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suede shoes - post 'em here! - Page 108

post #1606 of 1924
Quote:
Originally Posted by nutcracker View Post

X Post from the Japanese Shoes thread:

Il Quadrifoglio by Atsushi Qnai
Jodhpur Boots in goat suede. Bespoke for a client.

AppleMark
AppleMark
AppleMark

Goat suede are buttery soft, but apparently very thin. So there is a layer of backing (pigskin) sandwitched between the suede and the lining.

 

Beautiful boot

post #1607 of 1924
I have a pair of snuff suede austerity brogue wingtips and chocolate brown loafers, would you guys consider these an "all season" shoe or mainly spring and fall?
post #1608 of 1924
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cuttingboard View Post

I have a pair of snuff suede austerity brogue wingtips and chocolate brown loafers, would you guys consider these an "all season" shoe or mainly spring and fall?

I'd wear these year-round.
post #1609 of 1924
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cuttingboard View Post

I have a pair of snuff suede austerity brogue wingtips and chocolate brown loafers, would you guys consider these an "all season" shoe or mainly spring and fall?

I'd wear these year-round.
post #1610 of 1924
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sander View Post

I'd wear these year-round.

Thanks...I always thought suede was a spring/summer material but I guess it depends more on the color than material?
post #1611 of 1924
I just asked this in the STF thread, but I thought I would check here as well:

I'm looking for some new suede shoes, and two Sutors from STF caught my eye - these and these.

I'm leaning towards the first pair with the punched cap, because generally a medallion toe without a cap, like the second pair, usually looks weird to me. However, I do kinda like the look of these Sutors with the medallion. Judging by the measurements on the site, sizing looks to be consistent for both....so I'm torn. Anybody have experience with either of these and can provide some useful feedback? Thanks!
post #1612 of 1924
I prefer the first one to the second and like you, I would prefer the second if it did not have the medallion.
post #1613 of 1924
I'm not a big fan of cap toe suede (seems like an oxymoron to me), but the Adelaide style needs some balance on the toe so I think the medallion works for that purpose. I would prefer the second pair.
post #1614 of 1924
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cuttingboard View Post

I prefer the first one to the second and like you, I would prefer the second if it did not have the medallion.

I'm not a big fan of plain toe balmorals (plain toe bluchers I like....not sure why I like one and not the other), and I like the medallion on the second pair, I just don't like that it's a medallion with no cap.
Quote:
Originally Posted by glenjay View Post

I'm not a big fan of cap toe suede (seems like an oxymoron to me), but the Adelaide style needs some balance on the toe so I think the medallion works for that purpose. I would prefer the second pair.

What exactly makes a suede captoe an oxymoron? Is there some sort of purpose a captoe serves on a shoe made from a different type of material that it doesn't serve on a suede shoe? I'm not an expert on shoe construction or history, so if there's an actual reason then I'm interested to hear why that is.
post #1615 of 1924
post #1616 of 1924
Quote:
Originally Posted by Beatlegeuse View Post

I'm not a big fan of plain toe balmorals (plain toe bluchers I like....not sure why I like one and not the other), and I like the medallion on the second pair, I just don't like that it's a medallion with no cap.

What exactly makes a suede captoe an oxymoron? Is there some sort of purpose a captoe serves on a shoe made from a different type of material that it doesn't serve on a suede shoe? I'm not an expert on shoe construction or history, so if there's an actual reason then I'm interested to hear why that is.

First let me say that there are plenty of examples of great looking cap toe suede shoes, many in this thread alone.

That being said, the cap toe style is the defining style for a business shoe to be worn with business suits (lounge suits). Starting with stitch cap, then punch cap, semi-brogue and quarter brogue in order of formality; typically in black calfskin for city clothing styles and colors.

Certainly any style of shoe can be made with any type of leather, I just think that certain styles work better with certain leathers. Suede is inherently a casual leather (country), whereas the cap toe style is more of a business (city) style. To me it’s like wearing a tweed jacket with worsted wool slacks.

The look just doesn’t work for me, but it’s based more on personal perspective than anything else.

Just as a side note: (in relation to shoe construction and history) using the term balmoral as a general description of a closed lace shoe is really an Americanism. The balmoral shoe is a derivative of the balmoral boot which is mainly defined by a horizontal seam across the quarters, without a seam to the welt. The term oxford is more universally used/accepted to describe a closed lace shoe, be it balmoral, adelaide, swan neck, or other seam structure.
post #1617 of 1924

I love that there are 108 pages of these awesome shoes and that you guys have been keeping this thread alive since '09. Keep up the good work! And now I just need to find a pair that fits my budget since these pages have confirmed my love for suede.

post #1618 of 1924
X-Post. AS Ramsey

post #1619 of 1924
Quote:
Originally Posted by glenjay View Post

First let me say that there are plenty of examples of great looking cap toe suede shoes, many in this thread alone.

That being said, the cap toe style is the defining style for a business shoe to be worn with business suits (lounge suits). Starting with stitch cap, then punch cap, semi-brogue and quarter brogue in order of formality; typically in black calfskin for city clothing styles and colors.

Certainly any style of shoe can be made with any type of leather, I just think that certain styles work better with certain leathers. Suede is inherently a casual leather (country), whereas the cap toe style is more of a business (city) style. To me it’s like wearing a tweed jacket with worsted wool slacks.

The look just doesn’t work for me, but it’s based more on personal perspective than anything else.

Just as a side note: (in relation to shoe construction and history) using the term balmoral as a general description of a closed lace shoe is really an Americanism. The balmoral shoe is a derivative of the balmoral boot which is mainly defined by a horizontal seam across the quarters, without a seam to the welt. The term oxford is more universally used/accepted to describe a closed lace shoe, be it balmoral, adelaide, swan neck, or other seam structure.

Interesting, I never really thought of a captoe as being inherently formal. Sure, a black calf stitch cap is about as formal as it gets (outside of black tie patent leather shoes or opera pumps), but I think the leather type holds more water than the style when it comes to formality. I would have no problem wearing suede punch caps with a casual-ish outfit, or even dressing them up a bit with a linen suit. I think they can be pretty versatile in that respect.

EDIT- I just bought those suede captoe Sutors from STF, I hope they fit well!
Edited by Beatlegeuse - 8/1/13 at 9:34pm
post #1620 of 1924
I ordered a pair of Carmina chocolate suede string loafers and I'm curious about their versatility. Is this a shoe I can wear with wool or flannel dress pants in a business casual work environment? I like their look with navy casual pants and jeans but curious how casual the string styling makes them and whether they're appropriate for an office environment this fall.

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