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What does being gentlemanly mean to you? - Page 2

post #16 of 65
The following has been in the sig line of my personal e-mail:

Putting a man in an expensive bespoke suit does not make him a gentleman.
post #17 of 65
British, nerdy and dressed with "braces", as they call it.
post #18 of 65
Wearing spats and carrying a cane.
post #19 of 65
Clothing is only one part of a gentleman's deportment.
post #20 of 65
To me, being a gentleman means acting and dressing a certain way...
post #21 of 65
In before reach-arounds!
post #22 of 65
Hi Moo. My input is this...Good manners above all. Good manners in any situation short of having ones life threatened. It costs nothing to give and makes for a better day for you and everyone you've come across. Every man should own a book of etiquette, preferrable one printed in the 1960's or before, and read it and make it a daily practice. I saw a documentary recently called 'Rude', and in it, there was a woman known as 'Miss Manners'. It was sad when she stated that even in the 1950's & 60's people were rude even then, but it is far far worse today. (watch online here> http://www.cbc.ca/documentaries/doczone/2008/rude/) As we are defenders of dressing well, or even dandyism (tradional or modern) then I believe it is also a worthy cause to include good manners at all times. Etiquette should come naturally, but does require study and effort. Words like 'please' and 'thank you'. Holding a door open for a woman. Giving a seat on the bus or train to an older woman, elderly woman or pregnant woman (or even an elderly pregnant woman.... ..beat you to it..) to me, are a few important measures of gentlemanly conduct.
post #23 of 65
Keepin' it real, while keepin' it civil. Yo. And just being nice. Usually.
post #24 of 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by shasta View Post
ok ill bite - not the way you act good sir
+1 In fact moo, your e-identity has the mental maturity of... a cabbage perhaps. Repeatedly making fun about someone's height, and then taking serious umbrage and threatening real-life violence when someone does something similar to your wife, and then going on with some BS feel-good my daddy taught me never to compromise my vaaaaallllluuuuuueeeeess story in an attempt to justify your behaviour is BS on a plane many times removed and superior to typical SF shenanigans.
post #25 of 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by apropos View Post
+1

In fact moo, your e-identity has the mental maturity of... a cabbage perhaps.

Repeatedly making fun about someone's height, and then taking serious umbrage and threatening real-life violence when someone does something similar to your wife, and then going on with some BS feel-good my daddy taught me never to compromise my vaaaaallllluuuuuueeeeess story in an attempt to justify your behaviour is BS on a plane many times removed and superior to typical SF shenanigans.

So what do you really think?
post #26 of 65
post #27 of 65
Dear Gawd!
post #28 of 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by Man Of Lint View Post
Hi Moo.
My input is this...Good manners above all.
Good manners in any situation short of having ones life threatened.
It costs nothing to give and makes for a better day for you and everyone you've come across.
Every man should own a book of etiquette, preferrable one printed in the 1960's or before,
and read it and make it a daily practice.
I saw a documentary recently called 'Rude', and in it, there was a woman known as 'Miss Manners'.
It was sad when she stated that even in the 1950's & 60's people were rude even then,
but it is far far worse today.
(watch online here> http://www.cbc.ca/documentaries/doczone/2008/rude/)
As we are defenders of dressing well, or even dandyism (tradional or modern) then I believe it is also a worthy cause to include good manners at all times.
Etiquette should come naturally, but does require study and effort.
Words like 'please' and 'thank you'. Holding a door open for a woman. Giving a seat on the bus or train to an older woman, elderly woman or pregnant woman (or even an elderly pregnant woman....
..beat you to it..) to me, are a few important measures of gentlemanly conduct.

Is it possible to "become" a (presumably autodidact) gentleman if one was not brought up as one?
post #29 of 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by blackbowtie View Post
Is it possible to "become" a (presumably autodidact) gentleman if one was not brought up as one?


Don't see any reason why it can't work the other way.
post #30 of 65
"a true gentleman is one who is never unintentionally rude" Oscar Wilde
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