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1976 Judgment of Paris reenacted, California wins

post #1 of 32
Thread Starter 
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/europe/5013910.stm

Interesting story about the famous 1976 wine tasting and the reenactment yesterday. I thought this bit was funny:

"I'm very impressed," said Christian Vanneque, a French judge who was at the original tasting in 1976.

"I don't know if I will be able to go back to France," he added. "After a second time, they will kill me."
post #2 of 32
I have to say, this article is messy. Where are you supposed to find the results this time around? Has it occurred or will it occur on Saturday? I went to Copia's site, nothing is clear to me.

I will point out that the bottles are "given" by producers, they are not purchased by the organizers, which does take away some of the credibility. Also, several French producers openly declined to participate, among whom Paul Pontallier (Château Margaux). There is much to be said about this "tasting": selection of judges, bottles up for tasting, locations chosen for tasting, etc.

As I understand it, the most recent millesimes will be announced according to region, so it will be a semi-blind tasting.
post #3 of 32
Thread Starter 
http://www.copia.org/content/node/483

Here you go. It was kind of buried on their site.
post #4 of 32
This was a lot more important thirty years ago when it put California onto the world stage. Now I hope people understand that it's more about what their individual palates prefer rather than what some panelists who they've most likely never met enjoy.
post #5 of 32
Am I the only one who finds CA wines in general too bombastic, fine for drinking on their own but lousy with food? When I buy domestic wine now I always go straight for the Washington State section. Their wines seem much more subtle than the Californians'.
post #6 of 32
I agree with your assessment and would add Oregon wines to Washington. Most of those I would not choose if I were out of the domestic market and presented with the choice of Old World and American wines, equally dutied and marked up.
post #7 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by SGladwell
Am I the only one who finds CA wines in general too bombastic, fine for drinking on their own but lousy with food? When I buy domestic wine now I always go straight for the Washington State section. Their wines seem much more subtle than the Californians'.


No, you are not the only one.

This is particularly problematic in the white wines which taste of nothing other than oak.

The problem goes much deeper. Americans tend to be in love with the biggest, and this is manifest in what you say about the wines. However, another problem is that only the biggest grape varietals have caught the fancy of the American public. When I am in France, I tend to drink more wines from the Loire and from Alsace, as I think the grapes and wines of these regions go better with food. I would go as far as saying that Riesling is the single best food friendly wine. The same goes for reds, the wines of Burgundy both grand and not are terrific with food. Bordeaux is wonderful, but mates with roast leg of lamb rather than more complex fare. Finally, Champagne is a beverage for all foods and all times. It is rarely paired with food in the US other than caviar and oysters (which are both better with vodka).
post #8 of 32
As for versatility I agree Riesling is the best but Gruner Veltliner is also very good, and very underappreciated.
post #9 of 32
I have never tried it, as I am not terribly familiar with Austrian wines. I will pick upi a few bottles.
post #10 of 32
GV, imho, tends to be overpriced and tastes faintly of gasoline, the cheesy GruVe (groovy) marketing ploy is also pretty annoying. Other whites that are great with food are Alsatian or West Coast Gewurztraminers; CA Marsanne/Rousanne or Viognier blends, their Rhone equivalents tend to be pricey or not that good; and Vernaccia di San Gimignano, Terruzzi and Puthod is a reliable producer.
post #11 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by whoopee
As for versatility I agree Riesling is the best but Gruner Veltliner is also very good, and very underappreciated.

GV is extremely variable. There's one that they sell in the US at places like Whole Foods (Berger I think it's called; it has a white label with green lettering) that's consistently awful. It tastes worse than the swill you buy out of Viennese cart-vendors to go with your Käsekrainer after a night at the Havana Club.

I am fond of the ones grown at Kloserneuburg and had an enjoyable week-long frolic through the Wachau a few years ago with tastes I've not been able to duplicate in the US.
post #12 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by iammatt
When I am in France, I tend to drink more wines from the Loire and from Alsace, as I think the grapes and wines of these regions go better with food. I would go as far as saying that Riesling is the single best food friendly wine.

Excellent taste in wine, one of the most beautifully furnished homes I've ever seen pictures of...how the hell are you a Republican?
post #13 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by SGladwell
Excellent taste in wine, one of the most beautifully furnished homes I've ever seen pictures of...how the hell are you a Republican?
Thank you!... I think As far as wine, I think that Alsace is currently blessed with one of the finest winemakers in all the world in Zind-Humbrecht. They make impeccable wines from $20-$400. I can also recommend Kermit Lynch Wine Merchants for anybody who would like to sample excellent lesser known wines that are generally terrific. They offer a case sampler every month for $120 that includes a great variety of food friendly wines. They also import many truly excellent Rhone, Burgundy and Alsatians. They are not dissimilar to Moore Brothers, except that they have been doing the same thing for nearly forty years and their wines end at a bit higher level than Moore's.
post #14 of 32
I almost never drink domestic wines. I find California reds to be borderline ridiculous both in compositon and price (is there anyone left who hasn't opened a winery in Napa or Sonoma?). Oregon Pinot just does not do anything for me. My preference is for reds from Spain, Argentina and Italy with the occasional good value Bordeaux thrown in. For whites, I almost exclusively drink German and Alsatian wines.
post #15 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by SGladwell
Excellent taste in wine, one of the most beautifully furnished homes I've ever seen pictures of...how the hell are you a Republican?

Yeah, how the hell are you a Republican? Don't you know that lefties are the only people with taste, intelligence, morals, integrity, etc? Just ask one, they'll be glad to tell you all about it .
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