck at highbar


Bro, I've seen you crank out on the low bar and I was like DAAYYYMMMMMNNNN! I know that on the high bar, you mainly use your quads and on the low bar, you engage more of your hammies and glues. Does that mean your quads are under developed and your hammies and glues are over developed? 

post #46214 of 47701
It just means he's weaker on high bar and need to get stronger, don't hate foo.gif
post #46215 of 47701
Quote:
Originally Posted by barrelntrigger View Post
 


Bro, I've seen you crank out on the low bar and I was like DAAYYYMMMMMNNNN! I know that on the high bar, you mainly use your quads and on the low bar, you engage more of your hammies and glues. Does that mean your quads are under developed and your hammies and glues are over developed? 

 

Stop over analyzing everyyyyythingggg

Quote:
Originally Posted by virus646 View Post

It just means he's weaker on high bar and need to get stronger, don't hate foo.gif

 

Sometimes the answer is just 'do more of it'.

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