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Cordovan Care - Page 7

post #91 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by 4characters View Post

My shell shoes are somewhat dry and I need to condition them. I want to fully replenish the leather to perfect condition, but just don’t know the steps. Should I put macadamia nut oil on my shoes? I’ve heard it’s similar to mink or jojoba. Also is pure oil ok or should it be mixed in with waxes or something? Also how do I pre-clean the leather before conditioning?  Any help would be appreciated.



Thanks





Saphir renovateur or Venetian shoe cream.
post #92 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by im2bz2p View Post
 

Hello,

What is confusing is that Alden says wax only for any cordovan leather and then Carmina says cream only.......

So basically the two main manufacturers of shell cordovan shoes do not agree on the care process.

In addition, I have read several different opinions about how to care shoes made of it.

And even Mr Horween suggests that "if something works for you, keep doing it".

It seems there is not a standard method for the care of these shoes.

I just gave up trying to get rid of small scuffs.

post #93 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by jdiaz26 View Post
 

So basically the two main manufacturers of shell cordovan shoes do not agree on the care process.

In addition, I have read several different opinions about how to care shoes made of it.

And even Mr Horween suggests that "if something works for you, keep doing it".

It seems there is not a standard method for the care of these shoes.

I just gave up trying to get rid of small scuffs.

 

Nick Horween has recommended 'venetian cream' for conditioning dry cordovan, and this has worked for me.  Small scuffs can be dealt with by simply brushing and buffing, while larger scuffs are best minimized with the use of a deer bone; these two methods worked for me.

post #94 of 100
If you are having trouble getting rid of small scuffs in shell cordovan you are certainly doing something wrong . They should easily be removed with a deer bone , the back of a spoon,apiece of rounded hardwood, a rag wrapped around a stiff brush etc,etc .
As for restoring old dry she'll make sure all the old wax is removed , treat the shell lightly with a high quality pure neatsfoot oil (Lexol N&F) , bone, brush and buff the shoes until they don't appear to be getting any shinier and then apply a coat of saphir cordovan creame either neutral or color as the case may be . Continue to bone brush and buff . Should be good to go
Edited by englade321 - 11/10/13 at 12:29pm
post #95 of 100
Quote:
 This would tend to discourage allowing a "brushman" at the airport to do shine your Cordovans.

 

  Would your average shoe shine guy be able to discern cordovan from calf?

 

  This may have been answered already, but is it safe to trust getting your Cordovans cleaned by the shoeshine service you find at Nordstrom's or a brick & mortar shoe shop.

post #96 of 100
Have them wipe down the shoe with a barely damp cloth and brush and buff only with dry brush and rag . Most of these guys don't even know what shell cordovan leather is much less how to care for it . They will use too much wax . This will cloud the finish cause it to collect dust and generally create problems that can be avoided .
The only reason to use wax on shell cordovan is to save a couple or bucks . The manufacturers such as Alden for example recommend it because they date back to a timewhen dedicated products were unavailable
Do yourselveves a favor guys and spend a few extra bucks on a high quality dedicated shell cordovan product . Personally I like Saphir but there are certainly others out there
post #97 of 100

I'll try a dedicated cordovan product, but I'm miffed that when I bought my black Alden longwing's they threw in a smal jar of black polish (wax).  My assumption would be that's their recommended polish. 

post #98 of 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpiffEngineer View Post
 

 

Nick Horween has recommended 'venetian cream' for conditioning dry cordovan, and this has worked for me.  Small scuffs can be dealt with by simply brushing and buffing, while larger scuffs are best minimized with the use of a deer bone; these two methods worked for me.

Thanks for your answer. According to my experience, brushing and buffing makes them shine, but cuffs are still there. They don't look bad while I wear them, scuffs can hardly be seen if you don't look closer. But they seem to resist brushing and buffing. I will get one of those deer bones to try with it. I already tried the back of a spoon, which seemed to have a slightly positive effect.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by englade321 View Post

If you are having trouble getting rid of small scuffs in shell cordovan you are certainly doing something wrong . They should easily be removed with a deer bone , the back of a spoon,apiece of rounded hardwood, a rag wrapped around a stiff brush etc,etc .
As for restoring old dry she'll make sure all the old wax is removed , treat the shell lightly with a high quality pure neatsfoot oil (Lexol N&F) , bone, brush and buff the shoes until they don't appear to be getting any shinier and then apply a coat of saphir cordovan creame either neutral or color as the case may be . Continue to bone brush and buff . Should be good to go

Thanks for your help. As I've written above, I will try the deer bone and see if it can improve the results obtained with the back of a spoon.

post #99 of 100
That's because it is .Under normal conditions it will be many years before you need any type of leather conditioner . The wax only deals with the surface of the shoe . That is is why every now and then an old pair will dry out (get old enough )to crack . Also the conditions under which the shoes spent their lives come into play . Consider a pair of nos stored on a dark shelf in New Orleans as opposed to the same ones stored the same way in Scottsdale Ariz
There are many manufactured items capable of lasting well past what is considered their normal useful lifetime but few if any manufacturers include detailed instructions on how to accomplish this . Just think about an automobile . See what I mean ?
You don't need any products for new pair of shell cordovan shoes . At least not for a number of years but when you do I personally would use one that conditions with neat afoot oil . Get a deer bone (arguably) a horse hair brush ,some rags and a can of wax that matches the color if the outside edge of the welt
Every time you remove your shoes :
1. Wipe them throughly and firmly with a barely damp rag
2.Brush for @ 2-5 min ea shoe with a horse hair brush
3.Buff to a shine with a flannel type cotton cloth
Every few wearings work the shoes over with the deer bone between steps 1&2
Remove scuffs as needed with deer bone
Wax welt edge to waterproof and improve appearance
It might be useful to have on hand a can of wax close to the color of the shoes in case it is needed to repair a large scuff buut not really necessary
post #100 of 100
Hi there,
I just purchased a pair of alden cordovans on ebay. The uppers are in good condition but it seems like someone used regular polish and they are all sticky and waxy now. Can u suggest a way to get rid of that polish? I tried rubbing alcohol in a small spot and it seemed to make it smooth...
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