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Random health and exercise thoughts - Page 3080

post #46186 of 57263
I'm hoping they both do.

♪ We found love in a hopeless place ♪
post #46187 of 57263
Quote:
Originally Posted by ridethecliche View Post

Your chances of rupturing a thoracic disc are minimal. We see that injury so fucking rarely. See more burst fractures if anything. Thoracic spine is for stability not motion. It's relatively immobile. Cervical and lumbar spine serve the function of mobility.

I'll let Teekay talk more about that if he wants.

I unfortunately don't have the time to do a proper literature review but I'll say in my (albeit limited) experience, I haven't seen anyone with a FUBAR'd thoracic spine as a result of weightlifting. Usually it's cervical spine. Sometimes it's lumbar spine but even that's pretty uncommon unless they have some sort of predisposition to it. More commonly I'm seeing things like sciatica from a tight piriformis and then just the general overuse syndromes(tennis elbow, etc.). And this is in a patient population that's pretty swole(military). Many of the chief complaints are "Heya doc I used to be able to bench 385 now I can only get 345 and it hurts like hell" kinda stuff.
post #46188 of 57263
Also fml thank god only one more week of this:

jDASanx.png
post #46189 of 57263
Quote:
Originally Posted by TeeKay View Post

I unfortunately don't have the time to do a proper literature review but I'll say in my (albeit limited) experience, I haven't seen anyone with a FUBAR'd thoracic spine as a result of weightlifting. Usually it's cervical spine. Sometimes it's lumbar spine but even that's pretty uncommon unless they have some sort of predisposition to it. More commonly I'm seeing things like sciatica from a tight piriformis and then just the general overuse syndromes(tennis elbow, etc.). And this is in a patient population that's pretty swole(military). Many of the chief complaints are "Heya doc I used to be able to bench 385 now I can only get 345 and it hurts like hell" kinda stuff.

I have a lot of second hand anecdotal evidence from a sports med fellow and attending to be that lifters and crossfit peeps (more the latter) get lumbar injuries from lifting.

Not sure what you mean by predisposition. Surgery genetics and bad discs?
post #46190 of 57263
Quote:
Originally Posted by ridethecliche View Post

I have a lot of second hand anecdotal evidence from a sports med fellow and attending to be that lifters and crossfit peeps (more the latter) get lumbar injuries from lifting.

Not sure what you mean by predisposition. Surgery genetics and bad discs?

Pretty much -- things like existing lumbar stenosis, possessing certain genes that lead to a weak intervertebral disk, or previous injuries.

TBH the whole belief that everyone who touches a weight is at serious risk of a lumbar disc herniation seems unwarranted to me. That's typically a process that happens in middle-aged people due to age-related changes in the disc. While it certainly can happen from improper lifting, it's not something we routinely see.

Also I went ahead and looked it up...thoracid disk herniations make up less than 1% of all surgical herniated disk cases.
post #46191 of 57263
Yeah that's in line with what I think the spine surgery I do research at sees.
post #46192 of 57263

I was doing some reading on squat techniques and stumbled on this blog. I have a tendency to push my knees inward just a little bit when squating especially under heavy load. 

 

http://lifthard.com/why-we-do-not-believe-in-knees-pushed-out-when-squatting/

 

Are the techniques different between clean and jerk and back squats? Any inputs?

 

Also, found this blog talking about the debate whether knees should be in or out.

 

http://breakingmuscle.com/mobility-recovery/moderating-the-knees-in-versus-knees-out-squat-debate

 

Example, olympic style weight lifting with knees in.

 

 


Edited by barrelntrigger - 7/17/14 at 2:27am
post #46193 of 57263
Look at Dan Green squatting:
From what I've read and from my personal experience, I think that it's fine at the bottom of the squat. You use more quad that way and stay more explosive.

You can also see it on wider stance squatter, see Chris Duffin:
post #46194 of 57263
Quote:
Originally Posted by ridethecliche View Post

I have a lot of second hand anecdotal evidence from a sports med fellow and attending to be that lifters and crossfit peeps (more the latter) get lumbar injuries from lifting.

Not sure what you mean by predisposition. Surgery genetics and bad discs?

Other than obvious cross fit jokes, why would that population have more frequent spinal injuries?
post #46195 of 57263
Quote:
Originally Posted by msg View Post


Other than obvious cross fit jokes, why would that population have more frequent spinal injuries?

 

I think part of the issue is that cross fit people tend to not know how to listen to their bodies and don't take time off to recover from injuries. It's like a false machismo and bravado where people just work through things.


The other thing is that the goal is to do things fast and heavy which is where technique goes to shit. People push PR's so much in that culture that people push themselves over the edge having no idea what limits they should impose.


Take a bunch of people that sit at work all day that suddenly get hit with a fitness craze and want to go crazy with it. You have to ease into it or you get injured.

post #46196 of 57263
I think you are on to something with the noob thing, as CF has "opened up" free weight/oly/power lifting training to more people, who either never worked out before or have been machine people before.

I workout at a CF gym and I often see new people in the intro classes do stuff that is bound to go wrong, but 99% of the time the trainer or other people will correct them, I actually saw two guys DL 240lbs with a back more arched than Drake the other day, it was painful.
post #46197 of 57263

Pretty much.

-Ineffective coaching (or too many clients in a class for coaches to give adequate time and attention to each individual)

combined with

-Technically complex (relatively) movements done in a fatigued state

-The goal of speed and beating other peoples "times" exacerbates the issue of good form

-overuse + shit recovery

post #46198 of 57263
Quote:
Originally Posted by barrelntrigger View Post

Are the techniques different between clean and jerk and back squats? Any inputs?

what you actually mean here is does the chinese way of teaching their athletes how to squat differ from how you should [back] squat, right?

the previous me answer would have been just to say yes and hit send, but I'm trying to be a nice guy lol8[1].gif

obviously the front squat and the back squat can differ quite a lot, depending on how you back squat, i.e. a low-bar squat and the positions that you need there are almost the exact opposites of a front squat. but let's say you want to squat high bar, and in that case the front squat isn't that much different from the BS - in both you're sitting down between your heels, keeping as upright a torso as you can manage. in the FS this is even more imperative as if your torso starts to cave you'll lose the bar out front.

about the knees in philosophy - there's a rather huge difference in what Theo is saying in the article you posted and knees actually caving in in a squat. I definitely would not recommend the latter.
post #46199 of 57263
Quote:
Originally Posted by OccultaVexillum View Post

Pretty much.
-Ineffective coaching (or too many clients in a class for coaches to give adequate time and attention to each individual)
combined with
-Technically complex (relatively) movements done in a fatigued state
-The goal of speed and beating other peoples "times" exacerbates the issue of good form
-overuse + shit recovery

It's not an issue for people who are use to this kind of training and/or know how to listen to their body.

I sometimes do CF for cardio as I tend to skip it, if I don't have someone screaming in my head and I have never had any issue, as I just stop if my body tells me to.
post #46200 of 57263
Quote:
Originally Posted by Find Finn View Post


It's not an issue for people who are use to this kind of training and/or know how to listen to their body.

I sometimes do CF for cardio as I tend to skip it, if I don't have someone screaming in my head and I have never had any issue, as I just stop if my body tells me to.

 

That's exactly my point. The CF mentality is to PUSH THROUGH AND BREAK BOUNDARIES, but that's the worst way to go about it.


And yes, being new to a sport means you jump in slowly over time. Just because you can lift something heavy doesn't mean you should do it as fast as you and as many times as you can.

There's something to be said about having people new to any sport go easy for a bit to learn things before jumping in and getting over their heads.

I think crossfitters do too much too fast too soon.

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