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Fish - Page 3

post #31 of 54
Rick Stein's Compete Seafood is a great reference and worth the investment.

I think grilled fish is pretty underrated, but I live in Cali where it's a little easier
post #32 of 54
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by rjacobs View Post
I think grilled fish is pretty underrated, but I live in Cali where it's a little easier

one big thing I miss about NYC is my own grill.
post #33 of 54
As a fisherman who usually brings home the catch, this area (west central Florida) has an abundance of good finfish.

I like grilling whole speckled sea trout, Spanish macekrel, redfish, shark (bonnethead and blacktip mainly), whole mangrove/lane snapper, grouper, amberjack, and blackfin tuna when I am lucky enough to get one.

I will sautee pompano (skin on) with some red onion, tomatoes, olives, and white wine for a side sauce. Sauteeing is good for southern flounder, redfish, sting ray, grouper, and of the snappers, porgies, and snook (though I no longer eat snook- only catch and release).

Finally i do love to smoke Spanish and King mackerel- they are oily but not too much and are perfect for smoking over hickory. mix with onion, celery, and mayo for smoked fish spread.
post #34 of 54
I've been thinking about pickling some fish. It is pretty easy, vinegar/salt brine, fish, onions, and a fridge for a few days. . .
post #35 of 54
i'm with sd1 on the oily fish on the grill thing: if you have a good japanese grocery near you, you can usually find whole fresh sardines and mackerel. they're terrific grilled and really easy. as for pickling fish, google sarde en saor ... or pm me. it's a venetian dish where you fry sardines (can do with anchovies), then pickle them overnight with pinenuts and raisins. killer stuff.
post #36 of 54
FG, I've actually got some sardines in the fridge my roomie and I were going to cure. Served in a few days w/ caramelized onions, toasted pinenuts, golden raisins, and lemon emulsion.
Any advice? We haven't decided on how to cure them.
post #37 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by kwilkinson View Post
FG, I've actually got some sardines in the fridge my roomie and I were going to cure. Served in a few days w/ caramelized onions, toasted pinenuts, golden raisins, and lemon emulsion.
Any advice? We haven't decided on how to cure them.

Go to the Pacific Ocean with a rod and reel in hand. Put the sardines on the end of your hook. Cast out into the ocean. Wait. Drink beer. Scratch ball. Drink more beer. Catch a fish. Go home. Cook up the better fish you caught using the sardine.
post #38 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by foodguy View Post
i'm with sd1 on the oily fish on the grill thing: if you have a good japanese grocery near you, you can usually find whole fresh sardines and mackerel. they're terrific grilled and really easy.
as for pickling fish, google sarde en saor ... or pm me. it's a venetian dish where you fry sardines (can do with anchovies), then pickle them overnight with pinenuts and raisins. killer stuff.

Damn, sounds good. Lots of recipes on the web. I'll have to give it a try. Thanks.
post #39 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by BDC2823 View Post
Go to the Pacific Ocean with a rod and reel in hand. Put the sardines on the end of your hook. Cast out into the ocean. Wait. Drink beer. Scratch ball. Drink more beer. Catch a fish. Go home. Cook up the better fish you caught using the sardine.

Sardines are awesome dawg. We have 10 pounds in the fridge. I fileted them all this morning. We're probably going to try 4-5 different kinds of cures and see which we like best.
post #40 of 54
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by kwilkinson View Post
FG, I've actually got some sardines in the fridge my roomie and I were going to cure. Served in a few days w/ caramelized onions, toasted pinenuts, golden raisins, and lemon emulsion.
Any advice? We haven't decided on how to cure them.

I can't comment on curing.

But pan frying didn't turn out so well for me. Stunk the apartment up for 4-5 days with that dense fish odor.
post #41 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by kwilkinson View Post
Sardines are awesome dawg. We have 10 pounds in the fridge. I fileted them all this morning. We're probably going to try 4-5 different kinds of cures and see which we like best.

As a kid and even today when I go fishing in the ocean, we go on up to the bait barge and get a couple scoops of sardines to put in the bait tank. We then go out and catch bigger and tastier fish using the sardines as bait. Why eat the prey when you can have the predator? Something about eating the bait I used as a kid never appealed to me. A common bait for freshwater bass and trout are earthworms. Do you also eat earthworms?
post #42 of 54
Thread Starter 
worms aren't as delicious as sardines.
post #43 of 54
sardines for bait? that's funny. the last time i went out deep-sea fishing i vowed never to do it again because we were using live sardines and live squid to catch 6-inch rockfish. the bait was better eating than what we were catching. fresh sardines are awesome. one of my absolute favorite fish. this is my version of sarde en saor (not totally authentic, but reasonably so, and the technique is good enough to be adaptable however you want). Sarde en saor (sweet-and-sour sardines) Total time: 1 1/2 hours, plus 2 days refrigeration Servings: 8 Note: This must be made at least two days in advance, and it will keep in the refrigerator for up to a week. Canola oil 2 pounds sardines, cleaned 1/4 cup flour Salt 2 pounds onions, thinly sliced 1/4 cup olive oil 3/4 cup white wine vinegar 1/4 cup white wine 1 bay leaf 1/3 cup raisins 1/3 cup toasted pine nuts 1. Heat one-fourth to one-half inch of canola oil in a heavy skillet until it is hot enough that food sizzles when added. Lightly flour the sardines and fry until lightly browned, about a minute per side. Lift the sardines from the oil and drain them on paper towels. Season with salt. 2. Drain the oil from the skillet, but don't wipe it clean. Add the onions and the olive oil and cook over very low heat until the onions wilt and turn golden (not brown). This can take as long as an hour. Stir the onions from time to time. 3. When the onions are soft and sweet, add the vinegar, wine and bay leaf and increase the heat to medium. Cook until the liquid has reduced to a glaze, about 10 minutes. Remove the pan from the heat, discard the bay leaf, and stir in the raisins and pine nuts. Cool. 4. Arrange a layer of sardines skin-side up in the bottom of a small (10 1/2-inch by 6 1/2-inch) baking dish. Cover with half the onions. Repeat, layering the remaining sardines and onions. Pour any liquid that's left in the pan over the top. Cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate at least 2 days before serving. 5. To serve, spoon the sardines and onions onto toast.
post #44 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by BDC2823 View Post
As a kid and even today when I go fishing in the ocean, we go on up to the bait barge and get a couple scoops of sardines to put in the bait tank. We then go out and catch bigger and tastier fish using the sardines as bait. Why eat the prey when you can have the predator? Something about eating the bait I used as a kid never appealed to me. A common bait for freshwater bass and trout are earthworms. Do you also eat earthworms?

aside from sheer deliciousness, you want a great reason to eat the prey not the predator? because the oceans are getting fished out due to our concentrating on top-of-the-foodchain fish that a) have relatively low biomass; and b) take many years to reach reproductive age. sardines, squid, mackerel all are plentiful and replenish populations quickly. plus, they're delicious, did i say that?
post #45 of 54
Thanks foodguy. Will use two of our pounds to try your recipe.
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