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Flat feet in dress shoes - Page 2

post #16 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by jjgold
I have flat feet. If I order the orthoheel does that mean that I have to buy all new shoes? I mean will the product make my current shoes to tight? Or will they fit right into my AE and still permit the shoe to fit the same?


It depends on the height of the arch of the shoe and your foot. Mostly you will manage to get the Orthaheel Regular into your shoes if they are of average fit. I've been pleasantly surprised at how I've managed to wear them with some quite close fitting shoes. Still one or two particularly tight fitting shoes with lowish arches only manage to take the Slimfit, which will still partly correct the excessive pronation that causes most flat feet.
post #17 of 27
Okay, just ordered a pair. I'm looking forward to trying them out. Thanks for the tip.

By the way, I appreciate their very reasonable shipping charges.
post #18 of 27
Another possibility is Tacco leather arch supports. They don't correct for pronation, but they do fit in dress shoes without much difficulty. I buy them at the shoe repair shop.
post #19 of 27
I got my Orthaheel in the mail today, which shows fast shipping (and at under $2 for 1st class). I have the orthotics in now, and while it will take some time to get used to the pressure on my (usually non-existent) arch, it really does do a remarkable job at correcting my pronation. My feet are sitting up straight without the usual gap I have at the exterior heel and side. In the two pairs I've tried it in I've not noticed any negative issue with fit. In fact, I'm pretty sure the shoes fit better since my foot is doing what it should do in them.

So far so good. Thanks for the recommendation, Sator!
post #20 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by AlanC
I got my Orthaheel in the mail today, which shows fast shipping (and at under $2 for 1st class). I have the orthotics in now, and while it will take some time to get used to the pressure on my (usually non-existent) arch, it really does do a remarkable job at correcting my pronation. My feet are sitting up straight without the usual gap I have at the exterior heel and side. In the two pairs I've tried it in I've not noticed any negative issue with fit. In fact, I'm pretty sure the shoes fit better since my foot is doing what it should do in them.

So far so good. Thanks for the recommendation, Sator!

Fantastic! I'm really glad you found them as good as I did. I had the same issue too where it took me about 2 days to get used the extra arch support. It actually says that on the packaging as well. I personally liked the feeling which was like a rather strong massage to the arch. Now I barely notice they are there.
post #21 of 27
This thread is more than a year old. I am reviving it to ask the posters if they continue to wear (and would continue to endorse) these orthaheel products. Flat feet do not cause me heel pain, knee pain, back pain, or any such significant discomfort, perhaps because I've never carried extra weight & have always been very to somewhat trim. The flat feet, however, make it difficult for me to fit shoes. The ball of my foot is more forward, of course, so that while the Brannock device suggests a 10 shoe for my foot length, it suggests an 11 to fit the ball of my foot. And, also because of the flat feet, I need a regular width or I uncomfortably crowd my smallest toe. Yet the heel of the foot would fit better in a narrow. So I generally wear a 10.5D with tongue pads and have long been living with a variety of fits. And I get the creases on the inside of my foot as the OP describes. Most of my shoes are reasonably comfortable, especially when worn with thicker socks, but few are very comfortable. I'm considering this Orthaheel product - the regular for starters, I suppose - in the hope that it will make my foot an easier fit. Is this wise? I have no pain or discomfort to relieve--just the annoyance of not-so-well-fitting shoes and strange creasing. I also wonder to what degree these inserts would change my size. Mainly I need to fill the space about the heel, and mainly I need to fill more space between the top of the foot and the laces. I'd be willing to move up or down a half-size (and buy all new shoes) if this insert would give me a better fit at the new size. I wonder if long-time users of this orthaheel could comment on the extent to which it corrected their fit and/or altered their size.
post #22 of 27
Everybody's feet and shoe fit are going to be different, so it will be impossible to tell you exactly what is going to happen for you. It seems that the people here who have described the product say that it a) has greatly helped and b) only minimally affected the fit and sizing of their shoes. I share the same sentiments. The product costs barely $25, and people have described how well it works. Just take the plunge and see for yourself whether the product will do for you what you want it to do.
post #23 of 27
Fair enough, zbromer. You're right, there's no reason to fret about it.

But I do wonder if anyone's enthusiasm for the product has diminished since this conversation a year ago.
post #24 of 27
Start here. They have other products, including metatarsal pads, but from your description, this is what you want. If you know your needs well, you can create the effect of custom orthotics by putting the right pads in the right places directly into your shoe. It is not, however, as easy as it sounds.
post #25 of 27
Thanks dopey. I think you're right ... I will order some of those pads and see what I can do.
post #26 of 27
I have flat wide feet too! No pain of any sort but I do have a nice inner crease (very small) on my shoes.
post #27 of 27
Both Orthaheel and Hapad, Inc., have super-quick shipping. Hapad also delivers a catalog and "patient's guide" with helpful information. And they look like a good source for tongue pads or tongue cushions, a product that I occasionally get for free at a local shoe store but had trouble finding on my own through the internet. I wore the Orthaheel for four or five hours yesterday. The first impression was strange, but not uncomfortable. Absolutely my shoes fit better with this product. I felt an inch taller and, popinjay that I am, my first thought was for the break of my pants. The trousers were OK of course. Today I am wearing a pair of loafers with the pads that dopey suggested. The Hapad pads are considerably cheaper than the Orthaheel ($25), but they do not provide as complete an orthotic as the orthaheel. The orthaheel, to my amateur eye, looks to compare to a Hapad, Inc. "Comf-Orthotic 3/4 length insole" ($10 catalog price) with (perhaps) an additional scaphoid pad ($6). The catalog notes that the latter is designed for use, if needed, with the former. So with these products one could build a DIY custom orthotic. One other point worth making. The Orthaheel, while more expensive, is removable and could, I suppose, be moved from shoe to shoe. The Hapad products are wool felt that adhere to the sole of the shoe.
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