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Fused suit with floating chest piece?

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 
Can a fused used suit utilize a floating chest piece? Or is a floating chest piece only possible on canvassed suits?
post #2 of 17
The majority of suits in the mid price range utilize fusing and a floating chest piece. Some manufacturers will extend that chest piece into the lapels and pad-stitch it in place, while others will construct the lapel using fusible materials.

From "˜all fused' on one side and "˜all canvas' on the other, there are a variety of in between construction methods possible.
post #3 of 17
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the clarification, I knew that there were different types of construction methods available, but I was unsure regarding my specific question.
post #4 of 17
See here, the arrow is pointed at the fusing:






And here you see the same kind of jacket without fusing (the black thing is the breast pocket):

post #5 of 17
doesnt fused, by definition, mean not-floating? like a welded joint cannot articulate....they are contrary, are they not?

unless you mean utilize fusing AND a floating chest piece?

I think I am confused.
post #6 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by asdf View Post
doesnt fused, by definition, mean not-floating? like a welded joint cannot articulate....they are contrary, are they not?

unless you mean utilize fusing AND a floating chest piece?

I think I am confused.

Yes, the chest piece is 'floating', the rest is fused.


See jefferyd's diagram:




Here's another example:




Chestpiece (with black fusing beneath it):

post #7 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by NOBD View Post




Geez, look at all that shit... its a wonder a jacket looks good on us.
post #8 of 17
huh, all very interesting. i figured it was a binary choice.
post #9 of 17
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by NOBD View Post
Yes, the chest piece is 'floating', the rest is fused.

See jefferyd's diagram:

Very interesting, thanks for posting!

BTW: I am no way advocating that members rip open their jackets, this forum has been through that fiasco once, let's not repeat it please.
post #10 of 17
To summarize,

there is no such things as a non-floating chest piece.
post #11 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by imageWIS View Post
BTW: I am no way advocating that members rip open their jackets, this forum has been through that fiasco once, let's not repeat it please.

I missed that. Can you recommend any threads?

I'd say: all open an old jacket, look inside, and take pictures. (At your own risk... bla bla, of course.)


- - - - -


@jefferyd: I made a bit of a mess of the dissection of the above suit jacket (sorry about that). How does a professional remove (some of) the lining in a clean but fast way?
post #12 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by NOBD View Post
I'd say: all open an old jacket, look inside, and take pictures.
I have a Huntsman suit on its way, which dates to the time Richard Anderson left them so should be interesting. Stay tuned. STill trying to get my hands on some Kiton.
- - - - -
Quote:
Originally Posted by NOBD View Post

@jefferyd: I made a bit of a mess of the dissection of the above suit jacket (sorry about that). How does a professional remove (some of) the lining in a clean but fast way?
Go in the reverse order in which it was made. It's always a bit messy, regardless.
post #13 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by jefferyd View Post
I have a Huntsman suit on its way, which dates to the time Richard Anderson left them so should be interesting. Stay tuned. STill trying to get my hands on some Kiton.
- - - - -

Definitely interesting!


Quote:
Originally Posted by jefferyd View Post
Go in the reverse order in which it was made. It's always a bit messy, regardless.

Thank you, jefferyd. But, er... then I would have to know the order in which it's made... Unfortunately, that's far beyond my knowledge/skills...

But just to take a look behind the lining, inside the coat"”what tools do you use? Just a ripper (hopefully the right term) and patience, or other tools/techniques?
post #14 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by NOBD View Post

But just to take a look behind the lining, inside the coat"”what tools do you use? Just a ripper (hopefully the right term) and patience, or other tools/techniques?

If you're in a hurry, use a razor blade. Otherwise, patience. Pull up a thread, give it a good yank in the direction of the seam, it should rip several stitches at once, then repeat on the other side of the seam. It's faster and cleaner than using a seam ripper. Open the sleeve lining, the side seam and then the hem and peel back the lining- you can still put it back together fairly easily like this, so if you want to wear it again, stop there, if not, open the collar, the shoulder seams, the felling stitches which hold the facing in place, and you will have a good view of the inside.
post #15 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by jefferyd View Post
If you're in a hurry, use a razor blade. Otherwise, patience. Pull up a thread, give it a good yank in the direction of the seam, it should rip several stitches at once, then repeat on the other side of the seam. It's faster and cleaner than using a seam ripper. Open the sleeve lining, the side seam and then the hem and peel back the lining- you can still put it back together fairly easily like this, so if you want to wear it again, stop there, if not, open the collar, the shoulder seams, the felling stitches which hold the facing in place, and you will have a good view of the inside.

Thank you very much for your explanation.

Do I understand correctly that you just use your fingers for the 'patience method', or do you use the ripper to pull up the thread and then your fingers to rip the stitches? Otherwise, how do you pull up the thread? Forgive me for the specific - and possibly stupid - questions... And thank you beforehand for your patience in answering it.
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