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Public university vs. land grant university - Page 2

post #16 of 29
When I started at Auburn University (originally known as Alabama Polytechnic University), A land grant university, all freshmen had to pass a swimming test or take swimming. We were told this was owing to the school being a land grant university. This was mid-70's. Any of my contemporaries attending other LGU's have to do this same exercise?

Of course it may really have to do with the joke I heard YEARS ago: There were 3 Auburn students killed in an accident recently. They were riding in the back of an open bed pickup truck and the truck left the road and ended up in a creek. The 3 victims drowned when they failed to escape when they couldn't get the tailgate open.........
post #17 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by ArteEtLabore14 View Post
Well from what I've read a 'state school' is a "colloquial term for a state university." Since the University of Connecticut is not a part of the Connecticut State University System (which is comprised of WCSU, ECSU, CCSU, & SCSU) that would mean that it is in fact not a state school.


It's a state school even though it's not part of the state university system. UConn is a public institution that receives CT taxpayer money and it serves the people of CT. Read about it right here: http://www.uconn.edu/about.php

Quote:
Perennially ranked the top public university in New England, the University of Connecticut now stands among the best public institutions in the nation.

public = state
post #18 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by JLibourel View Post
Unless I am mistaken or things have changed, land grant colleges and universities have to offer military training, e.g., ROTC. In my days at UCLA two years of ROTC were compulsory for all able bodied male students who were U.S. citizens and who had not had prior military service.

My university is a land grant institution, and we do have ROTC here. However, it's not compulsory. I also can't comment on whether they're required to have it or not.
post #19 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by crazyquik View Post
Um, no.

Land grant schools are more likely to be cow colleges; teaching agriculture, engineering, etc. They were created by a young-ish country to help drive the industrial revolution along (and because we had a lot of land to give away). This coincided with the shift towards the German research institution model, and away from merely learning by recitation or in the classical styles. They were more likely to create engineers and industrialists, not attorneys or politicians. And when medicine and pharmacy schools were created, they were more likely to go to the flagship, pre-Morrell Act schools.

These are likelihoods, but they're certainly not always the case. The University of North Dakota is our state's flagship school. It was established as a liberal arts university and has always been such. It has both the med school and the law school. North Dakota State University, in Fargo, is the ag school (we enjoy callling it "Moo U," and -- I swear to God -- there is a Farmer Fraternity there). The "normal school" (later, teachers' college) was created in a third town.
post #20 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Teacher View Post
These are likelihoods, but they're certainly not always the case. The University of North Dakota is our state's flagship school. It was established as a liberal arts university and has always been such. It has both the med school and the law school. North Dakota State University, in Fargo, is the ag school (we enjoy callling it "Moo U," and -- I swear to God -- there is a Farmer Fraternity there). The "normal school" (later, teachers' college) was created in a third town.


According to wikipedia, only North Dakota State is a land-grant school. Again, according to wikipedia, U of ND actually began before ND was a state, meaning it was created before the Morrell Act would have applied.

So, you've buttressed my statement

There are also farmer fraternities at the local cow college here.
post #21 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by crazyquik View Post
According to wikipedia, only North Dakota State is a land-grant school. Again, according to wikipedia, U of ND actually began before ND was a state, meaning it was created before the Morrell Act would have applied.

So, you've buttressed my statement

There are also farmer fraternities at the local cow college here.

Strange, the university identifies itself as a land-grant school.
post #22 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by crazyquik View Post
The most prestigious public universities were those which began in the classic style. The University of Michigan, UNC, UVA, UGA, Tennessee, Alabama, etc. A notable exception is the University of Texas in Austin; which was the second state university in Texas (A&M was first, and the landgrant school) however it became the more prestigious. Berkeley was a Morrell Act school that ceded it's responsibilities under the act to some other UC school so that it could pursue a more liberal arts/law/etc curriculum. And, it's a perennial top 5 public university now.
Oh, I thought those were all land-grant, save the UCs.
post #23 of 29
Another important difference: Land-grants have Extension Service offices. These are the people who take the research that is done and take it out into the field (or fields, as it oftentimes literally is).

And by no means are the land grant schools the more prestigious. I offer you the University of Washington and Washington State University. One of these schools has the top ranked teaching hospital in the country and has had some 35 or so Rhodes Scholars. The other has a student body consisting almost entirely of cow herders (including many of my dumber HS classmates) and is named Washington State University.

b
post #24 of 29
University of Wisconsin is a bit of an anomoly; it opened before the Morrill Act, was converted to a land-grant school, but retained it's flagship status. UWisc has long had a view that the borders of the university were coterminous with the borders of the state, however.
post #25 of 29
No, Teach, NDSU is the land-grant school here. Moooooooooooo!
post #26 of 29
Michigan State is the Land Grand School in Michigan (Can there be more than one?). They defiantely have the farm program and the regional extension offices. I always understood that part of the charter with a land grand was that it had to provide training/curriculum/support/focus on Ag stuff.

Are the A & M's basically the same thing?
post #27 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by jgold47 View Post
Michigan State is the Land Grand School in Michigan (Can there be more than one?). They defiantely have the farm program and the regional extension offices. I always understood that part of the charter with a land grand was that it had to provide training/curriculum/support/focus on Ag stuff.

Are the A & M's basically the same thing?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Land-grant_university

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sea_grant_colleges

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sun_Grant_Colleges

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Space_grant_colleges
post #28 of 29

There seem to be a lot of bias against land grant schools in many of these posts. There is no concrete reason why a modern land grant school cannot exceed it's public funded counterpart academically. Auburn University, a land grant school has higher admission standards and higher academic ratings than the university of Alabama. Alabama focuses on scalar growth (increasing total numbers of students and graduates), while Auburn focuses on vector oriented growth (higher academic standards with slower growth). That said, the pressure of excelling in financially lucrative NCAA athletic competition causes both publicly funded and land grant schools to offer less than rigorous coursework for "the athletically or artistically gifted". That's why schools like Alabama have to include cheerleaders as part of their athlete count in order to keep their APR numbers up and why Auburn has had issues with it's Sociology Department in the past. However, many of the "magazine" ratings place Bama above Auburn in their list because Alabama recruits more National Merit Finalists for liberal arts programs and Alabama ha s huge endowment. Those two things skew those ratings. 

post #29 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim McDade View Post

There seem to be a lot of bias against land grant schools in many of these posts. There is no concrete reason why a modern land grant school cannot exceed it's public funded counterpart academically. Auburn University, a land grant school has higher admission standards and higher academic ratings than the university of Alabama. Alabama focuses on scalar growth (increasing total numbers of students and graduates), while Auburn focuses on vector oriented growth (higher academic standards with slower growth). That said, the pressure of excelling in financially lucrative NCAA athletic competition causes both publicly funded and land grant schools to offer less than rigorous coursework for "the athletically or artistically gifted". That's why schools like Alabama have to include cheerleaders as part of their athlete count in order to keep their APR numbers up and why Auburn has had issues with it's Sociology Department in the past. However, many of the "magazine" ratings place Bama above Auburn in their list because Alabama recruits more National Merit Finalists for liberal arts programs and Alabama ha s huge endowment. Those two things skew those ratings. 

But Florida State would probably lose against Alabama, and it won't against Auburn. Therefore, your entire argument is invalid.
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