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Snow Advice

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 
DC is the first snow i have seen in twenty years , having lived in Oz. Asia and CA.
Aside from the obvious (shovel, windshield scraper) what else do I need?
Is there a specific de-icing solution for Cars?
Any recommendations for good walking boots (hiking 5 blocks to the Supermarket only) - that are not too Fugly and will keep me dry.

Thanks
post #2 of 16
A pair of these -



One of these -



And several of these -

post #3 of 16
I hope you are kidding about a 5 mile trek to the supermarket. And for the first snow you have seen in 20 years, you are making up for lost time. Im in NY and its already horrific out there. - turn the windshield wipers on your car out (probably too late for that now) - salt for the driveway (if you have pets get the natural kind) - a neatly folded $20 bill for the boys who will knock on your door asking to shovel your driveway (best money you will ever spend) - jack daniels
post #4 of 16
I've never heard of de-icing solutions for cars but at least make sure your windshield washer fluid has a lower freezing point than water or else you're screwed. Even worse is those drivers who top up the fluid reservoir with water.

Be sure to top it up regularly as it is a life saver when driving.

Other driving tips:
- give your self extra time to drive - in other words leave earlier than usual
- keep a greater distance back behind cars in front of you
- break earlier than usual
- snow tires? (I'm not sure if this is possible or even worth it in your case)
- have an ice pick / snow brush handy in the car

Boots? I like the Filson Highlanders but have no experience with them yet.

Obviously dress warm and wear plenty of layers (something that a lot of people who have experience dealing with winter still haven't figured out yet).

I live in Canada so I consider myself an expert.
post #5 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpooPoker View Post
I hope you are kidding about a 5 mile trek to the supermarket. - a neatly folded $20 bill for the boys who will knock on your door asking to shovel your driveway (best money you will ever spend) - jack daniels
Also, he's going 5 blocks, not 5 miles. No need for one of these for only 5 blocks. Make sure you know where the windshield-washer fluid nozzles are on your car; then clear the snow off of them. They don't work well when covered in snow They make special de-icer windshield fluid, but the normal stuff is probably fine for low 30s, high 20s. Next time you buy some, get the special stuff for lower temps. When I lived where it snowed, I used an ice scraper/brush like this. Works waaaay better than the small ones, and is still pretty cheap. Don't forget to brush the snow off your headlights and taillights, drive slower than normal, and brake waaaaaaaay earlier than you normally would.
post #6 of 16
1. For your car, make sure you get the winter-grade windshield washer fluid. The all-year round or summer version might freeze. Invest in a good, sturdy scraper that has a scraper blade on one end, and a squeegee/brush combo on the other end. 2. Waterproof boots, e.g. something with Gore-Tex and Vibram outsole. I have a pair of Vasque boots with Gore-Tex and Vibram that I bring out for the worst of winter storms. My feet never got wet and I could walk around in them all day. 3. Good, thick wool socks. There's no substitute. 4. Waterproof gloves. 5. Waterproof jacket, preferably insulated and has a hood.
post #7 of 16
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by DarkNWorn View Post
1. For your car, make sure you get the winter-grade windshield washer fluid. The all-year round or summer version might freeze. Invest in a good, sturdy scraper that has a scraper blade on one end, and a squeegee/brush combo on the other end.

2. Waterproof boots, e.g. something with Gore-Tex and Vibram outsole. I have a pair of Vasque boots with Gore-Tex and Vibram that I bring out for the worst of winter storms. My feet never got wet and I could walk around in them all day.

3. Good, thick wool socks. There's no substitute.

4. Waterproof gloves.

5. Waterproof jacket, preferably insulated and has a hood.

Excellent advice - thanks guys.
Yes - 5 blocks & not 5 miles...
post #8 of 16
you are in DC mang...leave your car where it is (assuming it's safe) and take cabs/the Metro until it thaws. for a 5 block walk you should be fine if you dress like the other guys have said.
post #9 of 16
Use it as an excuse to pop over to skyvalet and order up a pair of shannons with medway or ridgeway soles.

If you do it, I'll do a matching grant/gift sort of thing and order up a pair for me as well.

So your excuse becomes mine...
post #10 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by HRoi View Post
you are in DC mang...leave your car where it is (assuming it's safe) and take cabs/the Metro until it thaws. for a 5 block walk you should be fine if you dress like the other guys have said.
+1. I'd use public transportation or a cab. I tend to do fine driving in snow but it's the other drivers that concern me.
post #11 of 16
post #12 of 16
a lot of patience... u don't want to slip on black ice on your way to work
post #13 of 16
i have not seen snow many years, you are so lucky. you may ware the down coat
post #14 of 16
Some more good advice about driving:

Leave plenty of space (a car length is a good starting point) between you and the car in front of you at a stop light. Even more space on a hill.

I've seen and been involved in accidents where a chain reaction occurs because some jackass hits the last car in a line at the light and then 5 cars get smashed as a result.

Also, sometimes cars don't get traction and start to slide back down hills. It can happen suddenly. If you give them some space, it is less likely to be a problem.

If you are going to slide through a stop sign or stop light, blink your lights and honk your horn a lot so at least other people know it is happening.
post #15 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Milhouse View Post
If you are going to slide through a stop sign or stop light, blink your lights and honk your horn a lot so at least other people know it is happening.

Prepare for this eventuality if you own a rwd BMW and live near a hill.
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