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What does being gentlemanly mean to you? - Page 4

post #46 of 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by voxsartoria View Post
GENTEEL, adj. Refined, after the fashion of a gent.

Observe with care, my son, the distinction I reveal:
A gentleman is gentle and a gent genteel.
Heed not the definitions your "Unabridged" presents,
For dictionary makers are generally gents.

G.J.

- B

I don't think I know that one.
G.J. stands for George Jones, yes?
post #47 of 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by voxsartoria View Post
FASHION, n.
A despot whom the wise ridicule and obey.


- B

BORE, n.
A person who talks when you wish him to listen.

- L
post #48 of 65
Emily Post, 1922, on the clothes of a gentleman:
Quote:
The business suit or three-piece sack is made or marred by its cut alone. It is supposed to be an every-day inconspicuous garment and should be. A few rules to follow are: Don’t choose striking patterns of materials; suitable woolen stuffs come in endless variety, and any which look plain at a short distance are “safe,” though they may show a mixture of colors or pattern when viewed closely.\t Don’t get too light a blue, too bright a green, or anything suggesting a horse blanket. At the present moment trousers are made with a cuff; sleeves are not. Lapels are moderately small. Padded shoulders are an abomination. Peg-topped trousers equally bad. If you must be eccentric, save your efforts for the next fancy dress ball, where you may wear what you please, but in your business clothing be reasonable. Above everything, don’t wear white socks, and don’t cover yourself with chains, fobs, scarf pins, lodge emblems, etc., and don’t wear “horsey” shirts and neckties. You will only make a bad impression on every one you meet. The clothes of a gentleman are always conservative; and it is safe to avoid everything that can possibly come under the heading of “novelty.”
post #49 of 65
Thread Starter 
post #50 of 65
A gentleman is someone ready to pass on a good joke rather to hurt and humiliate somebody else..
post #51 of 65
The True Gentleman is the man whose conduct proceeds from good will and an acute sense of propriety, and whose self-control is equal to all emergencies; who does not make the poor man conscious of his poverty, the obscure man of his obscurity, or any man of his inferiority or deformity; who is himself humbled if necessity compels him to humble another; who does not flatter wealth, cringe before power, or boast of his own possessions or achievements; who speaks with frankness but always with sincerity and sympathy; whose deed follows his word; who thinks of the rights and feelings of others, rather than his own; and who appears well in any company, a man with whom honor is sacred and virtue safe.
post #52 of 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by iammatt View Post
The True Gentleman is the man whose conduct proceeds from good will and an acute sense of propriety, and whose self-control is equal to all emergencies; who does not make the poor man conscious of his poverty, the obscure man of his obscurity, or any man of his inferiority or deformity; who is himself humbled if necessity compels him to humble another; who does not flatter wealth, cringe before power, or boast of his own possessions or achievements; who speaks with frankness but always with sincerity and sympathy; whose deed follows his word; who thinks of the rights and feelings of others, rather than his own; and who appears well in any company, a man with whom honor is sacred and virtue safe.

I guess you and I are fucked then.


- B
post #53 of 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by iammatt View Post
The True Gentleman is the man whose conduct proceeds from good will and an acute sense of propriety, and whose self-control is equal to all emergencies; who does not make the poor man conscious of his poverty, the obscure man of his obscurity, or any man of his inferiority or deformity; who is himself humbled if necessity compels him to humble another; who does not flatter wealth, cringe before power, or boast of his own possessions or achievements; who speaks with frankness but always with sincerity and sympathy; whose deed follows his word; who thinks of the rights and feelings of others, rather than his own; and who appears well in any company, a man with whom honor is sacred and virtue safe.

I fully agree with Iammatt.

A gentleman always has three essential qualities:Empathy, modesty and noblesse d'esprit.

Without them, you can't be a real Gentleman.

By itself, No bespoke suit , as well executed as you want , will make you a gentleman .
post #54 of 65
The true test of a gentleman is how he treats people who can't possibly do him any good.
post #55 of 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by voxsartoria View Post
I guess you and I are fucked then.
- B

Why so humble?

It's quite apparent that you both are borderliners, having fun but steering into the side of the gentlemen at the right moment.

Iammatt, source for your quote?

- M
post #56 of 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by mmkn View Post
Why so humble?

It's quite apparent that you both are borderliners, having fun but steering into the side of the gentlemen at the right moment.

Iammatt, source for your quote?

- M
John Walter Wayland. We had to memorize it as pledges.
post #57 of 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by iammatt View Post
John Walter Wayland. We had to memorize it as pledges.

ΣΑΕ...no wonder it had no effect.


- B
post #58 of 65
It means trying hard not to sound like anybody in the "In the past 10 days, has MC become bizarro land? " thread. What a bunch of tossers.
post #59 of 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by knittieguy View Post
The true test of a gentleman is how he treats people who can't possibly do him any good.

That cuts to the heart of it. Holding doors for people, saying please and thank you (whether you mean it, or not), a thousand little things. Dress has nothing to do with it. You can put lipstick on a pig, but that doesn't make her a lady.
(knittieguy, please, where, or who, did that phrase come from?)
post #60 of 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by MKB View Post
That cuts to the heart of it. Holding doors for people, saying please and thank you (whether you mean it, or not), a thousand little things. Dress has nothing to do with it. You can put lipstick on a pig, but that doesn't make her a lady.
(knittieguy, please, where, or who, did that phrase come from?)

I don't know. My grandfather, who was indeed a gentleman, used to keep a small piece of paper with that quote on it in his wallet and carried it with him always. I try and live by it. I don't always succeed.
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